Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 521 Issue 12

15 August 2013

Volume 521, Issue 12

Pages Spc1–Spc1, 2645–2887

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Diverse neuronal lineages make stereotyped contributions to the Drosophila locomotor control center, the central complex (page Spc1)

      Jacob S. Yang, Takeshi Awasaki, Hung-Hsiang Yu, Yisheng He, Peng Ding, Jui-Chun Kao and Tzumin Lee

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23366

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. Diverse neuronal lineages make stereotyped contributions to the Drosophila locomotor control center, the central complex (pages 2645–2662)

      Jacob S. Yang, Takeshi Awasaki, Hung-Hsiang Yu, Yisheng He, Peng Ding, Jui-Chun Kao and Tzumin Lee

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23339

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      Exhaustive clonal analysis in the adult Drosophila brain reveals stereotyped neuronal lineages that contribute to the central complex. Certain lineages make isomorphic intrinsic neurons, and other lineages establish domain-specific external connections; they intersect to make 3D matrices in various central complex subcompartments, underlying insect locomotor control.

    2. EphA7 expression identifies a unique neuronal compartment in the rat striatum (pages 2663–2679)

      Alexander X. Tai, Robert M. Cassidy and Lawrence F. Kromer

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23308

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      The EphA7 receptor is a member of the Eph/ephrin family of molecules, which are known to participate in axonal guidance and cell boundary formation during development. In the postnatal striatum, EphA7 expression delineates a novel striatal compartment. These “matrisome” compartments are located entirely within the striatal matrix and are organized into bands paralleling the curvature of the external capsule. The postnatal expression pattern of EphA7 suggests it plays a role in striatal compartment formation and/or the formation of striatal connections.

    3. Expression of the ghrelin receptor gene in neurons of the medulla oblongata of the rat (pages 2680–2702)

      Romke Bron, Lei Yin, Domenico Russo and John B. Furness

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23309

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      A detailed survey of ghrelin receptor (GHSR) mRNA expression in the rat medulla reveals expression in areas involved in gustatory, vestibulo-ocular, visceral sensory processing, and cardio-respiratory control. GHSR mRNA is found in the caudal and ventral aspects of the nucleus ambiguus and retroambiguus, but not in the rostral compact formation, ruling out control of esophageal musculature by ghrelin. GHSR mRNA expressing neurons (white) are distinct from catecholaminergic TH-expressing neurons (green) in the dorsal vagal complex (pictured) and the RVLM.

    4. Neurochemical codes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons activated by glucoprivation (pages 2703–2718)

      Lindsay M. Parker, Natasha N. Kumar, Tina Lonergan and Ann K. Goodchild

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23310

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      One-fourth of T4–T11 sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) contribute to counterregulatory responses following glucoprivation. Among the SPN controlling adrenaline release, 60% contain preproenkephalin (PPE), and 40% do not. SPN also innervate the celiac ganglia (CG), whose function includes controlling glucagon release and glycogenolysis, and 70% of this population also contains PPE. In contrast, 3% of activated SPN innervating the superior cervical ganglia contain PPE. A single function such as adrenaline release is controlled by a neurochemically heterogeneous population of SPN.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Axon diversity of lamina I local-circuit neurons in the lumbar spinal cord (pages 2719–2741)

      Peter Szucs, Liliana L. Luz, Raquel Pinho, Paulo Aguiar, Zsófia Antal, Sheena Y.X. Tiong, Andrew J. Todd and Boris V. Safronov

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23311

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      By using an intact spinal cord preparation the authors describe axon architecture of lamina I local circuit neurons (red and green). Extensive local and long rostrocaudal axon branches suggest that information feeds toward deeper laminae as well as neighboring segments, providing an anatomical substrate for interlaminar and intersegmental processing in the dorsal horn.

    6. Sexual dimorphism in the olfactory system of a solitary and a eusocial bee species (pages 2742–2755)

      Martin Streinzer, Christina Kelber, Sarah Pfabigan, Christoph J. Kleineidam and Johannes Spaethe

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23312

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      The solitary long-horned bee Eucera berlandi exhibits a spectacular sexual dimorphism in the antennae. We describe the dimorphism in the peripheral olfactory system and its representation in higher order neuropils of the olfactory path. Furthermore, we compare this with the eusocial honeybee and discuss similarities and differences in a physiological and evolutionary context.

