Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 521 Issue 16

November 2013

Volume 521, Issue 16

Pages Spc1–Spc1, 3601–3862

  1. Cover Image

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    3. Editorial
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    1. Global view of the functional molecular organization of the avian cerebrum: mirror images and functional columns (page Spc1)

      Erich D. Jarvis, Jing Yu, Miriam V. Rivas, Haruhito Horita, Gesa Feenders, Osceola Whitney, Syrus C. Jarvis, Electra R. Jarvis, Lubica Kubikova, Ana E.P. Puck, Connie Siang-Bakshi, Suzanne Martin, Michael McElroy, Erina Hara, Jason Howard, Andreas Pfenning, Henrik Mouritsen, Chun-Chun Chen and Kazuhiro Wada

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23462

  2. Editorial

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    3. Editorial
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  3. Commentary

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    1. The impact of gene expression analysis on evolving views of avian brain organization (pages 3604–3613)

      Juan F. Montiel and Zoltán Molnár

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23403

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      This commentary helps to put two extensive and comprehensive gene expression profiling studies on avian brain organization from Jarvis et al., 2013 and Chen et al., 2013 (both in this issue of Journal of Comparative Neurology) into context of recent literature and critically evaluates the strengths and weaknesses of various transcriptomics approaches in comparative neurobiology.

  4. Research Articles

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    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Global view of the functional molecular organization of the avian cerebrum: Mirror images and functional columns (pages 3614–3665)

      Erich D. Jarvis, Jing Yu, Miriam V. Rivas, Haruhito Horita, Gesa Feenders, Osceola Whitney, Syrus C. Jarvis, Electra R. Jarvis, Lubica Kubikova, Ana E.P. Puck, Connie Siang-Bakshi, Suzanne Martin, Michael McElroy, Erina Hara, Jason Howard, Andreas Pfenning, Henrik Mouritsen, Chun-Chun Chen and Kazuhiro Wada

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23404

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using bioinformatic profiling of constitutive and behaviorally regulated genes, we propose a novel view of avian brain organization, which group most of the telencephalon into four major cell populations of which three have mirror image counterparts above and below the lateral ventricle that function in columns for sensory-motor systems analogous to the mammalian brain.

    2. Molecular profiling of the developing avian telencephalon: Regional timing and brain subdivision continuities (pages 3666–3701)

      Chun-Chun Chen, Candace M. Winkler, Andreas R. Pfenning and Erich D. Jarvis

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23406

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      By performing quantitative and qualitative brain molecular profiling within and across multiple development stages, we discovered that four major pallial subdivisions each began as one ventral or dorsal domain that later formed specific folds around the lateral ventricle, and then formed more refined partitions into the adult pallial subdivisions.

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    7. Research Articles
    1. Digital atlas of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) brain: A high-resolution photo atlas (pages 3702–3715)

      Harvey J. Karten, Agnieszka Brzozowska-Prechtl, Peter V. Lovell, Daniel D. Tang, Claudio V. Mello, Haibin Wang and Partha P. Mitra

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23443

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      The authors present a high-quality, high-resolution atlas of digital images prepared from histological sections derived from the brains of male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). These images, made publicly available through an interactive website (http://zebrafinch.brainarchitecture.org/), provide a basis for the production of a dimensionally accurate, detailed digital non-stereotaxic atlas.

  6. Research Articles

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    7. Research Articles
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Odd-skipped labels a group of distinct neurons associated with the mushroom body and optic lobe in the adult Drosophila brain (pages 3716–3740)

      Peter Levy and Camilla Larsen

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23375

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      We have identified a group of distinct neurons on the adult Drosophila brain characterized by the expression of Odd-skipped. We term these Odd neurons. The Odd neuron cluster is divided into three groups. Group1 consists of a previously not described group of extrinsic mushroom body neurons. Group 2 is a novel group of visual neurons in Drosophila. Group 3 projects within the brain protocerebrum. We propose that subsets of Odd neurons are involved in processing olfactory and visual input.

