Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 521 Issue 11

1 August 2013

Volume 521, Issue 11

Pages Spc1–Spc1, 2399–2644

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    4. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Müller cells express the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in the vervet monkey retina (page Spc1)

      Joseph Bouskila, Pasha Javadi, Christian Casanova, Maurice Ptito and Jean-François Bouchard

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23359

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    4. Erratum
    1. Müller cells express the cannabinoid CB2 receptor in the vervet monkey retina (pages 2399–2415)

      Joseph Bouskila, Pasha Javadi, Christian Casanova, Maurice Ptito and Jean-François Bouchard

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23333

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By using confocal microscopy, we show that cannabinoid receptor CB2 (CB2R) is expressed in retinal Müller cells of the vervet monkey. CB2R expression (magenta) is found throughout glutamine synthetase (GS, green)-positive Müller cells, with a higher polarization toward the outer retina. Scale bar = 75 μm

    2. Mapping kainate activation of inner neurons in the rat retina (pages 2416–2438)

      Lisa Nivison-Smith, Daniel Sun, Erica L. Fletcher, Robert E. Marc and Michael Kalloniatis

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23305

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      [Graphic abstract text]Using the probe agmatine, we found that kainate sensitivity is highest in OFF bipolar cells (particularly type 2) followed by ganglion cells. GABA/glycine amacrine cells (ACs) are the most sensitive ACs, followed by glycine and GABA ACs. Cholinergic ACs are highly responsive, but dopaminergic ACs do not express functional kainate receptors.

    3. Early remodeling of müller cells in the rd/rd mouse model of retinal dystrophy (pages 2439–2453)

      Jacqueline Chua, Lisa Nivison-Smith, Erica L. Fletcher, Stuart Trenholm, Gautam B. Awatramani and Michael Kalloniatis

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23307

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the rd/rd mouse, Müller cell processes are reduced in the outer retina during early degeneration but increase after total photoreceptor loss. Conversely, GFAP expression increases at early stages then decreases at older ages. Müller cell electrophysiology remains normal during early degeneration. Thus, rd/rd gliosis has an initial conservative response followed by active remodeling.

    4. Immunohistochemical distribution of calretinin and calbindin (D-28k) in the brain of the cladistian Polypterus senegalus (pages 2454–2485)

      Patricia Graña, Mónica Folgueira, Gema Huesa, Ramón Anadón and Julián Yáñez

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23293

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The distribution of calretinin and calbindin is investigated in the brain of Polypterus, a basal ray-finned fish. This allowed us to study, among other factors, the segregation of olfactory neurons in the olfactory system, distinguishing between pallial regions, characterizing asymmetry and segregation of habenular populations and projections, characterizing a secondary gustatory/visceral nucleus, and distinguishing among territories in the viscerosensory column and octavolateral region. Characterization of positive populations in Polypterus provided further criteria for analyzing the evolution of the brain in ray-finned fishes. Transverse section throught the nucleus medianus magnocelularis of the Senegal bichir showing Calretinin immunoreactive cells (in green).

    5. Expression of voltage-gated calcium channel α2δ4 subunits in the mouse and rat retina (pages 2486–2501)

      Luis Pérez De Sevilla Müller, Janelle Liu, Alexander Solomon, Allen Rodriguez and Nicholas C. Brecha

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The expression and distribution of the α2δ4 subunit in the retina was evaluated by using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, western blot, and immunohistochemistry. α2δ4 subunit mRNA and protein are present in brain, retina, and liver homogenates. Immunostaining for the α2δ4 subunit is mainly localized to Müller cell processes and endfeet, photoreceptor terminals, and photoreceptor outer segments. In addition, this subunit is expressed in a few displaced ganglion cells and bipolar cell dendrites. These findings suggest that the α2δ4 subunit participates in the modulation of L-type Ca2+ current regulating neurotransmitter release from photoreceptors and bipolar cells, and regulates Ca2+-dependent signaling pathways in Müller cells.

    6. GABAergic inputs from direct and indirect striatal projection neurons onto cholinergic interneurons in the primate putamen (pages 2502–2522)

      Kalynda Kari Gonzales, Jean-Francois Pare, Thomas Wichmann and Yoland Smith

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23295

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We performed a quantitative ultrastructural analysis of the GABAergic innervation of cholinergic interneurons (ChIs) in the monkey post-commissural putamen. Our findings show that ChIs receive prominent GABAergic inputs from multiple origins, including a significant contingent (24%) from axon collaterals of direct (substance P-expressing) and indirect (enkephalin-expressing) pathway projection neurons, along their entire somatodendritic domain. Our data suggest that the activity of striatal ChIs is tightly regulated by local connections of GABAergic axon collaterals of projection neurons in primates.

