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Specific Transport of Target Molecules by Motor Proteins in Microfluidic Channels

Authors

  • Dr. Mehmet C. Tarhan,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 3 5452 6250
    • Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 3 5452 6250
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  • Prof. Ryuji Yokokawa,

    1. Dept. of Microengineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)
    2. PRESTO, JST, 4-1-8, Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)
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  • Dr. Fabrice O. Morin,

    1. LIMMS/CNRS-IIS (UMI 2820), The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan)
    2. Current address: Tecnalia Research & Innovation, Paseo Mikeletegi 2, San Sebastian 20009 (Spain)
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  • Prof. Hiroyuki Fujita

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 3 5452 6250
    • Institute of Industrial Science, The University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 3 5452 6250
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Abstract

Direct transport powered by motor proteins can alleviate the challenges presented by miniaturization of microfluidic systems. There have been several recent attempts to build motor-protein-driven transport systems based on simple capturing or transport mechanisms. However, to achieve a multifunctional device for practical applications, a more complex sorting/transport system should be realized. Herein, the proof of concept of a sorting device employing selective capture of distinct target molecules and transport of the sorted molecules to different predefined directions is presented. By combining the bottom-up functionality of biological systems with the top-down handling capabilities of micro-electromechanical systems technology, highly selective molecular recognition and motor-protein-based transport is integrated in a microfluidic channel network.

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