Global expression profiling of globose basal cells and neurogenic progression within the olfactory epithelium

Authors

  • Richard C. Krolewski,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111
    2. Program in Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Biology, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111
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  • Adam Packard,

    1. Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111
    2. Program in Cellular, Molecular, and Developmental Biology, Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111
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  • James E. Schwob

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111
    • Department of Anatomy and Cellular Biology, Tufts University School of Medicine, 136 Harrison Ave., Boston, MA 02111
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Abstract

Ongoing, lifelong neurogenesis maintains the neuronal population of the olfactory epithelium in the face of piecemeal neuronal turnover and restores it following wholesale loss. The molecular phenotypes corresponding to different stages along the progression from multipotent globose basal cell (GBC) progenitor to differentiated olfactory sensory neuron are poorly characterized. We used the transgenic expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and cell surface markers to FACS-isolate ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs, Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs and immature neurons, and ΔOMP-eGFP(+) mature neurons from normal adult mice. In addition, the latter two populations were also collected 3 weeks after olfactory bulb ablation, a lesion that results in persistently elevated neurogenesis. Global profiling of mRNA from the populations indicates that all stages of neurogenesis share a cohort of >2,100 genes that are upregulated compared to sustentacular cells. A further cohort of >1,200 genes are specifically upregulated in GBCs as compared to sustentacular cells and differentiated neurons. The increased rate of neurogenesis caused by olfactory bulbectomy had little effect on the transcriptional profile of the Neurog1-eGFP(+) population. In contrast, the abbreviated lifespan of ΔOMP-eGFP(+) neurons born in the absence of the bulb correlated with substantial differences in gene expression as compared to the mature neurons of the normal epithelium. Detailed examination of the specific genes upregulated in the different progenitor populations revealed that the chromatin modifying complex proteins LSD1 and coREST were expressed sequentially in upstream ΔSox2-eGFP(+) GBCs and Neurog1-eGFP(+) GBCs/immature neurons. The expression patterns of these proteins are dynamically regulated after activation of the epithelium by methyl bromide lesion. J. Comp. Neurol. 521:833–859, 2013. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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