ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 10 Issue 5

March 23, 2009

Volume 10, Issue 5

Pages 737–859

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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    1. Cover Picture: Tuneable Control of Interfacial Rheology and Emulsion Coalescence (ChemPhysChem 5/2009) (page 737)

      Andrew S. Malcolm, Annette F. Dexter, Jayant A. Katakdhond, Stoyan I. Karakashev, Anh V. Nguyen and Anton P. J. Middelberg

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990016

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture illustrates a microfluidic dodecane-in-water emulsion stabilized by the designed peptide surfactant AM1, which forms a cohesive interfacial layer through reversible interaction with ZnII. Deformed coagulated droplets are stabilized against coalescence in the presence of an elastic interfacial layer, but coalesce rapidly following ZnII chelation with EDTA. A. P. J. Middelberg et al show on page 778 that coalescence rate can be controlled by altering interfacial rheology and hence the dynamics of thin film rupture.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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  4. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
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    1. The Quest for Cold and Ultracold Molecules (pages 751–754)

      David W. Chandler and Kevin E. Strecker

      Version of Record online: 24 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800813

      Cool molecules: The cooling of molecules to sub-Kelvin temperatures promises to have a great impact in chemistry and physics. Recently, the first experimental realizations of samples of deeply bound molecules that are approaching the ultracold regime were reported. In this contribution, these interesting results are briefly discussed.

  5. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
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    1. Entangling Light in its Spatial Degrees of Freedom with Four-Wave Mixing in an Atomic Vapor (pages 755–760)

      Vincent Boyer, Alberto M. Marino, Raphael C. Pooser and Paul D. Lett

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800734

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      Nonlinearities in atomic vapors allow the production of “entangled images”—beams of light whose transverse light distributions exhibit localized correlations in their unavoidable quantum fluctuations (see picture). These spatially entangled beams may prove useful to reduce the noise in absorption imaging and beam positioning below the quantum noise level, as well as for quantum information applications.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
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    1. Mode-Selective Promotion and Isotope Effects of Concerted Double-Hydrogen Tunneling in Porphycene Embedded in Superfluid Helium Nanodroplets (pages 761–765)

      Alexander Vdovin, Jacek Waluk, Bernhard Dick and Alkwin Slenczka

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900022

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Intramolecular double-hydrogen tunneling in porphycene (see picture) is investigated. Low-temperature conditions are ensured by doping of single molecules into superfluid helium nanodroplets. The investigation of fluorescence excitation and dispersed emission spectra and the highly dissipative environment allows the observation of mode-selective tunneling splitting and reveals a purely concerted tunneling mechanism for all isotopic variants of porphycene.

    2. Plasmon-Resonance-Based Generation of Cathodic Photocurrent at Electrodeposited Gold Nanoparticles Coated with TiO2 Films (pages 766–769)

      Nobuyuki Sakai, Yusuke Fujiwara, Yukina Takahashi and Tetsu Tatsuma

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800704

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      Reversed photoresponse: Indium tin oxide (ITO)/Au nanoparticle (NP)/TiO2 electrodes (see picture) exhibit cathodic photocurrents and positive photopotentials under visible light, whereas ITO/TiO2/Au NP electrodes show an inverted response. This behavior indicates that electron transfer occurs from the plasmon-excited Au NPs to the TiO2 film. An enhanced O2 photoreduction activity is found for ITO/Au NP/TiO2/Pt electrodes.

    3. Self-Propelled Polymer Nanomotors (pages 770–773)

      Yu-Guo Tao and Raymond Kapral

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800829

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      Polymer conformations: The picture shows instantaneous conformations of product molecules produced in a catalytic reaction at the head of a polymer chain. The extended (left) and collapsed (right) polymers correspond to chains in good and poor solvent conditions, respectively. The product molecule concentration gradient leads to a directed force on the polymer, so that it functions as a self-propelled nanomotor.

