How Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Imaging Improves the Understanding of Protein Interaction Networks in Cancer Biology

Authors

  • Dr. Gilbert O. Fruhwirth,

    Corresponding author
    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
    2. Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, New Hunt's House, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
    • Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
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  • Dr. Luis P. Fernandes,

    1. Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
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  • Dr. Gregory Weitsman,

    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
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  • Dr. Gargi Patel,

    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
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  • Dr. Muireann Kelleher,

    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
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  • Dr. Katherine Lawler,

    1. Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, New Hunt's House, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
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  • Adrian Brock,

    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
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  • Dr. Simon P. Poland,

    1. Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, New Hunt's House, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
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  • Dr. Daniel R. Matthews,

    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
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  • Prof. György Kéri,

    1. Vichem Chemie Research Ltd. Herman Ottó utca 15, Budapest, Hungary and Pathobiochemistry Research Group of Hungarian Academy of Science, Semmelweis University, Budapest, 1444 Bp 8. POB 260 (Hungary)
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  • Dr. Paul R. Barber,

    1. Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (UK)
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  • Prof. Borivoj Vojnovic,

    1. Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
    2. Gray Institute for Radiation Oncology & Biology, University of Oxford, Old Road Campus Research Building, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7DQ (UK)
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  • Dr. Simon M. Ameer-Beg,

    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
    2. Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
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  • Prof. Anthony C. C. Coolen,

    1. Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
    2. Department of Mathematics, King's College London, Strand Campus, London, WC2R 2LS (UK)
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  • Dr. Franca Fraternali,

    1. Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
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  • Prof. Tony Ng

    Corresponding author
    1. Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
    2. Randall Division of Cell & Molecular Biophysics, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
    3. Comprehensive Cancer Imaging Centre, New Hunt's House, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK)
    • Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Division of Cancer Studies, King's College London, Guy's Medical School Campus, NHH, SE1 1UL (UK), Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 6220, Fax: (+44) (0) 20 7848 8056
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Abstract

Herein we discuss how FRET imaging can contribute at various stages to delineate the function of the proteome. Therefore, we briefly describe FRET imaging techniques, the selection of suitable FRET pairs and potential caveats. Furthermore, we discuss state-of-the-art FRET-based screening approaches (underpinned by protein interaction network analysis using computational biology) and preclinical intravital FRET-imaging techniques that can be used for functional validation of candidate hits (nodes and edges) from the network screen, as well as measurement of the efficacy of perturbing these nodes/edges by short hairpin RNA (shRNA) and/or small molecule-based approaches.

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