International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 29 Issue 2

Special Issue: Patient Specific Modelling

February 2013

Volume 29, Issue 2

Pages 147–308

Issue edited by: Peter Hoskins, Barry Doyle, Pankaj Pankaj, Perumal Nithiarasu

  1. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. On the influence of patient-specific material properties in computational simulations: A case study of a large ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (pages 150–164)

      Barry J. Doyle, Anthony Callanan, Pierce A. Grace and Eamon G. Kavanagh

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2515

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) wall tissue and intraluminal thrombus (ILT) were harvested during surgery and then mechanically tested. This data was used in a finite element analysis (FEA) patient-specific model with measured, non-uniform, wall thickness.

      Tissue was much weaker than population-based data and significantly influenced numerical results. Rupture indices depend on the accuracy of the underlying computational simulation.

      Care should be taken when developing AAA rupture indices as there can be large inter-patient and intra-patient variation in tissue behaviour.

    2. Comparison of patient-specific inlet boundary conditions in the numerical modelling of blood flow in abdominal aortic aneurysm disease (pages 165–178)

      David Hardman, Scott I. Semple, Jennifer M.J. Richards and Peter R. Hoskins

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2535

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The objective of the study was to investigate differences in flow patterns and wall shear stress in abdominal aortic aneurysm for different flow–inlet boundary conditions. Three inlet boundary condition datasets were derived from phase-contrast MRI. The three inlet conditions are: (i) 3-component two-dimensional (2D) velocity profiles, (ii) 1-component 2D velocity profiles, and (iii) 2D velocity profiles based on a solution to the Womersley equations based on integrated flow rate waveform.

    3. Hemodynamic variations due to spiral blood flow through four patient-specific bifurcated stent graft configurations for the treatment of abdominal aortic aneurysms (pages 179–196)

      Florian Stefanov, Tim McGloughlin, Patrick Delassus and Liam Morris

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2525

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Four patients specific CT-scanned bifurcated stent grafts (SGs) with twisted and non-twisted leg configurations were modelled computationally with and without the addition of the full human aorta. The complexity of the flow patterns and secondary flows were influenced by the inclusion of the aorta at the SG's proximal section. Significant recirculations occurred along all SGs during the deceleration phase. The inclusion of the full human aorta did not impact the velocity contours within the distal legs.

    4. Treatment planning for a TCPC test case: A numerical investigation under rigid and moving wall assumptions (pages 197–216)

      Lucia Mirabella, Christopher M. Haggerty, Tiziano Passerini, Marina Piccinelli, Andrew J. Powell, Pedro J. Del Nido, Alessandro Veneziani and Ajit P. Yoganathan

      Version of Record online: 29 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2517

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this work, we simulate three types of intervention on a Fontan patient case study, and compare their predicted outcome with baseline conditions: decrease in pulmonary vascular resistance; surgical revision of the connection design; and introduction of a fenestration in the vessel wall. The simulations are performed both with rigid wall assumption and including patient-specific wall motion, reconstructed from a 4DMRI data set. The results show the effect of each option on clinically important metrics and highlight the impact of patient-specific wall motion.

    5. A computationally efficient framework for the simulation of cardiac perfusion using a multi-compartment Darcy porous-media flow model (pages 217–232)

      C. Michler, A. N. Cookson, R. Chabiniok, E. Hyde, J. Lee, M. Sinclair, T. Sochi, A. Goyal, G. Vigueras, D. A. Nordsletten and N. P Smith

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2520

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We present a method to efficiently simulate coronary perfusion within clinically relevant time frames and demonstrate this on a subject-specific model of the left ventricle with geometry, inflow rates and source locations derived from experimental data. Perfusion is modeled as a multicompartment Darcy porous-media flow, where each compartment encapsulates the spatial scales of the vascular network in a certain range. Reducing the N-compartment system of Darcy equations to N pressure equations and N subsequent projection problems to recover the Darcy velocity significantly enhances computational efficiency.

  3. Review Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. Patient-specific modelling of bone and bone-implant systems: the challenges (pages 233–249)

      Pankaj Pankaj

      Version of Record online: 26 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2536

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The study reviews the status of patient-specific modelling with reference to defining material behaviour and prescribing boundary conditions and interactions. It finds that for elastic behaviour, image-based assignment of properties is being increasingly employed, and for post-elastic behaviour, strain-based plasticity has the potential of reducing patient specificity. Interference fit between bone and implant can induce considerable prestrain that needs to be included to predict interface behaviour and inclusion of realistic boundary conditions that incorporate muscles and ligaments remains a challenge.

    2. Towards patient-specific material modeling of trabecular bone post-yield behavior (pages 250–272)

      Roberto Carretta, Silvio Lorenzetti and Ralph Müller

      Version of Record online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2516

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This research reviews and determines the state of the art in patient-specific material modeling of the mechanical behavior of trabecular bone. It evaluates the connection between experiments and modeling to better assess the future research direction of these two areas. It also highlights the role of the hierarchical structure of bone and the interplay between each level.

    3. Accounting for patient variability in finite element analysis of the intact and implanted hip and knee: A review (pages 273–292)

      Mark Taylor, Rebecca Bryan and Francis Galloway

      Version of Record online: 18 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2530

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Finite element analysis is commonly used to assess the performance of total joint replacements, but it is becoming increasingly difficult to differentiate them using conventional modelling techniques. There are significant differences in morphology and bone properties between patients, and accounting for this variability will lead to better assessment of the risk of failure. This paper provides a comprehensive overview of the techniques available to account for patient variability and their associated limitations.

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Editorial
    3. Research Articles
    4. Review Articles
    5. Research Articles
    1. Patient-specific computational biomechanics of the brain without segmentation and meshing (pages 293–308)

      Johnny Y. Zhang, Grand Roman Joldes, Adam Wittek and Karol Miller

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2507

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this paper, we present a new method of constructing patient-specific biomechanical models for brain deformation computation that does not require segmentation and meshing. The proposed mesh-free solution method uses a cloud of points for shape function definition, a regular background mesh for integration, and extracts material properties information directly from the image using a fuzzy tissue classification. We assess the accuracy of the proposed model against a finite element model for a brain shift simulation. The proposed model gives, for all practical purposes, equivalent results to the finite element model.

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