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Transient stress-based and strain-based hemolysis estimation in a simplified blood pump

Authors

  • Lutz Pauli,

    1. Chair for Computational Analysis of Technical Systems (CATS), RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen, Germany
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  • Jaewook Nam,

    1. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA
    2. School of Chemical Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Jangan-gu, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 Korea
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  • Matteo Pasquali,

    1. Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005, USA
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  • Marek Behr

    Corresponding author
    1. Chair for Computational Analysis of Technical Systems (CATS), RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen, Germany
    • Correspondence to: Marek Behr, Chair for Computational Analysis of Technical Systems (CATS), RWTH Aachen University, 52056 Aachen, Germany, and Matteo Pasquali, Department of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005, USA.

      E-mail: behr@cats.rwth-aachen.de and mp@rice.edu

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SUMMARY

We compare two approaches to numerical estimation of mechanical hemolysis in a simplified blood pump model. The stress-based model relies on the instantaneous shear stress in the blood flow, whereas the strain-based model uses an additional tensor equation to relate distortion of red blood cells to a shear stress measure. We use the newly proposed least-squares finite element method (LSFEM) to prevent negative concentration fields and show a stable and volume preserving LSFEM for the tensor equation. Application of both models to a simplified centrifugal blood pump at three different operating conditions shows that the stress-based model overestimates the rate of hemolysis. The strain-based model is found to deliver lower hemolysis rates because it incorporates a more detailed description of biophysical phenomena into the simulation process. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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