Speed Dependence of Thermochemical Nanolithography for Gray-Scale Patterning

Authors

  • Dr. Keith M. Carroll,

    1. School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St., Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (USA)
    2. Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 Ferst Dr., Atlanta GA, 30332-0363 (USA)
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  • Maitri Desai,

    1. Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 Ferst Dr., Atlanta GA, 30332-0363 (USA)
    2. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta GA, 30332-0400 (USA)
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  • Dr. Anthony J. Giordano,

    1. School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Georgia Institute of Technology, 901 Atlantic Dr., Atlanta GA, 30332-0400 (USA)
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  • Prof. Jan Scrimgeour,

    1. School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St., Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (USA)
    2. School of Physics, Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY 13699-5820 (USA)
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  • Prof. William P. King,

    1. Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801-2906 (USA)
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  • Prof. Elisa Riedo,

    1. School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St., Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (USA)
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  • Prof. Jennifer E. Curtis

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St., Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (USA)
    2. Parker H. Petit Institute for Bioengineering and Biosciences, Georgia Institute of Technology, 315 Ferst Dr., Atlanta GA, 30332-0363 (USA)
    • School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, 837 State St., Atlanta, GA 30332-0430 (USA)

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Abstract

Thermochemical nanolithography (TCNL) is a high-resolution lithographic technique and, owing to its fast speed, versatility, and unique ability to fabricate arbitrary, gray-scale nanopatterns, this scanning probe technique is relevant both for fundamental scientific research as well as for nanomanufacturing applications. In this work, we study the dependence of the TCNL driven chemical reactions on the translation speed of the thermal cantilever. The experimental data compares well with a model of the chemical kinetics for a first-order reaction. The impact of higher order reactions on the optimization of TCNL is addressed. The reported quantitative description of the speed dependence of TCNL is exploited and illustrated by fabricating controlled gradients of chemical concentration.

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