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Neurons express hemoglobin α- and β-chains in rat and human brains

Authors

  • Franziska Richter,

    1. Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095
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  • Bernhard H. Meurers,

    1. Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095
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  • Chunni Zhu,

    1. Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095
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  • Vera P. Medvedeva,

    1. Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095
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  • Marie-Françoise Chesselet

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095
    2. Department of Neurobiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095
    • Reed Neurological Research Center, B114, 710 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095
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Abstract

Hemoglobin is the oxygen carrier in vertebrate blood erythrocytes. Here we report that hemoglobin chains are expressed in mammalian brain neurons and are regulated by a mitochondrial toxin. Transcriptome analyses of laser-capture microdissected nigral dopaminergic neurons in rats and striatal neurons in mice revealed the presence of hemoglobin α, adult chain 2 (Hba-a2) and hemoglobin β (Hbb) transcripts, whereas other erythroid markers were not detected. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis confirmed the expression of Hba-a2 and Hbb in nigral dopaminergic neurons, striatal γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurons, and cortical pyramidal neurons in rats. Combined in situ hybridization histochemistry and immunohistochemistry with the neuronal marker neuronal nuclear antigen (NeuN) in rat brain further confirmed the presence of hemoglobin mRNAs in neurons. Immunohistochemistry identified hemoglobin α- and β-chains in both rat and human brains, and hemoglobin proteins were detected by Western blotting in whole rat brain tissue as well as in cultures of mesencephalic neurons, further excluding the possibility of blood contamination. Systemic administration of the mitochondrial inhibitor rotenone (2 mg/kg/d, 7d, s.c.) induced a marked decrease in Hba-a2 and Hbb but not neuroglobin or cytoglobin mRNA in transcriptome analyses of nigral dopaminergic neurons. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the transcriptional downregulation of Hba-a2 and Hbb in nigral, striatal, and cortical neurons. Thus, hemoglobin chains are expressed in neurons and are regulated by treatments that affect mitochondria, opening up the possibility that they may play a novel role in neuronal function and response to injury. J. Comp. Neurol. 515:538–547, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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