Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 520 Issue 18

15 December 2012

Volume 520, Issue 18

Pages Spc1–Spc1, 4051–4311

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Molecular characterization of the subnuclei in rat habenula (page Spc1)

      Hidenori Aizawa, Megumi Kobayashi, Sayaka Tanaka, Tomoki Fukai and Hitoshi Okamoto

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23230

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. Molecular characterization of the subnuclei in rat habenula (pages 4051–4066)

      Hidenori Aizawa, Megumi Kobayashi, Sayaka Tanaka, Tomoki Fukai and Hitoshi Okamoto

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23167

    2. Dye fills reveal additional olfactory tracts in the protocerebrum of wild-type Drosophila (pages 4131–4140)

      Nobuaki K. Tanaka, Emiko Suzuki, Louis Dye, Aki Ejima and Mark Stopfer

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23149

    3. The sea lamprey UNC5 receptors: cDNA cloning, phylogenetic analysis and expression in reticulospinal neurons at larval and adult stages of development (pages 4141–4156)

      Antón Barreiro-Iglesias, Cindy Laramore and Michael I. Shifman

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23143

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We cloned three sea lamprey uncoordinated (UNC)5 receptors and we report their expression in larval and adult sea lampreys. Extensive expression of the UNC5 receptors was observed in most brain regions. Expression of these receptors was observed in identifiable reticulospinal neurons. Expression of UNC5s was observed in reticulospinal neurons that when axotomized are known to be “bad regenerators.” Our results suggest that the UNC5s may play a role in limiting axonal regeneration after spinal cord injury.

    4. Forebrain GABAergic projections from the dorsal raphe nucleus identified by using GAD67–GFP knock-in mice (pages 4157–4167)

      Sun Jung Bang and Kathryn G. Commons

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The current study shows that GABAergic neurons in the dorsal raphe display trends for selective projections to the forebrain including the prefrontal cortex, nucleus accumbens, and lateral hypothalamus. These findings suggest that a notable fraction of the ascending projections from the dorsal raphe arise from GABAergic neurons. The results also indicate that GABAergic neurons might have the capacity to both influence local network activity and contribute to forebrain output. For abbreviations, see list in text.

    5. Neuroanatomy of melanocortin-4 receptor pathway in the lateral hypothalamic area (pages 4168–4183)

      Huxing Cui, Jong-Woo Sohn, Laurent Gautron, Hisayuki Funahashi, Kevin W. Williams, Joel K. Elmquist and Michael Lutter

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23145

    6. Peripheral axons of the adult zebrafish maxillary barbel extensively remyelinate during sensory appendage regeneration (pages 4184–4203)

      Alex C. Moore, Tiffany E. Mark, Ann K. Hogan, Jacek Topczewski and Elizabeth E. LeClair

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23147

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Myelination is an essential component of nerve conduction. Peripheral axons of the zebrafish maxillary barbel (ZMB), a cranial sensory structure, are progressively myelinated during juvenile development and are remyelinated during adult appendage regeneration. This optically clear, externally accessible structure offers a novel context in which to study axon extension, Schwann cell migration, and remyelination in mature zebrafish, enhancing the utility of this popular model organism.

    7. Characterization of nitric oxide signaling pathways in the mouse retina (pages 4204–4217)

      Jan Blom, Tom Giove, Monika Deshpande and William D. Eldred

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23148

    8. Direct visualization of CaMKII at postsynaptic densities by electron microscopy tomography (pages 4218–4225)

      Andrea Fera, Ayse Dosemeci, Alioscka A. Sousa, Charlotte Yang, Richard D. Leapman and Thomas S. Reese

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23151

    9. Intrinsic signal optical imaging evidence for dorsal V3 in the prosimian galago (Otolemur garnettii) (pages 4254–4274)

      Reuben H. Fan, Mary K.L. Baldwin, Walter J. Jermakowicz, Vivien A. Casagrande, Jon H. Kaas and Anna W. Roe

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23154

    10. “Late” macroendosomes and acidic endosomes in vertebrate motor nerve terminals (pages 4275–4293)

      Richard S. Stewart, Haibing Teng and Robert S. Wilkinson

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vertebrate motor nerve terminals exhibit bulk- or macro-endocysosis during and after synaptic activity. We have studied the fate of living macroendosomes (MEs) created by brief stimulation using 4D imaging. Besides dissipation into vesicles, we observed three additional fates. Some MEs underwent spontaneous exocytosis. Others interacted or fused with novel lysosome-like structures within the terminal, called acidic endosomes (AEs). A few MEs remained within the terminal beyond our imaging period. We conclude that MEs serve as sorting endosomes or “cisternae.” LysoT, LysoTracker.

    11. Stat3 defines three populations of müller glia and is required for initiating maximal müller glia proliferation in the regenerating zebrafish retina (pages 4294–4311)

      Craig M. Nelson, Ryne A. Gorsuch, Travis J. Bailey, Kristin M. Ackerman, Sean C. Kassen and David R. Hyde

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23213

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This work describes three different populations of Müller glia in the light-damaged retina. One population is Stat3-positive and Ascl1a-negative and does not proliferate. A second population (primary proliferating Müller glia [PPMg]) is stimulated by dying neurons to increase Lin28, which in turn activates Ascl1a, allowing these cells to proliferate. Ascl1a also activates Stat3 expression in the PPMg, which stimulates the same signaling pathway in nearby secondary proliferating Müller glia (the third population of Müller glia) and induces their proliferation.

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