ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 16

Special Issue: Erich Sackmann Special Birthday Issue

November 9, 2009

Volume 10, Issue 16

Pages 2737–2903

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Coupled Modulated Bilayers: A Phenomenological Model (ChemPhysChem 16/2009) (page 2737)

      Yuichi Hirose, Shigeyuki Komura and David Andelman

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows two-dimensional concentration patterns which result from a model of coupled modulated lipid bilayers. The top figures illustrate two coupled modulated monolayers forming a bilayer membrane. Each monolayer is composed of a binary A/B lipid mixture, which can have a spatial modulation (either striped or hexagonal). The relative composition of the two lipids in the upper and the lower leaflets are defined by ϕ and ψ, respectively. The coupling arises from the interactions between the lipid tails across the bilayer midplane. The obtained equilibrium patterns of ϕ, ψ, ϕ+ψ, and ϕψ are presented for several cases. The first column is a combination between normal and inverted hexagonal phases. The second and the third columns are combinations of two striped phases which have different inherent wavelengths between ϕ and ψ. The wavelengths of ψ in the third column is smaller than that in the second column. In general various complex patterns arise from the frustration between the two incommensurate but annealed structures, as shown by D. Andelman et al. on p. 2839.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Structural and Viscoelastic Properties of Actin Networks Formed by Espin or Pathologically Relevant Espin Mutants (ChemPhysChem 16/2009) (page 2738)

      Oliver Lieleg, Kurt M. Schmoller, Kirstin R. Purdy Drew, Mireille M. A. E. Claessens, Christine Semmrich, Lili Zheng, James R. Bartles and Andreas R. Bausch

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990067

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      On p. 2813, A. R. Bausch et al. investigate the structural and viscoelastic properties of reconstituted actin networks in the presence of the cross-linking and bundling protein espin by using fluorescence microscopy and macrorheology. The image shows an artistic impression of reconstituted networks of actin bundles.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPhysChem 16/2009 (pages 2739–2747)

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990068

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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    1. Quantitative Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy (RICM) in Soft Matter and Cell Adhesion (pages 2752–2768)

      Laurent Limozin and Kheya Sengupta

      Article first published online: 8 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900601

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      On RICM: This review provides a guide to setting up a reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) system and interpreting the images. Examples of dynamical adhesion processes in colloid and membrane physics and cell biology are given. The picture (left) shows a giant phospholipid vesicle partially adhered to a substrate (arrows: adhesion domains) and (right) a spreading monocyte (arrow: large lamellipodium).

  6. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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    1. Vesicle Budding and the Origin of Cellular Life (pages 2769–2776)

      Saša Svetina

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900577

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      Early evolution: In this Minireview, the author reveals how earlier studies of the phenomenon of vesicle budding (see picture) led to a more recent theoretical treatment of vesicle self-reproduction and explains why this process could have preceded the establishment of cellular life.

    2. Biomimetic F-Actin Cortex Models (pages 2777–2786)

      Tamás Haraszti, Anabel E.-M. Clemen and Joachim P. Spatz

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900581

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      Stretch and bend: This Minireview summarizes the development of F-actin network models and highlights their applicability towards the step-by-step construction of complex cortex-mimicking systems. The picture shows polystyrene beads held by a holographic optical tweezers system in a hexagonal pattern, decorated with actin filaments.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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    1. Evidence for Interleaflet Slip During Spreading of Single Lipid Bilayers at Hydrophilic Solids (pages 2787–2790)

      Babak Sanii, Kathy Nguyen, Joachim O. Rädler and Atul N. Parikh

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900372

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      Membrane dynamics: Slip—the relative mobility of the two leaflets in lipid bilayers—represents a generic mechanical-dynamical process. To establish the presence of interleaflet slip in the surface-spreading lipid membranes, the advancing lipid bilayers are exposed to an intense laser spot, which rapidly bleaches the illuminated fluorophores in a radially symmetric shape (see figure).

