International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering

Cover image for Vol. 29 Issue 8

August 2013

Volume 29, Issue 8

Pages 807–884

  1. Special Issue Paper - Numerical Methods and Applications of Multi-Physics in Biomechanical Modeling

    1. Top of page
    2. Special Issue Paper - Numerical Methods and Applications of Multi-Physics in Biomechanical Modeling
    3. Paper Presented at WCCM 2012 - 10th World Congress on Computational Mechanics
    1. Modeling sample/patient-specific structural and diffusional responses of cartilage using DT-MRI (pages 807–821)

      D. M. Pierce, T. Ricken and G. A. Holzapfel

      Article first published online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2524

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We propose a new 3D biphasic, finite strain constitutive model and show representative finite element results for an indentation experiment with an impermeable, plane-ended cylinder of diameter 1 mm compressing a cartilage sample to 1% global strain in 150 s-column 1: normal Green-Lagrange strain in the axial (indentation) direction; column 2: interstitial fluid pressure; column 3: von Mises stress; row 1: constitutive model including patient-specific collagen fiber network and inhomogeneous material properties; row 2: model without collagen fiber network and homogeneous material properties. For the tissue sample investigated, through-thickness inhomogeneity of both the collagen fiber network and the material properties maintains interstitial fluid pressure underneath the indenter at the cartilage surface and reduces tissue stress.

    2. A finite element-based constrained mixture implementation for arterial growth, remodeling, and adaptation: Theory and numerical verification (pages 822–849)

      A. Valentín, J.D. Humphrey and G.A. Holzapfel

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2555

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We present an extended constrained mixture model of arterial growth and remodeling implemented within a nonlinear finite element framework. The model transcends prior approaches by consistently postulating local mechanobiological processes that can recover arterial homeostasis in normalcy but may lead to complex emerging behaviors in response to perturbations. The implementation recovers results from a prior semi-analytic model and is applicable to more complex cases of arterial G&R.

    3. Multiphysics computational models for cardiac flow and virtual cardiography (pages 850–869)

      Jung Hee Seo, Vijay Vedula, Theodore Abraham and Rajat Mittal

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2556

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multiphysics simulation approach is developed for predicting cardiac flows as well as for conducting virtual echocardiography and phonocardiography of those flows. Intraventricular blood flow in pathological heart conditions is simulated by solving the three-dimensional incompressible Navier–Stokes equations with an immersed boundary method, and using this computational hemodynamic data, echocardiographic and phonocardiographic signals are synthesized by separate simulations that model the physics of ultrasound wave scattering and flow-induced sound, respectively.

  2. Paper Presented at WCCM 2012 - 10th World Congress on Computational Mechanics

    1. Top of page
    2. Special Issue Paper - Numerical Methods and Applications of Multi-Physics in Biomechanical Modeling
    3. Paper Presented at WCCM 2012 - 10th World Congress on Computational Mechanics
    1. Outcomes of myocardial infarction hydrogel injection therapy in the human left ventricle dependent on injectate distribution (pages 870–884)

      Renee Miller, Neil H. Davies, Jeroen Kortsmit, Peter Zilla and Thomas Franz

      Article first published online: 3 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cnm.2551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Layered and bulk therapeutic intra-myocardial injectates were studied in acute and fibrotic cardiac infarcts utilising a human patient-specific left ventricular geometry. Compared to the healthy case, injectates reduced the end-systolic infarct myofibre stress from 290% to approximately 115% in the fibrotic case and from 90% to between 20% and 30% in the acute case. The layered injectate was more beneficial in the acute infarct whereas the bulk injectate was superior in the fibrotic infarct agreeing with previous in vivo findings.

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