VR1-positive primary afferents contact NK1-positive spinoparabrachial neurons

Authors

  • Se Jin Hwang,

    1. Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
    2. Department of Anatomy, College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul, South Korea
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  • Alain Burette,

    1. Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
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  • Juli G. Valtschanoff

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599
    • Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, CB 7090, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599
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Abstract

Neurons in rat superficial dorsal horn that express neurokinin receptor 1 (NK1), a receptor for substance P, play a critical role in the development of hyperalgesia. Thermal hyperalgesia is dramatically reduced after ablation of these neurons, but, paradoxically, not in mice that lack the NK1 receptor (Mantyh et al. [1997] Science 278:275–279). Because primary afferents that express vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), a receptor for noxious heat, are essential for thermal nociception and hyperalgesia, we reasoned that VR1-positive fibers may terminate onto NK1-expressing dorsal horn neurons. We therefore combined immunofluorescent staining for VR1 and NK1 to show that NK1-positive neurons in lamina I are contacted by VR1-positive fibers. That these contacts represent synapses was verified by staining for the presynaptic marker synaptophysin and by electron microscopy. By combining retrograde tracing with immunocytochemistry, we also found that most NK1-positive cells contacted by VR1-positive fibers project to the lateral parabrachial nucleus. Because quantitative evaluation suggests a preferential targeting of NK1-positive lamina I neurons by fibers containing VR1, these results demonstrate a significant monosynaptic innervation of spinoparabrachial neurons by VR1-positive afferents. J. Comp. Neurol. 460:255–265, 2003. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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