ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 11 Issue 9

June 21, 2010

Volume 11, Issue 9

Pages 1793–2047

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    12. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Efficient Two-Photon Excited Amplified Spontaneous Emission from Organic Single Crystals (ChemPhysChem 9/2010) (page 1793)

      Hong Xia, Jie Yang, Hong-Hua Fang, Qi-Dai Chen, Hai-Yu Wang, Xiao-Qiang Yu, Yu-Guang Ma, Min-Hua Jiang and Hong-Bo Sun

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201090040

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Compared to currently widely used excimer and dye lasers, solid-state lasers offer obvious technical advantages. Two categories of solid-state laser technologies, namely sum-frequency of second harmonic generation (SHG) in nonlinear laser crystals and two-photon pumped (TPP) upconversion lasing of organic molecules are being adopted for wavelength shortening, of which the latter is more important, because phase matching requirements are eliminated. So far, TPP lasing has been realized for many applications, all based on molecules distribution into a polymer matrix. On p. 1871, Q. Yu, H. Sun et al. report Tpp upconversion cavityless lasing from an organic single crystal. The use of high quality crystals as the laser medium, significantly increasing the gain and the lasing efficiency and surmounting the shortcomings of polymer systems such as poor conduction, which results in a low damage threshold and short lasing lifetime, may pave the way to practical use for TPP solid-state laser sources.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
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    1. Inside Cover: Fluorapatite–Gelatine Nanocomposite Superstructures: New Insights into a Biomimetic System of High Complexity (ChemPhysChem 9/2010) (page 1794)

      Jürgen Brickmann, Raffaella Paparcone, Simon Kokolakis, Dirk Zahn, Patrick Duchstein, Wilder Carrillo-Cabrera, Paul Simon and Rüdiger Kniep

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201090041

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      The beauty of complexity is reflected by the formation of hierarchical patterns on various length scales. As shown by J. Brickmann, R. Kniep et al. on p. 1851, the simulation of the fibril pattern inside a fluorapatite-gelatine nanocomposite superstructure reveals excellent agreement with TEM data and seems to be a key scenario for the development of biogenic composite shapes and architectures.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
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    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPhysChem 9/2010 (pages 1795–1804)

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201090042

  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
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    1. You have free access to this content
      Corrigendum: Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigation of Molecular Transport and Reactivity within Polymer Brushes (page 1804)

      Tarik Matrab, Fanny Hauquier, Catherine Combellas and Frédéric Kanoufi

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201090043

      This article corrects:

      Scanning Electron Microscopy Investigation of Molecular Transport and Reactivity within Polymer Brushes

      Vol. 11, Issue 3, 670–682, Article first published online: 15 JAN 2010

  5. News

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
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    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
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  6. Review

    1. Top of page
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    5. Corrigendum
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    8. Highlight
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    1. Environmental Effects in Computational Spectroscopy: Accuracy and Interpretation (pages 1812–1832)

      Alfonso Pedone, Malgorzata Biczysko and Vincenzo Barone

      Article first published online: 31 MAR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900976

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      Role models: Significant steps toward the simulation of entire spectra in condensed phases are provided together with some basic aspects of computational spectroscopy, which highlight how intra- and intermolecular degrees of freedom influence several spectroscopic parameters (see picture). Integrated approaches are applied to the computation of IR, UV/Vis, NMR, and ESR spectral parameters of organic, inorganic, and hybrid systems.

  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
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    1. Smoothing the ripples (pages 1833–1835)

      Aparna Deshpande and Brian J. LeRoy

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000026

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      The right choice: The intrinsic ripples in a two dimensional graphene sheet (see picture) can now be evened out by choosing an appropriate substrate. This remarkable achievement can be seen as a precursor to new graphene device physics and is highlighted herein.

  8. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
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    1. Conceptual Approach to the Reactivity of Dihydrogen (pages 1837–1849)

      Heinz Berke

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200901014

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      Split personality: Dihydrogen reactions are systematically divided into the steps of splitting of H2 and H-atom transfers with homolytic and heterolytic splitting at mono- and dinuclear reaction centers (see picture, E=main group element, Lewis acid; M=transition metal; B=Lewis base or base). Homopolar H transfers in Wilkinson-type hydrogenations, heteropolar H transfers in ionic hydrogenations, transfer hydrogenations, and one-electron reactions of dihydrogen are discussed.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    12. Preview
    1. Fluorapatite–Gelatine Nanocomposite Superstructures: New Insights into a Biomimetic System of High Complexity (pages 1851–1853)

      Jürgen Brickmann, Raffaella Paparcone, Simon Kokolakis, Dirk Zahn, Patrick Duchstein, Wilder Carrillo-Cabrera, Paul Simon and Rüdiger Kniep

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000232

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The beauty of complexity is reflected by the formation of hierarchical patterns on various length scales (see picture). The simulation of the fibril pattern inside a fluorapatite-gelatine nanocomposite superstructure reveals excellent agreement with TEM data and seems to be a key scenario for the development of biogenic composite shapes and architectures.

    2. Identification of Hydroperoxy Species as Reaction Intermediates in the Electrochemical Evolution of Oxygen on Gold (pages 1854–1857)

      Boon Siang Yeo, Shannon L. Klaus, Philip N. Ross, Richard A. Mathies and Alexis T. Bell

      Article first published online: 14 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000294

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      Gotcha! Using electrochemical surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface-bound hydroxyperoxy (Au[BOND]OOH) is pinpointed in situ as a reaction intermediate of oxygen evolution on gold catalyst (see picture).

