International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 28 Issue 10

Special Issue: Computational and Numerical Modelling in Neuromechanics and Biomechanics

October 2012

Volume 28, Issue 10

Pages 1001–1081

Issue edited by: Professor Thomas Franz

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    4. Research Articles
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  2. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Review and perspective: neuromechanical considerations for predicting muscle activation patterns for movement (pages 1003–1014)

      Lena H. Ting, Stacie A. Chvatal, Seyed A. Safavynia and J. Lucas McKay

      Version of Record online: 16 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2485

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Muscle coordination may be impossible to predict accurately based on biomechanical considerations alone because of redundancy in the musculoskeletal system. Here, we present a review of recent work demonstrating that muscle activation patterns may reflect a hierarchical and low-dimensional structure of neuromotor outputs that reflect control of task-level goals. Understanding the goals and organization of the neural control of movement may provide useful reduced dimension parameter sets to address the degrees-of-freedom problem in musculoskeletal movement control.

    2. Neuromechanic: A computational platform for simulation and analysis of the neural control of movement (pages 1015–1027)

      Nathan E. Bunderson, Jeffrey T. Bingham, M. Hongchul Sohn, Lena H. Ting and Thomas J. Burkholder

      Version of Record online: 17 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2486

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We have developed an intrinsically forward computational platform (Neuromechanic, www.neuromechanic.com) that explicitly represents the interdependencies among rigid body dynamics, frictional contact, muscle mechanics, and neural control modules. This formulation has significant advantages for optimization and forward simulation, particularly with application to neural controllers with feedback or regulatory features.

  3. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Review Articles
    4. Research Articles
    1. Inspiration from nature: dynamic modelling of the musculoskeletal structure of the seahorse tail (pages 1028–1042)

      Tomas Praet, Dominique Adriaens, Sofie Van Cauter, Bert Masschaele, Matthieu De Beule and Benedict Verhegghe

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2499

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      The seahorse tail demonstrates a remarkable combination of radial stiffness and bending flexibility. We therefore constructed a versatile dynamic model of the seahorse tail in order to study the biomechanics of this specialised musculoskeletal structure. The insights derived from the model can inspire the design of innovative applications in biomedical engineering.

    2. Evaluation of carotid stent scaffolding through patient-specific finite element analysis (pages 1043–1055)

      F. Auricchio, M. Conti, M. Ferraro and A. Reali

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2509

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      Vessel scaffolding is usually measured as the cell area of the stent in free-expanded configuration, neglecting thus the actual stent configuration within the vascular anatomy. In this study, we measure the cell area of four different stent designs deployed in a realistic carotid artery model through patient-specific finite element analysis. The results suggest that after deployment, the cell area change along the stent length and the related reduction with respect to the free-expanded configuration are functions of the vessel tapering.

    3. Mechanics of the foot Part 1: A continuum framework for evaluating soft tissue stiffening in the pathologic foot (pages 1056–1070)

      J.W. Fernandez, M.Z. Ul Haque, P.J. Hunter and K. Mithraratne

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2494

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      An anatomically-based foot modelling framework is used to explore the influence of tissue stiffening typically observed in diabetes or gout. The model is derived from the Physiome project repository with anisotropic material properties embedded in a subject-specific customised continuum. Motion capture was used for bone kinematics and an emed® pressure platform for surface pressure validation. Predicted internal stresses increased at a higher rate than surface pressures, indicating that internal pathology may arise before changes at the foot surface.

    4. Mechanics of the foot Part 2: A coupled solid–fluid model to investigate blood transport in the pathologic foot (pages 1071–1081)

      K. Mithraratne, H. Ho, P.J. Hunter and J.W. Fernandez

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2493

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      A coupled computational model consisting of a soft tissue continuum and an embedded network of major arteries of the foot is developed to investigate blood flow under normal and pathologic conditions. The hydrostatic pressure distribution within the tissue is determined by its mechanical properties and acts on the external surface of the arteries. Simulation results reveal that a twofold increase in tissue stiffness results in about 28% reduction in blood supply to the affected region for the same loading conditions.

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