    2. Determining the Zero-Force Binding Energetics of an Intercalated DNA Complex by a Single-Molecule Approach (pages 2791–2794)

      Tzu-Sen Yang, Yujia Cui, Chien-Ming Wu, Jem-Mau Lo, Chi-Shiun Chiang, Wun-Yi Shu, Wei-Ju Chung, Chung-Shan Yu, Kuo-Ning Chiang and Ian C. Hsu

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900435

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      Binding behavior of DNA: A wormlike chain model is applied to determine the zero-force binding energetics of an intercalated DNA complex. A mono-intercalating agent is synthesized which can be very easily inserted into the DNA bases (see figure). This approach is particularly important in nuclear medicine and new radiation therapies.

  8. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
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    1. Adsorption Mechanism of Polypeptides and Their Location at Hydrophobic Interfaces (pages 2795–2799)

      Tobias Pirzer and Thorsten Hugel

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900574

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      A single-molecule method based on atomic force microscopy is applied to determine the adhesion strength and location of polypeptides at interfaces (see figure). The experiments show that the adsorbed polypeptide spans over both the depletion layer and the hydrophobic hydration layer to facilitate a compensation mechanism between dispersive and hydration forces.

    2. Designing the Folding Mechanics of Coiled Coils (pages 2800–2804)

      Thomas Bornschlögl, J. Christof M. Gebhardt and Matthias Rief

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900575

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      Coiled-coil folding: By controlling the size of the nucleation seed the authors are able to adjust the mean refolding force of a model coiled coil in the range between 0 and 8 pN (see picture).

    3. PI(4,5)P2 Degradation Promotes the Formation of Cytoskeleton-Free Model Membrane Systems (pages 2805–2812)

      Heiko Keller, Maier Lorizate and Petra Schwille

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900598

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      Giant plasma membrane vesicles are new alternatives to synthetic model membranes. They form after Ca2+ influx, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] degradation, and detachment of the cytoskeleton. These differences to intact cells may promote phase separation (see picture).

    4. Structural and Viscoelastic Properties of Actin Networks Formed by Espin or Pathologically Relevant Espin Mutants (pages 2813–2817)

      Oliver Lieleg, Kurt M. Schmoller, Kirstin R. Purdy Drew, Mireille M. A. E. Claessens, Christine Semmrich, Lili Zheng, James R. Bartles and Andreas R. Bausch

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900604

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reconstituted actin networks: The structural and viscoelastic properties of reconstituted actin networks in the presence of the cross-linking and bundling protein espin are investigated by using fluorescence microscopy (see picture) and macrorheology. These properties are then compared to those of actin networks induced by pathologically relevant espin mutants.

    5. From Branched Networks of Actin Filaments to Bundles (pages 2818–2827)

      Yifat Brill-Karniely, Yaron Ideses, Anne Bernheim-Groswasser and Avinoam Ben-Shaul

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900615

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      Bending and binding are balanced upon bundling: When the length of actin filaments emanating from the surface of a densely branched network becomes long enough, they can bend towards each other, and with the help of cross-linking proteins like fascin, they overcome the bending energy and associate into bundles (see picture). We present a theoretical model explaining this process.

    6. Probing Biomembrane Dynamics by Dual-Wavelength Reflection Interference Contrast Microscopy (pages 2828–2838)

      Cornelia Monzel, Susanne F. Fenz, Rudolf Merkel and Kheya Sengupta

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900645

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      Analyzing membrane shape: Using a second wavelength in microinterferometry and exploiting basic assumptions on membrane shape (continuity and smoothness) enabled the stable, automated reconstruction of the shapes of fluctuating membranes (see figure). Based on this, fundamental physicochemical properties of adhered membranes can be explored.

    7. Coupled Modulated Bilayers: A Phenomenological Model (pages 2839–2846)

      Yuichi Hirose, Shigeyuki Komura and David Andelman

      Article first published online: 21 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900618

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Between the sheets: A model addressing the coupling mechanism between two spatially modulated monolayers (see picture) is presented. It is shown that complex patterns may arise from the frustration between the two incommensurate but annealed structures.

