Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 521 Issue 18

15 December 2013

Volume 521, Issue 18

Pages Spc1–Spc1, 4095–4369

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Subicular–parahippocampal projections revisited: Development of a complex topography in the rat (page Spc1)

      Kally C. O'Reilly, Annelene Gulden Dahl, Ingvild Ulsaker Kruge and Menno P. Witter

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23483

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    1. Neural convergence and divergence in the mammalian cerebral cortex: From experimental neuroanatomy to functional neuroimaging (pages 4097–4111)

      Kingson Man, Jonas Kaplan, Hanna Damasio and Antonio Damasio

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23408

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      During the last quarter of the twentieth century, detailed patterns of neuronal circuitry were revealed in the mammalian cerebral cortex. These experimental neuroanatomical studies led to the development of neuronal architectures of convergence and divergence and paved the way for modern functional studies of the integration of information across multiple sensory modalities.

    2. Collateral branching of long-distance cortical projections in monkey (pages 4112–4123)

      Kathleen S. Rockland

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23414

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      Axonal branching (collateralization) is accepted as common in rodents. Evidence is reviewed here that some cortical projection systems in monkeys branch to 2–3 different areas. These include temporal feedback and parietal associational projections. Collaterals directly interconnect areas that are also serially interconnected, and may be important for differential timing effects (fig. 20, Ding et al., 2000).

    3. Cholinergic circuitry of the human nucleus basalis and its fate in Alzheimer's disease (pages 4124–4144)

      M.-Marsel Mesulam

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23415

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      This review outlines the behavioral neuroanatomy of the cholinergic pathway that extends from the Ch4 component of the nucleus basalis to the cerebral cortex of the primate brain, its affiliations with the limbic system, and its vulnerability to Alzheimer's disease.

    4. Comparative anatomy of the prosubiculum, subiculum, presubiculum, postsubiculum, and parasubiculum in human, monkey, and rodent (pages 4145–4162)

      Song-Lin Ding

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23416

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      Based on conserved gene expression patterns, and other anatomical features, the author compares five subicular regions in human, monkey and rodent. Previously ignored rodent prosubiculum, and modified subiculum (Sub') and prosubiculum (ProS') in the three species were identified. These findings will make data comparison and analysis much easier across species.

    5. Comparative neuroanatomical parcellation of the human and nonhuman primate temporal pole (pages 4163–4176)

      Ricardo Insausti

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23431

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      Frontomedial view of a human brain. The dotted lines indicate the approximate extension of the exposed temporal polar cortex (TPC). Scale bar equals 1 cm.

    6. Medial temporal cortices in ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (pages 4177–4188)

      Jean C. Augustinack, André J.W. van der Kouwe and Bruce Fischl

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23432

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      Using ex vivo MRI combined with a histological paradigm, the authors show that Nissl and myelin stained tissue validates ultra-high resolution MRI and this approach links the histological ground truth and in vivo brain modeling. Ex vivo MRI optimally models small structures involved in Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Editorial
    4. Reviews
    5. Research Articles
    1. Cingulate area 32 homologies in mouse, rat, macaque and human: Cytoarchitecture and receptor architecture (pages 4189–4204)

      Brent A. Vogt, Patrick R. Hof, Karl Zilles, Leslie J. Vogt, Christina Herold and Nicola Palomero-Gallagher

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23409

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      The comparative organization of two divisions of cingulate area 32 is presented with cytoarchitecture and receptor architecture. AMPA receptor binding co-registered to neuronal somata show that dorsal and pregenual areas (d32 rodents; p32 primates) have a dysgranular layer IV and superficial layers have highest relative AMPA binding in each area.

    2. Terminal distribution of the corticospinal projection from the hand/arm region of the primary motor cortex to the cervical enlargement in rhesus monkey (pages 4205–4235)

      Robert J. Morecraft, Jizhi Ge, Kimberly S. Stilwell-Morecraft, David W. McNeal, Marc A. Pizzimenti and Warren G. Darling

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23410

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      In the cervical enlargement, the corticospinal projection from M1 to lamina VII gradually diminishes progressing caudally whereas the projection gradually increases in lamina IX, where motoneurons of the distal upper extremity are located. This arrangement indicates divergent functional specialization with an emphasis on influencing wrist, hand and digit movements.

