Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 520 Issue 15

15 October 2012

Volume 520, Issue 15

Pages Spc1–Spc1, 3295–3552

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. Alterations in sulfated chondroitin glycosaminoglycans following controlled cortical impact injury in mice (page Spc1)

      Jae-Hyuk Yi, Yasuhiro Katagiri, Bala Susarla, David Figge, Aviva J. Symes and Herbert M. Geller

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23205

      Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are major growth-inhibitory molecules found in the glial scar following an insult to the central nervous system. By using a cortical contusion injury model in mice, we show that the injury causes both an increased level of 4-sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) in the tight band around the lesion core, and a decreased level of aggrecan and phosphacan in the pericontusional cortex. These results demonstrate a region-specific change in CSPGs following a cortical contusion injury. PNN, perineuronal net.

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. Alterations in sulfated chondroitin glycosaminoglycans following controlled cortical impact injury in mice (pages 3295–3313)

      Jae-Hyuk Yi, Yasuhiro Katagiri, Bala Susarla, David Figge, Aviva J. Symes and Herbert M. Geller

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23156

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPGs) are major growth-inhibitory molecules found in the glial scar following an insult to the central nervous system. By using a cortical contusion injury model in mice, we show that the injury causes both an increased level of 4-sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAGs) in the tight band around the lesion core, and a decreased level of aggrecan and phosphacan in the pericontusional cortex. These results demonstrate a region-specific change in CSPGs following a cortical contusion injury. PNN, perineuronal net.

    2. Biciliated ependymal cell proliferation contributes to spinal cord growth (pages 3528–3552)

      Clara Alfaro-Cervello, Mario Soriano-Navarro, Zaman Mirzadeh, Arturo Alvarez-Buylla and Jose Manuel Garcia-Verdugo

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23104

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