ATBF1-A protein, but not ATBF1-B, is preferentially expressed in developing rat brain

Authors

  • Yoko Ishii,

    1. Second Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
    2. Toyama Kyoritsu Hospital, Toyama, 931-8313, Japan
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  • Makoto Kawaguchi,

    1. Second Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
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  • Kiyoshi Takagawa,

    1. Second Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
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  • Takeshi Oya,

    1. Second Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
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  • Shigeharu Nogami,

    1. Second Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
    2. Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
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  • Amane Tamura,

    1. Second Department of Internal Medicine, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, 663-8501, Japan
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    • Dr. Amane Tamura died on 14 January 2001. We dedicate this article to the memory of a brilliant and beloved colleague.

  • Yutaka Miura,

    1. Department of Molecular Neurobiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Nagoya City University, Nagoya, 467-8601, Japan
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  • Akio Ido,

    1. Department of Experimental Therapeutics Translational Research Center, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, 606-8507, Japan
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  • Nobuo Sakata,

    1. Department of Biochemistry, Showa Pharmaceutical University, Tokyo, 142-8555, Japan
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  • Tomoko Hashimoto-Tamaoki,

    1. Department of Genetics, Hyogo College of Medicine, Nishinomiya, 663-8501, Japan
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  • Tomoatsu Kimura,

    1. Department of Orthopedics, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
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  • Takayoshi Saito,

    1. Toyama Kyoritsu Hospital, Toyama, 931-8313, Japan
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  • Taiki Tamaoki,

    1. Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta T2N 4N1, Canada
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  • Masakiyo Sasahara

    Corresponding author
    1. Second Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Toyama, 930-0194, Japan
    • Second Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Toyama Medical and Pharmaceutical University, 2630, Sugitani, Toyama City, 930-0194, Japan
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Abstract

The ATBF1 gene encodes transcription factors containing four homeodomains and multiple zinc finger motifs. However, the gene products have yet to be identified and the role remains unknown in vivo. In this study, we raised an antiserum for ATBF1 and found high levels of expression of ATBF1 in developing rat brain. Western and Northern blot analyses detected a 400 kDa protein and 12.5 kb mRNA in developing rat brain, respectively; both corresponding to ATBF1-A but not the B isoform. The protein was highly expressed in the midbrain and diencephalon and mRNA was highly expressed in the brainstem, mostly in embryo and neonatal brain. Immunohistochemistry identified postmitotic neurons in the brainstem as the major site of ATBF1 expression, and the expression levels varied depending on age of and location in the brain. Expression was transient and weak in the precursor cells at early neurogenesis. ATBF1 decreased postnatally, but remained in mature neurons, including those expressing DOPA decarboxylase (DDC). High levels of ATBF1 were expressed in precursor cells in accordance with neurogenesis and were continued to the mature neurons in specific areas such as the inferior colliculus. Expression was not significant from precursor cells to mature neurons in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. ATBF1 and its Drosophila homolog, Zfh-2, are known to regulate cell differentiation and proliferation via the interaction with either of the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, c-myb, or the DDC gene. Together with these reported functions the expression features detected here suggest that ATBF1 may participate in the regulation of neuronal cell maturation or region-specific central nervous system differentiation. J. Comp. Neurol. 465:57–71, 2003. © 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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