Journal of Comparative Neurology

Cover image for Vol. 525 Issue 15

October 15, 2017

Volume 525, Issue 15

Pages spc1–spc1, 3175–3387

  1. COVER IMAGE

    1. Top of page
    2. COVER IMAGE
    3. ISSUE INFORMATION - TOC
    4. RESEARCH ARTICLE
    5. TOOLBOX
    6. REVIEW
    7. RESEARCH ARTICLES
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      Phenotyping of nNOS neurons in the postnatal and adult female mouse hypothalamus (page spc1)

      Konstantina Chachlaki, Samuel A. Malone, Emily Qualls-Creekmore, Erik Hrabovszky, Heike Münzberg, Paolo Giacobini, Fabrice Ango and Vincent Prevot

      Version of Record online: 17 AUG 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24298

  2. ISSUE INFORMATION - TOC

    1. Top of page
    2. COVER IMAGE
    3. ISSUE INFORMATION - TOC
    4. RESEARCH ARTICLE
    5. TOOLBOX
    6. REVIEW
    7. RESEARCH ARTICLES
    1. You have free access to this content
  3. RESEARCH ARTICLE

    1. Top of page
    2. COVER IMAGE
    3. ISSUE INFORMATION - TOC
    4. RESEARCH ARTICLE
    5. TOOLBOX
    6. REVIEW
    7. RESEARCH ARTICLES
    1. Phenotyping of nNOS neurons in the postnatal and adult female mouse hypothalamus (pages 3177–3189)

      Konstantina Chachlaki, Samuel A. Malone, Emily Qualls-Creekmore, Erik Hrabovszky, Heike Münzberg, Paolo Giacobini, Fabrice Ango and Vincent Prevot

      Version of Record online: 19 JUN 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24257

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The study employs fluorescent immunohistochemistry to analyze the distribution of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and estrogen receptor alpha in the female mouse hypothalamus during postnatal development and in adulthood. Furthermore, transgenic reporter mice are used to further characterize the neurochemical phenotype of nNOS neurons in the hypothalamus.

  4. TOOLBOX

    1. Top of page
    2. COVER IMAGE
    3. ISSUE INFORMATION - TOC
    4. RESEARCH ARTICLE
    5. TOOLBOX
    6. REVIEW
    7. RESEARCH ARTICLES
    1. Catlas: An magnetic resonance imaging-based three-dimensional cortical atlas and tissue probability maps for the domestic cat (Felis catus) (pages 3190–3206)

      Daniel Stolzberg, Carmen Wong, Blake E. Butler and Stephen G. Lomber

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24271

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Here, we describe the generation of a cortical volumetric atlas for the domestic cat based on a nonlinear warped average of eight cat brains using high-field structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We have also generated gray matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid tissue probability maps for the automated segmentation of tissue types in the cat brain using T1-contrast MRI volumes. The tools provided here, the first of their kind for the cat, can be used to accurately localize evoked functional MRI responses as well for functional connectivity analysis.

  5. REVIEW

    1. Top of page
    2. COVER IMAGE
    3. ISSUE INFORMATION - TOC
    4. RESEARCH ARTICLE
    5. TOOLBOX
    6. REVIEW
    7. RESEARCH ARTICLES
    1. The evolution and functions of nuclei of the visual pulvinar in primates (pages 3207–3226)

      Mary K.L. Baldwin, Pooja Balaram and Jon H. Kaas

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24272

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review explores the organization and evolution of the pulvinar complex across mammals with a focus on primates and their close relatives including rodents.

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLES

    1. Top of page
    2. COVER IMAGE
    3. ISSUE INFORMATION - TOC
    4. RESEARCH ARTICLE
    5. TOOLBOX
    6. REVIEW
    7. RESEARCH ARTICLES
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Monosynaptic retrograde tracing of neurons expressing the G-protein coupled receptor Gpr151 in the mouse brain (pages 3227–3250)

      Jonas Broms, Matilda Grahm, Lea Haugegaard, Thomas Blom, Konstantinos Meletis and Anders Tingström

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24273

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Primary afferents to populations of neurons expressing the orphan receptor GPR151 in the habenula and thalamus, visualized by pseudorabies viral tracing, were primarily detected in pallidal, hypothalamic, and striatal structures. Distinct differences were apparent, indicating that Gpr151-expressing neurons is a heterogeneous population.

    2. The significance of negative correlations in brain connectivity (pages 3251–3265)

      Liang Zhan, Lisanne M. Jenkins, Ouri E. Wolfson, Johnson Jonaris GadElkarim, Kevin Nocito, Paul M. Thompson, Olusola A. Ajilore, Moo K. Chung and Alex D. Leow

      Version of Record online: 16 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24274

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      During the resting state, sex differences in the functional connectome are localized to the temporal lobe (including the middle temporal gyrus, amygdala, and hippocampus) and are likely related to known sex-specific cognitive strategies for recalling autobiographic memories.

    3. Parvalbumin-expressing ependymal cells in rostral lateral ventricle wall adhesions contribute to aging-related ventricle stenosis in mice (pages 3266–3285)

      Federica Filice, Marco R. Celio, Alexandre Babalian, Walter Blum and Viktoria Szabolcsi

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24276

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
      • Parvalbumin-expressing reactive ependymal cells are present in the adhering walls of the lateral ventricles at the early stages of aging-associated ventricle stenosis.
      • PV+ reactive ependymal cells are implicated in the progression of ventricle stenosis, which is a major cause of the decline of SVZ-supported neurogenesis in aged mice.
    4. Cerebellins are differentially expressed in selective subsets of neurons throughout the brain (pages 3286–3311)

      Erica Seigneur and Thomas C. Südhof

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24278

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The authors developed knockin reporter mice to map the expression patterns of the trans-synaptic cell-adhesion molecules Cbln2 and Cbln4. The analysis revealed that the Cblns are largely expressed in non-overlapping excitatory neurons in a subset of nuclei throughout the brain.

    5. Cortical inter-hemispheric circuits for multimodal vocal learning in songbirds (pages 3312–3340)

      Amy K. Paterson and Sarah W. Bottjer

      Version of Record online: 25 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24280

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Anterograde and retrograde tracing experiments demonstrated inter-hemispheric circuits that integrate multi-sensory inputs with cortical pathways for vocal learning and behavior in songbirds. These novel circuits are well-suited to mediate social interactions and coordinate bilateral song-related neural activity.

    6. Proteomic analyses of nucleus laminaris identified candidate targets of the fragile X mental retardation protein (pages 3341–3359)

      Hitomi Sakano, Diego A. R. Zorio, Xiaoyu Wang, Ying S. Ting, William S. Noble, Michael J. MacCoss, Edwin W Rubel and Yuan Wang

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Using micro laser capture and mass spectrometry, we provide a list of putative fragile X mental retardation protein targets specific to an auditory structure important for binaural processing. As verified by immunocytochemistry and RNA binding assays, these targets are potential players in the abnormal auditory processing of fragile X syndrome.

    7. The stability of the transcriptome during the estrous cycle in four regions of the mouse brain (pages 3360–3387)

      Lisa M. DiCarlo, Cynthia Vied and Richard S. Nowakowski

      Version of Record online: 24 JUL 2017 | DOI: 10.1002/cne.24282

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We examined gene expression changes in four regions of the female mouse brain during the estrous cycle. We found differences in the total number of DEGs between brain regions as well as differences within each region that occur as a result of the four consecutive stage transitions.

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