Cover Picture: The Reaction Microscope: Imaging and Pulse Shaping Control in Photodynamics (ChemPhysChem 8/2011)

Authors

  • Dr. Arno Vredenborg,

    1. LaserLaB Amsterdam and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Fax: (+31) 20-5987643
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  • C. Stefan Lehmann,

    1. LaserLaB Amsterdam and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Fax: (+31) 20-5987643
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  • Dr. Daniel Irimia,

    1. LaserLaB Amsterdam and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Fax: (+31) 20-5987643
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  • Dr. Wim G. Roeterdink,

    1. LaserLaB Amsterdam and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Fax: (+31) 20-5987643
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  • Prof. Dr. Maurice H. M. Janssen

    Corresponding author
    1. LaserLaB Amsterdam and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Fax: (+31) 20-5987643
    • LaserLaB Amsterdam and Department of Chemistry, Vrije Universiteit, de Boelelaan 1083, 1081 HV Amsterdam (The Netherlands), Fax: (+31) 20-5987643
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Abstract

original image

Jacobus van't Hoff proposed in 1874 that molecules have three-dimensional structures. The three-dimensional shape of molecules is responsible for many of their chemical and physical properties, such as the optical rotation of light. The cover picture illustrates a novel reaction microscope that was developed at LaserLaB Amsterdam to study and control molecular photodynamics. It employs advanced single-particle imaging detectors that measure the full three-dimensional velocity distribution of correlated electrons and (fragment) ions emitted from an excited molecule. Shaped femtosecond laser fields are used to control and manipulate the dynamics in the excited molecule in order to steer the outcome of the photochemical reaction. Recent experimental results are reviewed by M. H. M. Janssen and coworkers on p. 1459, illustrating the wealth of detailed information that can be obtained about the interplay between shaped laser fields, femtosecond dynamics, ionization processes and multichannel pathways in three-dimensional (chiral) molecules.

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