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Clathrin assembly proteins AP180 and CALM in the embryonic rat brain

Authors

  • Catherine M. Schwartz,

    1. Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224
    2. Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Laboratory of Molecular Neurobiology, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Aiwu Cheng,

    1. Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224
    2. MedStar Research Institute, Baltimore, Maryland 21224
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  • Mohamed R. Mughal,

    1. Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224
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  • Mark P. Mattson,

    1. Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224
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  • Pamela J. Yao

    Corresponding author
    1. Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging Intramural Research Program, Baltimore, Maryland 21224
    • Laboratory of Neurosciences, National Institute on Aging, Biomedical Research Center, Room 05C226, 251 Bayview Boulevard, Baltimore, MD 21224
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Abstract

Clathrin-coated vesicles are known to play diverse and pivotal roles in cells. The proper formation of clathrin-coated vesicles is dependent on, and highly regulated by, a large number of clathrin assembly proteins. These assembly proteins likely determine the functional specificity of clathrin-coated vesicles, and together they control a multitude of intracellular trafficking pathways, including those involved in embryonic development. In this study, we focus on two closely related clathrin assembly proteins, AP180 and CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein), in the developing embryonic rat brain. We find that AP180 begins to be expressed at embryonic day 14 (E14), but only in postmitotic cells that have acquired a neuronal fate. CALM, on the other hand, is expressed as early as E12, by both neural stem cells and postmitotic neurons. In vitro loss-of-function studies using RNA interference (RNAi) indicate that AP180 and CALM are dispensable for some aspects of embryonic neurogenesis but are required for the growth of postmitotic neurons. These results identify the developmental stage of AP180 and CALM expression and suggest that each protein has distinct functions in neural development. J. Comp. Neurol. 518:3803–3818, 2010. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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