    4. Preparation of Buckypaper–Copper Composites and Investigation of their Conductivity and Mechanical Properties (pages 774–777)

      Michele T. Byrne, Yenny R. Hernandez, Thomas Conaty, Fiona M. Blighe, Johnathan N. Coleman and Yurii K. Gun'ko

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800750

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      Buckypaper-metal composites are prepared by substrate-enhanced electroless deposition of copper onto strips of buckypaper (see picture). Electrical conductivity and mechanical properties of these buckypaper-copper composites at different copper content are investigated. The conductivity is shown to increases by up to 350 %, and the Young's modulus and the ultimate tensile strength of the composites by 282 % and 290 % respectively over pristine buckypaper.

    5. Tuneable Control of Interfacial Rheology and Emulsion Coalescence (pages 778–781)

      Andrew S. Malcolm, Annette F. Dexter, Jayant A. Katakdhond, Stoyan I. Karakashev, Anh V. Nguyen and Anton P. J. Middelberg

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Breaking point: Switchable peptide surfactants are used to demonstrate that the extent of cross-linking in an interfacial surfactant layer can control the rate of emulsion coalescence. Pictured is the rupture of an aqueous thin film where the peptide layer lacks sufficient strength to prevent hole formation, but nonetheless dramatically slows the rate of hole expansion.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
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    1. Combustion of CH4/H2/Air Mixtures in Catalytic Microreactors (pages 783–786)

      Stefania Specchia, Luigi D. Vella, Sara Burelli, Guido Saracco and Vito Specchia

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800697

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      The combustion of CH4 and H2 in a confined space represents an innovative way to produce heat and power. Burning tests on CH4/H2/air mixtures using Pd/NiCrO4-catalyst-lined SiC monoliths (see picture) show an important reduction of both the ignition temperature and the 100 % conversion temperature in these systems.

    2. Synthesis, Characterization, and Electro-Optical Properties of ZnII Complexes with π-Conjugated Terpyridine Ligands (pages 787–798)

      Andreas Winter, Christian Friebe, Manuela Chiper, Ulrich S. Schubert, Martin Presselt, Benjamin Dietzek, Michael Schmitt and Jürgen Popp

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800714

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Leading light: A series of zinc(II) bis-terpyridine complexes (see picture) is investigated by means of DFT calculations combined with Bader's quantum theory of atoms in molecules. Raman spectroscopy experiments and studies of the electro-optical properties of the complexes in solution and the solid state are also performed to examine their potential as new emissive materials in light-emitting devices.

    3. Preservation of the Morphology of a Self-Encapsulated Thin Titania Film in a Functional Multilayer Stack: An X-Ray Scattering Study (pages 799–805)

      Jan Perlich, Mine Memesa, Alexander Diethert, Ezzeldin Metwalli, Weinan Wang, Stephan V. Roth, Andreas Timmann, Jochen S. Gutmann and Peter Müller-Buschbaum

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800800

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Looks matter: Generally, the morphology of titania thin films is crucial for their performance, hence much effort is spent to tailor the desired morphology. X-ray scattering enables the monitoring of the crystalline titania layer morphology during build-up of the functional multilayer stack (see Figure). Herein evidence is provided that the morphology is preserved throughout the fabrication process.

    4. Positively Charged Compact Quantum Dot–DNA Complexes for Detection of Nucleic Acids (pages 806–811)

      Junghan Lee, Youngseon Choi , Junwon Kim, Eunjung Park and Rita Song

      Version of Record online: 2 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800504

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Selective DNA detection: The fluorescence, from stable cationic QDs, is quenched by 90% on complexation with modified DNA molecules. The QD–DNA probe is capable of detecting pathogenic DNA fragments at concentrations as low as 200 nM in solution and shows selective fluorescence recovery in the presence of target DNA (see spectrum c in figure) vs noncomplementary DNA (spectrum d).

    5. Positron Annihilation Lifetimes in Cucurbiturils: Evidence of Internal Inclusion of Gold in CB[7] (pages 812–816)

      Pedro Montes-Navajas, Laura C. Damonte and Hermenegildo García

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800565

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positron lifetime spectroscopy serves to determine the void volumes of cucurbituril (CB) capsules, which are not amenable to standard gas adsorption methods. In the case of the host–guest complex Au§CB[7], it also provides evidence of the inclusion of gold nanoparticles in the CB cavity (see space-filling model; Au golden, C gray, H cyan, N blue, O red).