    7. Selective coexpression of synaptic proteins, α-synuclein, cysteine string protein-α, synaptophysin, synaptotagmin-1, and synaptobrevin-2 in vesicular acetylcholine transporter-immunoreactive axons in the guinea pig ileum (pages 2523–2537)

      Dale F. Sharrad, Wei-Ping Gai and Simon J.H. Brookes

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23296

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mishandling of α-synuclein contributes to formation of Lewy bodies and Lewy neurites in Parkinson's disease. Here we show that the synaptic chaperones α-synuclein and cysteine string protein-α and the synaptic vesicle proteins synaptophysin, synaptotagmin-1, and synaptobrevin-2 are selectively coexpressed in cholinergic axons, marked by vesicular acetylcholine transporter, in the enteric nervous system of the guinea pig ileum. We speculate that the neurotransmitter-release mechanism utilized by cholinergic neurons in the gut may predispose them to degeneration in Parkinson's disease.

    8. Differential connectivity of short- vs. long-range extrinsic and intrinsic cortical inputs to perirhinal neurons (pages 2538–2550)

      Gunes Unal, Jean-Francois Pare, Yoland Smith and Denis Pare

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23297

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Extrinsic and intrinsic cortical inputs to the perirhinal cortex involve more inhibition at rostrocaudal levels adjacent to the neurons at the origin of the projection (short range) than at longitudinally distant sites (long range). This differential connectivity likely shapes perirhinal contributions to memory.

    9. Cell death atlas of the postnatal mouse ventral forebrain and hypothalamus: Effects of age and sex (pages 2551–2569)

      Todd H. Ahern, Stefanie Krug, Audrey V. Carr, Elaine K. Murray, Emmett Fitzpatrick, Lynn Bengston, Jill McCutcheon, Geert J. De Vries and Nancy G. Forger

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23298

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We used immunocytochemistry for activated caspase-3 (AC3) to quantify developmental cell death in the hypothalamus and ventral forebrain of male and female mice between postnatal day (P) 1 and P11. The peak of cell death varied between P1 and P7, and rate of cell death varied over fivefold among the 16 regions examined. Several sex differences in cell death or regional volume were observed, and for almost all regions a significant reduction in cell death occurred between P5 and P7.

    10. Morphological analysis of the primary center receiving spatial information transferred by the waggle dance of honeybees (pages 2570–2584)

      Hiroyuki Ai and Hiromi Hagio

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23299

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We demonstrate that the topological organization of sensory afferents within the dorsal subesophageal ganglion (dSEG) reflects the subregions of the peripheral neck hairs (NHs; detector of direction). The terminals of the NH afferents within the dSEG are in close apposition to those of Johnston's organ (detector of distance) afferents.

    11. Intra-areal and corticocortical circuits arising in the dysgranular zone of rat primary somatosensory cortex that processes deep somatic input (pages 2585–2601)

      Uhnoh Kim and Taehee Lee

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23300

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      As shown in the tangential section of rat frontal cortex, the proprioceptive area of primary somatosensory cortex (SI) that is also known as the dysgranular zone (DSZ) projects to selective regions of the second somatic (SII), posterior parietal (PPC), and primary motor cortex (MI). These regions in each cortex are separated from the areas that receive SI input from the whisker area. These observations indicate that parallel circuits arise from the SI proprioceptive and cutaneous areas to the surrounding cortices.

    12. Differential changes in the cellular composition of the developing marsupial brain (pages 2602–2620)

      Adele M.H. Seelke, James C. Dooley and Leah A. Krubitzer

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23301

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Throughout development, the numbers of neurons and glia in the brain undergo dramatic nonlinear changes. We examined the cellular composition of the short-tailed opossum brain at multiple developmental milestones. Neuronal density and percentage are highest during neurogenesis and then decrease, and the total number of neurons in the opossum brain is relatively low compared with other mammals. The low number of neurons and high number of glia suggest that in marsupials glia may play a significant role in signal processing.

    13. Overexpression of nerve growth factor by murine smooth muscle cells: Role of the p75 neurotrophin receptor on sympathetic and sensory sprouting (pages 2621–2643)

      Casey N. Petrie, Laura J. Smithson, Anne-Marie Crotty, Bernadeta Michalski, Margaret Fahnestock and Michael D. Kawaja

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23302

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Overexpression of nerve growth factor (NGF) leads to robust sprouting by sympathetic axons in the descending colon and urinary bladder of transgenic mice. Axonal growth by sympathetic neurons is enhanced in the urinary bladder of those transgenic mice carrying two mutated alleles for the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75).

  3. Erratum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    4. Erratum
    1. You have free access to this content
      Confocal laser scanning microscopy and ultrastructural study of VGLUT2 thalamic input to striatal projection neurons in rats (page 2644)

      Wanlong Lei, Yunping Deng, Bingbing Liu, Shuhua Mu, Natalie M. Guley, Ting Wong and Anton Reiner

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23349

      This article corrects:

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION