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Evolutionarily conserved organization of the dopaminergic system in lamprey: SNc/VTA afferent and efferent connectivity and D2 receptor expression

Authors

  • Juan Pérez-Fernández,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, the Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Marcus Stephenson-Jones,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, the Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Shreyas M. Suryanarayana,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, the Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Brita Robertson,

    1. Department of Neuroscience, the Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
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  • Sten Grillner

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Neuroscience, the Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
    • Correspondence to: Sten Grillner, The Nobel Institute for Neurophysiology, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden. E-mail: sten.grillner@ki.se

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ABSTRACT

The dopaminergic system influences motor behavior, signals reward and novelty, and is an essential component of the basal ganglia in all vertebrates including the lamprey, one of the phylogenetically oldest vertebrates. The intrinsic organization and function of the lamprey basal ganglia is highly conserved. For instance, the direct and indirect pathways are modulated through dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in lamprey and in mammals. The nucleus of the tuberculum posterior, a homologue of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc)/ventral tegmental area (VTA) is present in lamprey, but only scarce data exist about its connectivity. Likewise, the D2 receptor is expressed in the striatum, but little is known about its localization in other brain areas. We used in situ hybridization and tracer injections, both in combination with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, to characterize the SNc/VTA efferent and afferent connectivity, and to relate its projection pattern with D2 receptor expression in particular. We show that most features of the dopaminergic system are highly conserved. As in mammals, the direct pallial (cortex in mammals) input and the basal ganglia connectivity with the SNc/VTA are present as part of the evaluation system, as well as input from the tectum as the evolutionary basis for salience/novelty detection. Moreover, the SNc/VTA receives sensory information from the olfactory bulbs, optic tectum, octavolateral area, and dorsal column nucleus, and it innervates, apart from the nigrostriatal pathway, several motor-related areas. This suggests that the dopaminergic system also contributes to the control of different motor centers at the brainstem level. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:3775–3794, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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