ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 4

March 9, 2009

Volume 10, Issue 4

Pages 593–735

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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    1. Cover Picture: Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies Reveal Long-Range Electron-Transfer Dynamics Through Double-Stranded DNA (ChemPhysChem 4/2009) (page 593)

      Manoj Kumbhakar, Alexander Kiel, Haridas Pal and Dirk-Peter Herten

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990012

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      The cover picture shows the results of single-molecule experiments where fluctuations in the fluorescence emission of a FRET donor could be related to charge transfer through the π-stack of double-stranded DNA. The bottom drawing shows a microscopic single-molecule image of individual DNA probes depicted as green and red spots, indicative of donor and acceptor emission respectively. The overlay on the right is a sketch of a DNA probe with combined electron and energy transfer. The first second of the fluorescence transient shown on top is indicative of energy transfer until the acceptor photo-bleaches (red). On page 629, M. Kumbhakar, D.-P. Herten et al. demonstrate that the donor emission shows fluctuations (green) after acceptor bleaching that can be related to charge transfer between donors and acceptors transmitted by the π-stack of double-stranded DNA.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
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    1. Why are Cold Molecules so Hot? (pages 604–623)

      Bretislav Friedrich and John M. Doyle

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800577

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      Brrrr! Cold molecule and cold atom research are juxtaposed and the challenges in cooling and trapping molecules are recounted. Both indirect and direct techniques of producing cold and slow molecules (such as buffer-gas cooling and magnetic trapping, see picture) are described. Advanced techniques of manipulating cold or slow molecules are reviewed and ongoing work with cold molecules is outlined.

  5. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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    1. Magnifying Superlenses and other Applications of Plasmonic Metamaterials in Microscopy and Sensing (pages 625–628)

      Igor I. Smolyaninov and Christopher C. Davis

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800757

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      Every last detail: New advances in the construction of metamaterials enable the creation of artificial optical media, whose use in microscopy can provide resolution that is not determined by the conventional diffraction limit. The picture shows a superposition of an AFM image of a plasmonic metamaterial onto the corresponding optical image obtained using a conventional optical microscope.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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    1. Single-Molecule Fluorescence Studies Reveal Long-Range Electron-Transfer Dynamics Through Double-Stranded DNA (pages 629–633)

      Manoj Kumbhakar, Alexander Kiel, Haridas Pal and Dirk-Peter Herten

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800700

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Complex dynamics of combined long-range fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and short-range electron transfer (ET) processes in a single double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecule (see figure) reveals that FRET remains almost unaltered in the presence of ET. Present systems also demonstrate the potential for long-range ET studies through the base stack in single dsDNA molecules.

    2. Resonance-Enhanced Multiphoton Ionisation of Purine (pages 634–636)

      Michael Schneider, Tilman Hain and Ingo Fischer

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800728

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      State-of-the-art molecular-beam techniques reveal that the lowest lying electronic excited state in purine is the nπ* state. Using multiphoton ionization spectroscopy, the origin is found to occur at 31 309 cm−1, and a vibrational structure is visible that is assigned to the skeletal motion of the ring (see figure).

    3. Ti0.99Pd0.01O2−δ: A New Pt-free Catalyst for High Rates of H2+O2 Recombination with High CO Tolerant Capacity (pages 637–640)

      Sudhanshu Sharma and Manjanath S. Hegde

      Version of Record online: 22 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800768

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      A platinum-free H2/O2recombination catalyst, Ti0.99Pd0.01O2−δ, is synthesized by a solution combustion method where Pd2+ ions adsorb protonic H2δ+ ion and oxygen on the oxide ion vacancy sites (see picture). The rate of H2+O2 recombination at 50 °C is 15 μmoles g−1 s−1, which is much higher than that of Pt-containing catalysts.

    4. Fabrication of Monodisperse Toroidal Particles by Polymer Solidification in Microfluidics (pages 641–645)

      Baoguo Wang, Ho Cheung Shum and David A. Weitz

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800786

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      Microdoughnuts: Polymer toroidal particles such as the one shown in the left picture have been prepared by a capillary microfluidic technique. Droplets of polymer solution undergo non-uniform solidification to form the anisotropic polymer particles. By incorporating functional materials inside the polymer network, functional toroidal particles (center and right images) can be tailor-made for specific applications such as magnetic actuation.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
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    1. Highly Emissive Nanostructured Thin Films of Organic Host–Guests for Energy Conversion (pages 647–653)

      Juliette Moreau, Umberto Giovanella, Jean-Philippe Bombenger, William Porzio, Varun Vohra, Laura Spadacini, Giuseppe Di Silvestro, Luisa Barba, Gianmichele Arrighetti, Silvia Destri, Mariacecilia Pasini, Michele Saba, Fancesco Quochi, Andrea Mura, Giovanni Bongiovanni, Mauro Fiorini, Michela Uslenghi and Chiara Botta

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800682

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      All-organic nanostructured host–guest materials (see picture) show enhanced, tunable fluorescence due to a high concentration of dyes with controlled spatial and geometrical organization that allows controlled resonant energy transfer. Homogeneous films of deoxycholic acid host–guests, provide coatings that convert near-UV light into blue light with an efficiency higher than that of the standard polymeric blends.

    2. On the Mechanism of Floating and Sliding of Liquid Marbles (pages 654–656)

      Edward Bormashenko, Yelena Bormashenko, Albina Musin and Zahava Barkay

      Version of Record online: 28 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800746

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      Little hovercrafts: The mechanisms of floating and sliding of liquid marbles (see picture) are elucidated. It is demonstrated that floating and sliding liquid marbles are separated from their supporting media by an air layer, resembling Leidenfrost drops. An ESEM study of the marble surface shows a rugged surface facilitating the trapping of air.

