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Sodium-Ion Battery based on an Electrochemically Converted NaFePO4 Cathode and Nanostructured Tin–Carbon Anode

Authors

  • Ivana Hasa,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome (Italy)
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  • Dr. Jusef Hassoun,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome (Italy)
    • Jusef Hassoun, Department of Chemistry, University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome (Italy)===

      Bruno Scrosati, Italian Institute of Technology, Via Morego, 30 16163 Genova, (Italy)===

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  • Prof. Yang-Kook Sun,

    1. Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul, 133-791, (South Korea)
    2. Department of Chemistry, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)
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  • Prof. Bruno Scrosati

    Corresponding author
    1. Italian Institute of Technology, Via Morego, 30 16163 Genova, (Italy)
    • Jusef Hassoun, Department of Chemistry, University of Rome Sapienza, Piazzale Aldo Moro, 5, 00185, Rome (Italy)===

      Bruno Scrosati, Italian Institute of Technology, Via Morego, 30 16163 Genova, (Italy)===

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Abstract

We report a new sodium-ion battery formed by coupling a NaFePO4 cathode and a nanocomposite tin–carbon (Sn–C) sodium-alloying anode. The NaFePO4 cathode is obtained by Li–Na conversion of a LiFePO4 cathode directly in the full cell employing the Sn–C anode and a sodium-ion electrolyte. The results show that the unique approach adopted here is capable of successfully and efficiently converting LiFePO4 into NaFePO4 in a sodium-ion battery operating at a voltage of 3 V, with a maximum reversible capacity of 150 mAh g−1, high reversibility, and high rate capability.

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