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A Joint Theoretical–Experimental Investigation of the Faraday Effect in Benzene, Toluene, and p-Xylene

Authors

  • Edith Botek Dr.,

    1. Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique Appliquée, Facultés Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix rue de Bruxelles, 61, 5000 Namur, Belgium, Fax: (+32) 81 724567
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  • Benoît Champagne Dr.,

    1. Laboratoire de Chimie Théorique Appliquée, Facultés Universitaires Notre-Dame de la Paix rue de Bruxelles, 61, 5000 Namur, Belgium, Fax: (+32) 81 724567
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  • Thierry Verbiest Prof.,

    1. Laboratory of Chemical and Biological Dynamics, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
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  • Palash Gangopadhyay  Dr.,

    1. Laboratory of Chemical and Biological Dynamics, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
    2. College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 630 East University Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721-0094, USA
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  • André Persoons  Prof.

    1. Laboratory of Chemical and Biological Dynamics, University of Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven, Belgium
    2. College of Optical Sciences, University of Arizona, 630 East University Boulevard, Tucson, Arizona 85721-0094, USA
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Abstract

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Dispersion of the Verdet constant is determined experimentally and theoretically for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene as pure liquids. Both theory and experiment show that the amplitude of the Verdet constant decreases when methyl groups are added to the benzene ring, due to the decreasing number density with the increasing size of the molecule. The picture shows the Verdet constants of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene as a function of wavelength and compares theory with experiment.

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