    3. Polymorphism and Phonon Dynamics of α-Quaterthiophene (pages 657–663)

      Paolo Ranzieri, Alberto Girlando, Silvia Tavazzi, Marcello Campione, Luisa Raimondo, Ivano Bilotti, Aldo Brillante, Raffaele G. Della Valle and Elisabetta Venuti

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800771

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      Two 4T: Low-frequency micro-Raman spectroscopy coupled with lattice dynamics calculations is an invaluable tool for investigating polymorphism in organic semiconductors. The Raman spectra of the low-temperature (LT) and high-temperature (HT) polymorphs of α-quaterthiophene (4T) are presented and interpreted (see picture). Raman mapping is applied to investigate the phase purity.

    4. Thin Films of Photoactive Polymer Blends (pages 664–671)

      Matthias A. Ruderer, Ezzeldin Metwalli, Weinan Wang, Gunar Kaune, Stephan V. Roth and Peter Müller-Buschbaum

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800773

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      Photoactive polymer blends: Films consisting of two photoactive homopolymers, MEH-PPV and P3HT, are prepared via spin coating. Investigation of the lateral domain distance inside the blended film, performed by using grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering techniques, shows that the theoretically predicted blending ratio seems most promising (see figure).

    5. Probing the Ignored Elimination Channel of Br2 in the 248 nm Photodissociation of 1,1-Dibromoethylene by Cavity Ring-Down Absorption Spectroscopy (pages 672–679)

      Ping-Chen Lee, Po-Yu Tsai, Ming-Kai Hsiao, King-Chuen Lin, C. H. Huang and A. H. H. Chang

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800665

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      A process of elimination: Optical spectra of the Br2 product eliminated from the photodissociation of 1,1-dibromoethylene at 248 nm are obtained (see picture), and the subsequent dissociation pathways are proposed with the aid of ab initio potential energy calculations. The behavior of the compound is compared with that of 1,2-dibromoethylene.

    6. Preparation of Highly Luminescent CdTe/CdS Core/Shell Quantum Dots (pages 680–685)

      Jian Wang, Yitao Long, Yuliang Zhang, Xinhua Zhong and Linyong Zhu

      Version of Record online: 9 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800672

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      A good balance: Oil-soluble CdTe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) that emit in the visible and near-infrared spectral regions with quantum yields up to 92 % (see figure) are prepared by balancing the coordinating capacity and the activation effect of selected surfactants.

    7. Characterization of CF Bonds with Multiple-Bond Character: Bond Lengths, Stretching Force Constants, and Bond Dissociation Energies (pages 686–698)

      Elfi Kraka and Dieter Cremer

      Version of Record online: 16 JAN 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800699

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A reliable descriptor of the bond strength is the stretching force constant associated with the adiabatic vibrational mode that is localized in the bond and does not couple with other vibrational modes. This is used for a comparison of C[DOUBLE BOND]F+ and C[DOUBLE BOND]O bonds (see picture).

    8. Self-Assembly of Alkoxy-Substituted Bis(hydrazone)-Based Organic Ligands and of a Metallosupramolecular Grid on Graphite (pages 699–705)

      Giuseppina Pace, Artur Stefankiewicz, Jack Harrowfield, Jean-Marie Lehn and Paolo Samorì

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800733

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      On edge: Self-assembled monolayers of a bis(hydrazone)-based molecular grid physisorbed on graphite are studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (see picture). High order is attained at the supramolecular level by thermal annealing of the grid-based films. A preferential edge-on configuration of the molecular grid with respect to the substrate is found.

    9. Conflicting Observations Resolved by a Far IR and UV/Vis Study of the NO3 Radical (pages 706–710)

      Helmut Beckers, Helge Willner and Marilyn E. Jacox

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800860

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      Codeposition of NO and O2 diluted in Ne at 6 K yield a ON⋅⋅⋅OO complex that exhibit strong UV absorption. This complex is converted into NO3 radicals by UV irradiation, and is regenerated by radiation of visible light (see spectra).

    10. Differential Sensing of Serine and Tyrosine with Aligned CdS Nanowire Arrays Based on pH-Dependent Photoluminescence Behavior (pages 711–714)

      Yi-Feng Lin, Yung-Jung Hsu, Wei-Yun Cheng and Shih-Yuan Lu

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800663

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      Up and down: Differential sensing of serine and tyrosine is achieved with aligned CdS nanowire arrays by exploring the pH-dependent PL behavior of the nanowire arrays toward exposure to the two amino acid solutions (see picture).

    11. Is It Possible to Dope Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Graphene with Sulfur? (pages 715–722)

      Pablo A. Denis, Ricardo Faccio and Alvaro W. Mombru

      Version of Record online: 2 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800592

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      Sulfur doping of single-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene is possible from a thermodynamic standpoint, according to DFT calculations. In the case of graphene, the doped sheet can be a small-band-gap semiconductor, as revealed by a plot of the band structure (see picture), or it can have better metallic properties than the pristine sheet, depending on the level of S doping.

    12. Temperature Dependence of the Dielectric Properties and Dynamics of Ionic Liquids (pages 723–733)

      Johannes Hunger, Alexander Stoppa, Simon Schrödle, Glenn Hefter and Richard Buchner

      Version of Record online: 9 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800483

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      No solo dancers: The temperature dependence of dielectric spectra suggests that the lower-frequency relaxation dominating the dynamics of imidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids cannot be solely due to independent rotational diffusion of the cations (see picture), but must also include cooperative motions of the surrounding particles.

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemPhysChem 5/2009 (page 735)

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990015

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