    8. Diffusion of Circular DNA in Two-Dimensional Cavity Arrays (pages 2847–2851)

      Dmytro Nykypanchuk, David A. Hoagland and Helmut H. Strey

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900655

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      DNA diffusion through a two-dimensional cavity array with connecting pores of submolecular size is visualized by fluorescence microscopy. Circular DNA diffuses slower than linear DNA of the same length, a trend indicating that linear DNA preferably moves through connecting pores by the threading of an end rather than the looping of a midsection (see figure).

    9. Phase-Transition- and Dissipation-Driven Budding in Lipid Vesicles (pages 2852–2857)

      Thomas Franke, Christian T. Leirer, Achim Wixforth, Nily Dan and Matthias F. Schneider

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900658

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      Phase-transition-driven budding: Fluid domains in a gel-like matrix grow into the third dimension (see picture). Size and time scales are determined by the balance between dissipation and elastic energy and fall well into the biological range.

    10. Phase Transition Induced Adhesion of Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (pages 2858–2861)

      Thomas Franke, Christian Leirer, Achim Wixforth and Matthias F. Schneider

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800555

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vesicle adhesion: The adhesion of DPPC vesicles, which undergo a gel to fluid phase transition are studied (see figure showing the phase contrast images during the phase transition). The major source driving the wetting transition is the supply of excess area during melting accompanied by the decrease in bending rigidity of the membrane.

    11. Macroscopic Properties of Phospholipid Vesicles with a Contact Angle between the Membrane Domains (pages 2862–2870)

      Bojan Božič and Janja Majhenc

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900209

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vesicle-shape calculations are presented for vesicles with a contact angle between the membrane domains. The picture compares micrographs of the same vesicle at different volumes with the shapes calculated for the same ratios between the volume and the membrane area (reduced volume v). The obtained values for the line tension and the contact angle are 6±3 pn and 1.43±0.3 rad, respectively.

    12. DNA Condensation by Field-Induced Non-Equilibrium Noise (pages 2871–2875)

      Robijn F. Bruinsma and Robert Riehn

      Article first published online: 16 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900525

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fatal attraction: The picture shows a proposed mechanism for AC field-induced attraction between DNA molecules by enhancement of coupled charge–curvature fluctuations. The electrical field produces polarization charges in curved sections of the molecule. If the field changes direction, then the polarization charges change sign.

    13. Modulation of Substrate–Membrane Interactions by Linear Poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) Spacers Revealed by X-ray Reflectivity and Ellipsometry (pages 2876–2883)

      Peter C. Seitz, Michael D. Reif, Oleg V. Konovalov, Rainer Jordan and Motomu Tanaka

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900553

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      Keep your distance: Membrane–substrate interactions are influenced by hydrated polymer interlayers (see picture). The influence of lateral density and osmotic pressure exerted on the membrane is investigated by using two reflectivity techniques: ellipsometry and specular X-ray reflectivity.

    14. Axonal Guidance by Surface Microstructuring for Intracellular Transport Investigations (pages 2884–2890)

      Carina Pelzl, Delphine Arcizet, Guido Piontek, Jürgen Schlegel and Doris Heinrich

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900555

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cellular outgrowth is guided by predefined chemical structures, thereby producing straight axons for precise one-dimensional intracellular transport analysis (see picture).

    15. Conformations of Entangled Semiflexible Polymers: Entropic Trapping and Transient Non-Equilibrium Distributions (pages 2891–2899)

      Hauke Hinsch and Erwin Frey

      Article first published online: 9 OCT 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900614

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The tube model is a central concept in polymer physics that allows the reduction of the complex many-filament problem of an entangled polymer solution to a single-filament description (see picture for a two-dimensional cut through the network). The probability distribution function of conformations of confinement tubes and single encaged filaments in entangled semiflexible polymer solutions is investigated.

  9. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Review
    7. Minireviews
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemPhysChem 17/2009 (page 2903)

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990070

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