Discrete Arrays of Liquid-Crystal-Supported Proteolipid Monolayers as Phantom Cell Surfaces

Authors

  • Amber R. Wise,

    1. University of California Berkeley, Chemistry Department, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA), Fax: (+1) 510-666-3603
    2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Physical Biosciences Division and Materials Science Division, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
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  • Jeffrey A. Nye,

    1. University of California Berkeley, Chemical Engineering Department, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
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  • Jay T. Groves Prof.

    1. University of California Berkeley, Chemistry Department, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA), Fax: (+1) 510-666-3603
    2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, Physical Biosciences Division and Materials Science Division, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (USA)
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Abstract

The phospholipid bilayers of living cell membranes exist almost universally in a liquid state. This enables motion and spatial reorganization of membrane components on multiple length scales, which is an essential feature of many biological processes. There is great interest in the development of molecularly defined interfaces between synthetic materials and living cells. To this end, there is a need for solid substrate materials that can be derivatized with fluid, membrane-like interfaces. Herein, we describe array fabrication of discrete liquid-crystal areas supporting phospholipid monolayer membranes, and characterize the interactions with several different membrane surface proteins [avidin series, cholera toxin, green fluorescent protein (GFP), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM) and major histocompatibility complex (MHC)]. Three different linkage strategies (biotin, nickel chelating lipids complexing with histidine, and the choleratoxin binding unit (CTB) associating with GM1 are evaluated. Additionally, experiments with live immunological T cells forming active synapses at the interface exhibit the specific nature of the surface.

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