    7. The oral sensory structures of Thaliacea (Tunicata) and consideration of the evolution of hair cells in chordata (pages 2756–2771)

      Federico Caicci, Fabio Gasparini, Francesca Rigon, Giovanna Zaniolo, Paolo Burighel and Lucia Manni

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23313

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      Tunicates, the closest relatives of vertebrates, possess a mechanoreceptor, the coronal organ, based on hair cells. We analyzed three thaliacean species that have evolved different solutions for mechanoreception. Some solutions are unique within tunicates, and others are shared; some are based on primary sensory cells and others on secondary sensory cells.

    8. The subcortical auditory structures in the Mongolian gerbil: II. Frequency-related topography of the connections with cortical field AI (pages 2772–2797)

      Eike Budinger, Michael Brosch, Henning Scheich and Judith Mylius

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23314

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      The Mongolian gerbil (Meriones unguiculatus) has become a frequently used animal model in auditory neuroscience. Here, we investigated the frequency-related topography of connections of the primary auditory cortical field (AI) with subcortical structures of the auditory system in this species. We found topographic, most likely frequency-matched (tonotopic) connections as well as non-topographic (non-tonotopic) connections. The former may serve for conservation of frequency-specific information in the respective target structures of AI, whereas the latter could be involved in frequency-integration processes.

    9. Intrinsic horizontal connections process global tactile features in the primary somatosensory cortex: Neuroanatomical evidence (pages 2798–2817)

      László Négyessy, Emese Pálfi, Mária Ashaber, Cory Palmer, Balázs Jákli, Robert M. Friedman, Li M. Chen and Anna W. Roe

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23317

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using bidirectional tract tracing combined with intrinsic signal optical imaging, the authors show strong connectivity between neighboring distal finger pad representations in area 3b of the somatosensory cortex of the squirrel monkey. In contrast, inter-areal connections are apparently digit specific. We propose that intra-areal connectivity is heavily involved in interdigit integration, whereas long-range inter-areal connections may act in a digit-specific manner. Scale bar = 1 mm.

    10. Chronic neurotrophin delivery promotes ectopic neurite growth from the spiral ganglion of deafened cochleae without compromising the spatial selectivity of cochlear implants (pages 2818–2832)

      Thomas G. Landry, James B. Fallon, Andrew K. Wise and Robert K. Shepherd

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23318

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      Using multichannel recording techniques combined with neural labelling, the authors show that spiral ganglion neurites in deafened cochleae chronically treated with exogenous neurotrophins and electrical stimulation exhibit ectopic growth compared with the highly organized neurite projections evident in hearing cochleae. Importantly, these anatomical changes did not affect the spread of neural activation to electrical stimulation via a cochlear implant.

    11. Maturation of peptide-positive synaptic arbors in the medicinal leech requires rhythmic target activity (pages 2833–2849)

      Daniel Kueh, Jolene Appiah and John Jellies

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23319

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      The formation of peptide-containing presynaptic varicosities in a motor neuron depends on rhythmic activity of the target and motor neuron. Disruption of rhythmic central pattern generator (CPG) drive during early development results in a pronounced deficit of motor synapses.

    12. Localization and divergent profiles of estrogen receptors and aromatase in the vocal and auditory networks of a fish with alternative mating tactics (pages 2850–2869)

      Daniel J. Fergus and Andrew H. Bass

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23320

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      Estrogens are critical in the nervous system and for behavioral regulation. Plainfin midshipman fish have alternative male reproductive morphs with divergent, hormonally regulated vocal behaviors. We identified duplicate estrogen receptors and localized them to central vocal and auditory networks. Quantification of estrogen receptors and aromatase transcripts revealed unique expression profiles in the vocal motor nucleus (VMN) of male and female morphs, suggesting that VMN is a major estrogen target. Differential receptor expression is likely crucial in maintaining behavioral differences in alternative reproductive tactics.

    13. Identification of multisegmental nociceptive afferents that modulate locomotor circuits in the neonatal mouse spinal cord (pages 2870–2887)

      Sravan Mandadi, Peter Hong, Michelle A. Tran, Joao M. Bráz, Pina Colarusso, Allan I. Basbaum and Patrick J. Whelan

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23321

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      It has been recognized for many years than long-range afferents travel multiple segments within the spinal cord but their function has been elusive. Here we present anatomical and electrophysiological evidence that molecularly defined TRPV1 nociceptive afferents that project multiple segments within the lumbosacral spinal cord can functionally affect rhythmic motor behaviors.

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