Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 522 Issue 4

March 2014

Volume 522, Issue 4

Pages Spc1–Spc1, 731–970

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Label-retaining, quiescent globose basal cells are found in the olfactory epithelium (page Spc1)

      Woochan Jang, Xueyan Chen, Daniel Flis, Margaret Harris and James E. Schwob

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23530

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Research Articles
    1. Label-retaining, quiescent globose basal cells are found in the olfactory epithelium (pages 731–749)

      Woochan Jang, Xueyan Chen, Daniel Flis, Margaret Harris and James E. Schwob

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23470

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Long-term retention of BrdU labels a small subset of globose basal cells (GBCs) in the olfactory epithelium identified as demonstrably neither horizontal basal cells (HBCs) nor neurons (OSNs). GBCs that retain thymidine label are consensus candidate stem cells, by analogy with other epithelia and by virtue of their differentiative multipotency.

    2. Classification of retinal ganglion cells in the southern hemisphere lamprey Geotria australis (Cyclostomata) (pages 750–771)

      Lee Norman Fletcher, João Paulo Coimbra, Jennifer Rodger, Ian C. Potter, Howard S. Gill, Sarah A. Dunlop and Shaun P. Collin

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23441

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      We show seven retinal ganglion cell types in the lamprey, G. australis, using hierarchical clustering and similarity profile analysis of digitally reconstructed, retrogradely labeled retinal ganglion cells. These findings, with previous studies, indicate the visual system of G. australis represents the upper limit of visual complexity in extant agnathans.

    3. Topographic organization of orbitofrontal projections to the parahippocampal region in rats (pages 772–793)

      Hideki Kondo and Menno P. Witter

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23442

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      We examined the topographic organization of orbitofrontal projections to the parahippocampal region in rats with the use of anterograde tracing and visualization. Our findings show that the perirhinal cortex and the lateral entorhinal cortex receive inputs from all subdivisions of the orbitofrontal cortex, whereas the postrhinal cortex and the presubiculum receive inputs mainly from the ventral orbitofrontal area, and the rostral perirhinal cortex receives more substantial orbitofrontal projections than the more caudally located perirhinal cortex.

    4. Comparative mapping of GABA-immunoreactive neurons in the central nervous systems of nudibranch molluscs (pages 794–810)

      Charuni A. Gunaratne, Akira Sakurai and Paul S. Katz

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23446

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      GABA-immunoreactive (GABA-ir) interneurons were mapped in four sea slug species (Mollusca, Opisthobranchia, Nudibranchia). Most of the GABA-ir neurons formed clusters that were recognizable across species indicating strong conservation of the GABAergic system in nudibranchs. Some individual interneurons also could be recognized across species, although none had been previously identified.

    5. Patterns of cortical input to the primary motor area in the marmoset monkey (pages 811–843)

      Kathleen J. Burman, Sophia Bakola, Karyn E. Richardson, David H. Reser and Marcello G.P. Rosa

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23447

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      Using retrograde tracers, the authors quantify the afferent connections to different parts of the motor cortex (M1). They find that M1 is unified by a consistent pattern of major connections, but also shows regional variations in input, which may reflect requirements for control of voluntary movement involving different body parts.

    6. Variable temporoinsular cortex neuroanatomy in primates suggests a bottleneck effect in eastern gorillas (pages 844–860)

      Sarah K. Barks, Amy L. Bauernfeind, Christopher J. Bonar, Michael R. Cranfield, Alexandra A. de Sousa, Joseph M. Erwin, William D. Hopkins, Albert H. Lewandowski, Antoine Mudakikwa, Kimberley A. Phillips, Mary Ann Raghanti, Cheryl D. Stimpson, Patrick R. Hof, Karl Zilles and Chet C. Sherwood

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23448

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      We describe a fusion between temporal and insular cortices that is relatively rare in primates but has become more common in eastern gorillas, possibly as the result of a population bottleneck effect. Characterizing the phylogenetic distribution of this morphology highlights a derived feature of these great apes.

    7. Connexin 35b expression in the spinal cord of Danio rerio embryos and larvae (pages 861–875)

      Tara C. Carlisle and Angeles B. Ribera

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23449

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      We determined the temporal and spatial expression pattern of zebrafish connexin 35b (cx35b), orthologue to mammalian connexin 36, during embryonic and early larval stages. Our analyses consisted of RT-PCR, fluorescent RNA in situ hybridization, and transient transgenic expression. We identified secondary motor neurons and circumferential descending excitatory premotor interneurons as cx35b-expressing cells, suggesting a role for Cx35b-containing electrical synapses in motor function of zebrafish embryos and early larvae.

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      Rax regulates hypothalamic tanycyte differentiation and barrier function in mice (pages 876–899)

      Ana L. Miranda-Angulo, Mardi S. Byerly, Janny Mesa, Hong Wang and Seth Blackshaw

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23451

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      Rax haploinsufficient mice feature a thinner hypothalamic ventricular zone, the ectopic presence of ependymal cells in the α2 tanycytic zone, and reduced diffusion of Evans blue tracer from the cerebrospinal fluid into the hypothalamic parenchyma. These findings suggests that Rax helps control the differentiation and function of hypothalamic tanycytes.

    9. Structural organization and function of mouse photoreceptor ribbon synapses involve the immunoglobulin protein synaptic cell adhesion molecule 1 (pages 900–920)

      Adema Ribic, Xinran Liu, Michael C. Crair and Thomas Biederer

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23452

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      Using a variety of methods, the authors demonstrate that cell adhesion molecule SynCAM 1 mediates the organization and function of photoreceptor ribbon synapses. This study suggests that the absence of SynCAM 1 leads to impaired photoreceptor responses to visual stimuli in the scotopic visual pathway.

    10. Electron tomography on γ-aminobutyric acid-ergic synapses reveals a discontinuous postsynaptic network of filaments (pages 921–936)

      Alexander E. Linsalata, Xiaobing Chen, Christine A. Winters and Thomas S. Reese

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23453

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      Filaments within the postsynaptic cytoplasm at γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic synapses connect to form multifilament complexes beneath the postsynaptic membrane (rendered in gray), as revealed by electron tomography. Each complex is discrete and rendered in a different color. Complexes often contact the membrane but do not contact each other, suggesting that GABAergic postsynaptic specializations are less integrated and less rigidly organized than glutamatergic postsynaptic densities.

    11. Tonotopic organization of vertical cells in the dorsal cochlear nucleus of the CBA/J mouse (pages 937–949)

      Michael A. Muniak and David K. Ryugo

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23454

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vertical cells of the dorsal cochlear nucleus were labeled via physiologically targeted injections in the anteroventral cochlear nucleus. By merging the results of multiple experimental cases to a single cochlear nucleus model, the authors demonstrate that vertical cells are tonotopically organized in the dorsal cochlear nucleus.

    12. The cross-modal aspect of mouse visual cortex plasticity induced by monocular enucleation is age dependent (pages 950–970)

      Julie Nys, Jeroen Aerts, Ellen Ytebrouck, Samme Vreysen, Annelies Laeremans and Lutgarde Arckens

      Version of Record online: 15 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.23455

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using in situ hybridization detection of the activity reporter gene zif268 as a readout of changing neuronal activation in the neocortex of the mouse, the authors discovered a presensitive period for cross-modal plasticity in the mouse visual cortex following monocular enucleation, in which a gradual recruitment of cross-modal recovery coincides with the transition (P90) from adolescence (P45) to adulthood (P120).

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