Modeling of Current Distribution on Smooth and Columnar Platinum Structures

Authors

  • Prof. Carlos F. Zinola

    Corresponding author
    1. Electrochemical Engineering Group, Fundamental Electrochemistry Laboratory, UDELAR, J. E. Rodó Street No. 1843, Montevideo (Uruguay), Fax: (+59) 82 2525 07 49
    • Electrochemical Engineering Group, Fundamental Electrochemistry Laboratory, UDELAR, J. E. Rodó Street No. 1843, Montevideo (Uruguay), Fax: (+59) 82 2525 07 49
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Abstract

Studying the growth and stability of anisotropic or isotropic disordered surfaces in electrodeposition is of importance in catalytic electrochemistry. In some cases, the metallic nature of the electrode defines the topography and roughness, which are also controlled by the experimental time and applied external potential. Because of the experimental restrictions in conventional electrochemical techniques and ex situ electron microscopies, a theoretical model of the surface geometry could aid in understanding the electrodeposition process and current distributions. In spite of applying a complex theory such as dynamic scaling method or perturbation theories, the resolution of mixed mass-/charge-transfer equations (tertiary distribution) for the electrodeposition process would give reliable information. One of the main problems with this type of distribution is the mathematics when solving the spatial n-dimensional differential equations. Use of a primary current distribution is proposed here to simplify the differential equations; however it limits wide application of the first assumption. Distributions of concentration profile, current density, and electrode potential are presented here as a function of the distance normal to the surface for the cases of smooth and rough platinum growth. In the particular case of columnar surfaces, cycloid curves are used to model the electrode, from which the concentration profile is presented in a parameterized form after solving a first-type curvilinear integral. The concentration contour results in a combination of a trigonometric inverse function and a linear distribution leading to a negative concavity curve. The calculation of the current density and electrode potential contours also show trigonometric shapes exhibiting forbidden imaginary values only at the minimal values of the trochoid curve.

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