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ROFRET: A Molecular-Scale Fluorescent Probe Displaying Viscosity-Enhanced Intramolecular Förster Energy Transfer

Authors

  • Dr. Dan Bai,

    1. Molecular Photonics Laboratory, School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (UK)
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  • Prof. Andrew C. Benniston,

    Corresponding author
    1. Molecular Photonics Laboratory, School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (UK)
    • Andrew C. Benniston, Molecular Photonics Laboratory, School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (UK)

      Nikolai V. Tkachenko, Department of Chemistry & Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, 33101, Tampere (Finland)

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  • Dr. Victoria L. Whittle,

    1. Molecular Photonics Laboratory, School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (UK)
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  • Prof. Helge Lemmetyinen,

    1. Department of Chemistry & Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, 33101, Tampere (Finland)
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  • Prof. Nikolai V. Tkachenko

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry & Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, 33101, Tampere (Finland)
    • Andrew C. Benniston, Molecular Photonics Laboratory, School of Chemistry, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (UK)

      Nikolai V. Tkachenko, Department of Chemistry & Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, PO Box 541, 33101, Tampere (Finland)

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Abstract

The fluorescent probe ROFRET contains a Bodipy molecular rotor connected through a short triazole-based spacer to a fully alkylated Bodipy. Förster resonance energy transfer takes place from the rotor to the other Bodipy, and is enhanced to a limiting value as the viscosity of the solvent increases. Time-resolved spectroscopy and steady-state studies are consistent with both forward and reverse energy transfer, and delayed fluorescence.

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