    2. Neuronal and nonneuronal cholinergic structures in the mouse gastrointestinal tract and spleen (pages 3741–3767)

      Laurent Gautron, Joseph M. Rutkowski, Michael D. Burton, Wei Wei, Yihong Wan and Joel K. Elmquist

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23376

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      By using a reporter mouse model for cholinergic structures, this study revealed that immune cells in the intestinal lamina propria were frequently approached by a network of cholinergic fibers of enteric origin. In addition, it showed that cholinergic nonneuronal cells of varied phenotypes including epithelial cells, Microfold cells, and T-cells populated the mouse intestines and gallbladder. Finally, the spleen white pulp contained B- and T-cells and cholinergic fibers of spinal origin.

    3. Cortical connections to single digit representations in area 3b of somatosensory cortex in squirrel monkeys and prosimian galagos (pages 3768–3790)

      Chia-Chi Liao, Omar A. Gharbawie, Huixin Qi and Jon H. Kaas

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23377

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      Using electrophysiological mapping and neuroanatomical tracing approaches, we show that single digit representations of area 3b in primary somatosensory cortex are connected with the hand representations within area 3b and other somatosensory areas. The widespread feedback projections provide a substrate for spatial integration across adjacent digit representations in area 3b.

    4. Sensory neuroanatomy of stick insects highlights the evolutionary diversity of the orthopteroid subgenual organ complex (pages 3791–3803)

      Johannes Strauß and Reinhard Lakes-Harlan

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23378

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      The subgenual organ complex in stick insects is shown to consist of a subgenual organ and an elaborate distal organ present in the tibia of every leg. Somata of the sensory neurons in the distal organ occur in a linear row which is a novel organization for insect distal organs.

    5. Development of myelination and cholinergic innervation in the central auditory system of a prosimian primate (Otolemur garnetti) (pages 3804–3816)

      Daniel J. Miller, Elizabeth P. Lackey, Troy A. Hackett and Jon H. Kaas

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23379

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      This study used quantitative light microscopy to show that the expression of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in specific layers (I, IIIb/IV, Vb/VI) of the core auditory cortex in a newborn (0 WK) prosimian primate (Otolemur garnetti) was more similar to that observed in adults than expected, based upon work in other mammals.

    6. Comparative analysis of Tsc1 and Tsc2 single and double radial glial cell mutants (pages 3817–3831)

      Ulrike Mietzsch, James McKenna III, R. Michelle Reith, Sharon W. Way and Michael J. Gambello

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23380

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      Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is caused by mutations in either hamartin (TSC1) or tuberin (TSC2), partners of a heterodimer that inhibits the mTORC1 kinase. TSC2 mutations are associated with a more severe neurologic phenotype, but the biologic basis for this is unclear. Brain phenotypes of murine Tsc1 and Tsc2 single and double radial glial specific mutants demonstrate histologic differences that support individual hamartin and tuberin functions.

    7. Novel variant of neuronal intranuclear rodlet immunoreactive for 40 kDa huntingtin associated protein and ubiquitin in the mouse brain (pages 3832–3846)

      Pavel Milman and John Woulfe

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23381

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      Intranuclear rodlets (INRs) are poorly understood intranuclear bodies. We have identified a novel INR variant and provided evidence for additional INR subtypes, all sharing ubiquitin immunoreactivity. These INRs selectively associate with melanin concentrating hormone (MCH) and noradrenergic neurons of the hypothalamus and the locus coeruleus, respectively. We also demonstrated for the first time that biochemically distinct INR subtypes can co-exist within a single nucleus. Our findings highlight the biochemical diversity and cell type specific expression of these enigmatic intranuclear structures.

    8. Intraspinal stretch receptor neurons mediate different motor responses along the body in lamprey (pages 3847–3862)

      Li-Ju Hsu, Pavel V. Zelenin, Sten Grillner, Grigori N. Orlovsky and Tatiana G. Deliagina

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23382

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spinal reflex responses to body bending mediated by intraspinal stretch receptor neurons in the lamprey are different along the body. Motoneurons are activated with ipsilateral bending in the rostral part of the body, but with contralateral bending in its middle part. These spinal reflexes can contribute to the control of body configuration during locomotion.

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