    6. Spin Multiplicity Dependence of Nonlinear Optical Properties (pages 817–823)

      Prakash Chandra Jha, Zilvinas Rinkevicius and Hans Ågren

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800671

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      Spin-restricted time-dependent DFT for open-shell systems is used to study the spin multiplicity dependence of nonlinear optical coefficients. Calculations are performed for various spin states of the pyrrole radical (see figure). The results indicate a substantial dependence on spin multiplicity of the NLO properties, which are sensitive to the basis set compared to closed shells at the DFT level of theory.

    7. Guest–Host Hydrogen Bonding in Structure H Clathrate Hydrates (pages 824–829)

      Robin Susilo, Saman Alavi, Igor L. Moudrakovski, Peter Englezos and John A. Ripmeester

      Version of Record online: 16 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Molecular dynamics simulations of the structure H (sH) clathrate of tert-butylmethylether show the prevalence of ether–water hydrogen bonding (see picture), absent in the neo-hexane sH clathrate. This affects guest–cage dynamics and host–water dielectric relaxation dynamics. The 13C and 1H NMR relaxation times for both guests are measured, and the differences are explained in terms of guest–host interactions in the two clathrates.

    8. Photolysis of 1-C4H9I and 2-C4H9I at 266 nm: Direct Observation of the Effect of Branching on the Photodissociation Mechanism (pages 830–834)

      Yuzhu Liu, Qiusha Zheng, Yan Zhang, Rongrong Zhang, Yanmei Wang and Bing Zhang

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800742

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Velocity ion imaging (see figure) is used to analyze the photodissociation mechanism of 1-C4H9I (left image) and 2-C4H9I (right image) at 266 nm. For 2-C4H9I, a new channel for formation of I and I* atoms is observed. It is attributed to the repulsive mode along the C[BOND]I stretch, coupled with some bending motions.

    9. Relationship between the Molecular Structure of Cyanine Dyes and the Vibrational Fine Structure of their Electronic Absorption Spectra (pages 835–840)

      Heinz Mustroph, Knut Reiner, Jürgen Mistol, Steffen Ernst, Dietmar Keil and Lothar Hennig

      Version of Record online: 19 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800755

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Vibronic sub-bands in the electronic absorption spectra of symmetrical cyanine dyes (see picture) are attributed to the symmetric C[BOND]C valence vibration of the polymethine chain in the excited state. The 3J(H,H) coupling constants in the polymethine chain can be used to characterize the bond localization within the chain in the ground state and thus to explain the intensity distribution of the sub-bands.

    10. Antimony-Doped Tin Oxide Nanocrystals: Synthesis and Solubility Behavior in Organic Solvents (pages 841–846)

      Rafael O. da Silva, Tiago G. Conti, André F. de Moura, Daniel G. Stroppa, Luiz C. G. Freitas, Caue Ribeiro, Emerson R. Camargo, Elson Longo and Edson R. Leite

      Version of Record online: 13 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800764

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The right mix: SnO2:Sb nanocrystals (NCs) can be solubilized into organic solvents with a suitable solvent/surfactant combination to achieve a stable colloid (see picture). A single synthesis route and different solvent/amphiphilic molecule pairs are used to obtain soluble NC colloids, instead of requiring several syntheses to obtain soluble NCs in different solvents.

    11. A New View on the Spectrochemical and Nephelauxetic Series on the Basis of Spin-Polarized Conceptual DFT (pages 847–854)

      Jan Moens, Pablo Jaque, Frank De Proft and Paul Geerlings

      Version of Record online: 11 FEB 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200800864

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      In a row: Chemical concepts from the spin-polarized conceptual DFT field are used to explain the spectrochemical and nephelauxetic series within a group of ruthenium complexes.

  8. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Highlight
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemPhysChem 6/2009 (page 859)

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200990019

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