Functional remodeling of glutamate receptors by inner retinal neurons occurs from an early stage of retinal degeneration

Authors

  • Jacqueline Chua,

    1. Department of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92010, Auckland, New Zealand
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  • Erica L. Fletcher,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010, Melbourne, Australia
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  • Michael Kalloniatis

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92010, Auckland, New Zealand
    2. Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville 3010, Melbourne, Australia
    • Department of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, New Zealand
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Abstract

Retinitis pigmentosa reflects a family of diseases that result in retinal photoreceptor death and functional blindness. The natural course of retinal changes secondary to photoreceptor degeneration involves anatomical remodeling (cell process alterations and soma displacement) and neurochemical remodeling. Anatomical remodeling predominantly occurs late in the disease process and cannot explain the significant visual deficits that occur very early in the disease process. Neurochemical remodeling includes modified glutamate receptor disposition and altered responses secondary to functional activation of glutamate receptors. We investigated the neurochemical remodeling of retinal neurons in the rd/rd (rd1) mouse retina by tracking the functional activation of glutamate receptors with a cation probe, agmatine. We provide evidence that bipolar cells and amacrine cells undergo selective remodeling of glutamate receptors during the early phases of retinal degeneration. These early neurochemical changes in the rd/rd mouse retina include the expression of aberrant functional ionotropic glutamate receptors on the cone ON bipolar cells from postnatal day 15 (P15), poor functional activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors on both rod and cone ON bipolar cells throughout development/degeneration, and poor functional activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors on amacrine cells from P15. Our results suggest that major neurochemical remodeling occurs prior to anatomical remodeling, and likely accounts for the early visual deficits in the rd/rd mouse retina. J. Comp. Neurol. 514:473–491, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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