Cloning, phylogeny, and regional expression of a Y5 receptor mRNA in the brain of the sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

Authors

  • Juan Pérez-Fernández,

    1. Neurolam Group, Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, University of Vigo, Spain
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  • Manuel Megías,

    Corresponding author
    1. Neurolam Group, Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, University of Vigo, Spain
    • Correspondence to: Manuel A. Pombal, PhD, Neurolam Group, Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, University of Vigo, 36310-Vigo, Spain. E-mail: pombal@uvigo.es

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  • Manuel A. Pombal

    1. Neurolam Group, Department of Functional Biology and Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, University of Vigo, Spain
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ABSTRACT

The NPY receptors known as Y receptors are classified into three subfamilies, Y1, Y2, and Y5, and are involved in different physiological functions. The Y5 receptor is the only member of the Y5 subfamily, and it is present in all vertebrate groups, except for teleosts. Both molecular and pharmacological studies show that Y5 receptor is highly conserved during vertebrate evolution. Furthermore, this receptor is widely expressed in the mammalian brain, including the hypothalamus, where it is thought to take part in feeding and homeostasis regulation. Lampreys belong to the agnathan lineage, and they are thought to have branched out between the two whole-genome duplications that occurred in vertebrates. Therefore, they are in a key position for studies on the evolution of gene families in vertebrates. Here we report the cloning, phylogeny, and brain expression pattern of the sea lamprey Y5 receptor. In phylogenetic studies, the lamprey Y5 receptor clusters in a basal position, together with Y5 receptors of other vertebrates. The mRNA of this receptor is broadly expressed in the lamprey brain, being especially abundant in hypothalamic areas. Its expression pattern is roughly similar to that reported for other vertebrates and parallels the expression pattern of the Y1 receptor subtype previously described by our group, as it occurs in mammals. Altogether, these results confirm that a Y5 receptor is present in lampreys, thus being highly conserved during the evolution of vertebrates, and suggest that it is involved in many brain functions, the only known exception being teleosts. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:1132–1154, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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