    3. Tau–amyloid interactions in the rTgTauEC model of early Alzheimer's disease suggest amyloid-induced disruption of axonal projections and exacerbated axonal pathology (pages 4236–4248)

      Amy M. Pooler, Manuela Polydoro, Susanne K. Wegmann, Rose Pitstick, Kevin R. Kay, Laura Sanchez, George A. Carlson, Teresa Gomez-Isla, Mark W. Albers, Tara L. Spires-Jones and Bradley T. Hyman

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23411

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      Medial entorhinal cortex (EC) neurons synapse locally within the EC and send a projection terminating in the middle molecular layer (MML) of the dentate gyrus (DG). Using a mouse model of early Alzheimer pathology, we show that axonal tau and amyloid plaques contribute to disruption of this pathway including development of dystrophic swelling of axons around plaques and disrupted distribution of EC axon terminals in the MML.

    4. Developmental changes in the spatial organization of neurons in the neocortex of humans and common chimpanzees (pages 4249–4259)

      Kate Teffer, Daniel P. Buxhoeveden, Cheryl D. Stimpson, Archibald J. Fobbs, Steven J. Schapiro, Wallace B. Baze, Mark J. McArthur, William D. Hopkins, Patrick R. Hof, Chet C. Sherwood and Katerina Semendeferi

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23412

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      We examined the development of the spatial organization of neurons in infant and juvenile humans and chimpanzees. We found that area 10 in both species possessed significantly great spacing distance in the post-weaning specimens than in the pre-weaning ones, suggesting that there is a relatively slower maturation of area 10 in both species.

    5. Parallel prefrontal pathways reach distinct excitatory and inhibitory systems in memory-related rhinal cortices (pages 4260–4283)

      Jamie G. Bunce, Basilis Zikopoulos, Marcia Feinberg and Helen Barbas

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23413

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      The primate anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and posterior orbitofrontal cortices (pOFC) innervate different temporal rhinal areas (28, 35 and 36) where they form synapses with excitatory and different populations of inhibitory neurons, expressing calbindin (CB), calretinin (CR) and parvalbumin (PV). These pathway interactions suggest distinct contributions to memory processes.

    6. Subicular–parahippocampal projections revisited: Development of a complex topography in the rat (pages 4284–4299)

      Kally C. O'Reilly, Annelene Gulden Dahl, Ingvild Ulsaker Kruge and Menno P. Witter

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23417

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      Anatomical tracing studies in the juvenile rat reveal that the exquisite topography of connections from the hippocampal output structure, the subiculum, to the parahippocampal regions is present within the first week of life, implying that the subiculum is ready to function in an adult-like manner very early in development.

    7. In vivo parahippocampal white matter pathology as a biomarker of disease progression to Alzheimer's disease (pages 4300–4317)

      Ana Solodkin, E. Elinor Chen, Gary W. Van Hoesen, Lennart Heimer, Ahmed Shereen, Frithjof Kruggel and James Mastrianni

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23418

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      We use MRI-DTI to assess in vivo those elements of parahippocampal neuropathology that in the postmortem brain reflect serious neurodegeneration, in particular the progression of white matter disease from the normal brain to that of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and from MCI to Alzheimer's disease.

    8. Alzheimer's disease pathology in the neocortex and hippocampus of the western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) (pages 4318–4338)

      Sylvia E. Perez, Mary Ann Raghanti, Patrick R. Hof, Lynn Kramer, Milos D. Ikonomovic, Pascale N. Lacor, Joseph M. Erwin, Chet C. Sherwood and Elliott J. Mufson

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23428

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      This study used immunohistochemistry and histochemistry to demonstrate the spontaneous appearance of (A) amyloid beta (Aβ) and (B) tau-like Alzheimer's disease lesions in the neocortex and hippocampus of aged male and female western lowland gorillas. These findings place this species at relevance in the context of AD research.

    9. Comparative survey of the topographical distribution of signature molecular lesions in major neurodegenerative diseases (pages 4339–4355)

      Steven E. Arnold, Jon B. Toledo, Dina H. Appleby, Sharon X. Xie, Li-San Wang, Young Baek, David A. Wolk, Edward B. Lee, Bruce L. Miller, Virginia M.-Y. Lee and John Q. Trojanowski

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23430

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      We compared the distribution of the principal molecular neurodegenerative disease lesions (amyloid-β, tau, α-synuclein, TDP-43) among ten neurodegenerative diseases in a large and uniformly assessed brain collection. Our data highlight the lesion distributions that either overlap or distinguish the diseases in each molecular disease category.

    10. Learning in Alzheimer's disease is facilitated by social interaction (pages 4356–4369)

      Melissa C. Duff, Diana R. Gallegos, Neal J. Cohen and Daniel Tranel

      Version of Record online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23433

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      Across a series of collaborative interactions with a familiar partner, five women with early stage AD displayed significant and enduring learning in a manner indistinguishable from healthy participants. The observed learning here most likely draws on neural resources outside medial temporal lobes. These interactive sessions provide a potent learning environment.

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