Comparison of trigeminal receptor location and structure in the periodontal ligament of different types of teeth from the rat, cat, and monkey

Authors

  • Dr. Margaret R. Byers,

    Corresponding author
    1. Departments of Anesthesiology, University of Washington, RN-10, Seattle, Washington 98195
    2. Departments of Biological Structure and Endodontics, University of Washington, RN-10, Seattle, Washington 98195
    • Department of Anesthesiology, RN-10, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195
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  • Willie K. Dong

    1. Departments of Anesthesiology, University of Washington, RN-10, Seattle, Washington 98195
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Abstract

The periodontal ligament is richly innervated by mechanoreceptors whose cell bodies are located either in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) or the mesencephalic (MS) trigeminal nucleus. Both are sensitive to stretch of the ligament induced by tooth movement, but their thresholds, central connections, and functional significance differ. This study compared the location of TG and MS receptors in the periodontal ligament of cat teeth after labeling each by anterograde axonal transport. We also compared the location and ultrastructure of the feline TG receptors with labeled TG receptors in the periodontal ligament of monkey teeth and rat incisors in order to determine their location and ultrastructural properties.

We found that the MS and TG receptors had a different distribution in the periodontal ligament of cat teeth; the MS terminals were concentrated below and next to the base of the roots, whereas the TG receptors were most numerous around the middle of the roots. The TG receptors of monkey teeth had a similar location to the feline TG receptors, but those of rat incisors were very different. Rat incisors are curved, continuously erupting teeth, and their TG receptors were located primarily on the lingual side in the alveolar (nonerupting) portion of the ligament. Ultrastructural comparisons found that most mechanoreceptors in the periodontal ligament of all the teeth had an unencapsulated branched Ruffini-like structure. The TG receptors in the rat incisor ligament were the largest; those of monkey had the most varied form. Some coiled or encapsulated receptors were found in the monkey and cat ligament, but not in the rat incisor ligament. The TG receptors appear to be located at sites that would be most easily stretched during tooth contact. The different sites and intensity of the stretch forces occurring during the use of different types of teeth may determine the variations in the size and location of the TG mechanoreceptors and of their associated support cells. The different distribution of MS receptors may contribute to their response thresholds and static properties, which differ from those of TG receptors.

Ancillary