    3. Regeneration of Oxidized Organic Photo-Sensitizers in Grätzel Solar Cells: Quantum-Chemical Portrait of a General Mechanism (pages 1858–1862)

      Jonas Nyhlen, Gerrit Boschloo, Anders Hagfeldt, Lars Kloo and Timofei Privalov

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000225

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      Everything is connected: DFT calculations show the connection between the highlighted charge-transfer complexes of an oxidized organic photosensitizer (D+) and I, as well as I2, and the complete redox process: a two-step one-electron transfer pathway (A), as well as an alternative pathway (B), which involves D+ and I2 directly (see scheme).

    4. Controlled Reorientation of CuPc Molecules in Ordered Structures Assembled on the TiO2(011)-(2×1) Surface (pages 1863–1866)

      Szymon Godlewski, Antoni Tekiel, Jakub S. Prauzner-Bechcicki, Janusz Budzioch and Marek Szymonski

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000165

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      Molecular reorientation: Copper (II) phthalocyanines are investigated on the rutile TiO2(011)-(2×1) surface. At first, a quasi-ordered wetting monolayer is formed, after which well-ordered islands composed of flat-lying molecules appear (picture, left). Post-deposition thermal annealing at 200 °C leads to a complete reorientation of the second layer so that the molecules adopt an upright configuration (picture, right).

    5. Quasi-One-Dimensional Assembly of Magnetic Nanoparticles Induced by a 50 Hz Alternating Magnetic Field (pages 1867–1870)

      Weixin Zhang, Jianfei Sun, Tingting Bai, Chunyu Wang, Kehu Zhuang, Yu Zhang and Ning Gu

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000056

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      We′ve got the power: Spoke-like assemblies of magnetic nanoparticles are fabricated by the exposure of a colloidal suspension to an alternating magnetic field of power frequency 50 Hz (see picture). In such a low-frequency alternating magnetic field, the assemblies retain super-paramagnetism.

  10. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    12. Preview
    1. Efficient Two-Photon Excited Amplified Spontaneous Emission from Organic Single Crystals (pages 1871–1875)

      Hong Xia, Jie Yang, Hong-Hua Fang, Qi-Dai Chen, Hai-Yu Wang, Xiao-Qiang Yu, Yu-Guang Ma, Min-Hua Jiang and Hong-Bo Sun

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000142

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      Solid-state gain media: Efficient two-photon excited amplified spontaneous emission is observed from high quality DBASDMB crystals (see figure) which possess unique photonic properties including large two photon absorption, high fluorescent quantum efficiency, and stimulated emission. This new kind of solid-state gain media exhibits great potential for frequency upconversion applications.

    2. Prediction of Raman Optical Activity Spectra of Chiral 3-Acetylcamphorato-Cobalt Complexes (pages 1876–1887)

      Sandra Luber and Markus Reiher

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000121

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      Step by step: The calculated vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of octahedral cobalt complexes (see picture) containing different combinations of acetylacetonato and 3-acetylcamphorato ligands are investigated. Each of the isomers can be identified from its ROA spectrum, demonstrating the sensitivity of ROA spectroscopy to the chiral nature of the complexes.

    3. Water Adsorption on Platinum Dioxide and Dioxygen Complex: Matrix Isolation Infrared Spectroscopic and Theoretical Study of Three PtO2–H2O Complexes (pages 1888–1894)

      Yu Gong and Mingfei Zhou

      Article first published online: 21 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000104

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      Water adsorption on PtO2: Matrix isolation infrared spectroscopic and density functional studies reveal that the presence of O2 can promote the adsorption of water on platinum dioxygen complex, and three PtO2–H2O isomers are produced, in turn, under different experimental conditions (see figure).

    4. The Diversity of Electron-Transport Behaviors of Molecular Junctions: Correlation with the Electron-Transport Pathway (pages 1895–1902)

      Hongmei Liu, Cui Yu, Nengyue Gao and Jianwei Zhao

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000092

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      The length–conductivity relations of conjugated molecules are diverse—and they are dominated by the electron-transport pathway (see picture). In the case of a single channel, the conductance decays rapidly with the length and follows an exponential law. However, when the molecular wires have multichannels, the decay of conductance does not follow the exponential relation.

    5. Characterization of the Excited States of Indigo Derivatives in their Reduced Forms (pages 1903–1908)

      Raquel Rondão, J. Sérgio Seixas de Melo and Gundula Voss

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000082

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      Not just for jeans: A comprehensive investigation on the photophysics of the leuco form of several indigo derivatives, including indigo and Tyrian Purple shows that the deactivation of the excited state involves competition between internal conversion, triplet state formation, and fluorescence (see picture).

    6. Theoretical Study of the Reactions M++CH3F (M=Ge, As, Se, Sb) (pages 1909–1917)

      Oscar Méndez and Fernando Colmenares

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000046

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      Competition among electronic channels leading to different products are analyzed for the reactions of CH3F with the atomic ions Ge+, As+, Se+ and Sb+ (see picture).

    7. Investigation on the Second Part of the Electromagnetic SERS Enhancement and Resulting Fabrication Strategies of Anisotropic Plasmonic Arrays (pages 1918–1924)

      Dana Cialla, Jörg Petschulat, Uwe Hübner, Henrik Schneidewind, Matthias Zeisberger, Roland Mattheis, Thomas Pertsch, Michael Schmitt, Robert Möller and Jürgen Popp

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200901009

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      Designer SERS arrays: The anisotropic character of regularly ordered gold surfaces is utilized to investigate the contribution of the second part of the electromagnetic mechanism to the overall surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) enhancement. The Raman scattered light experiences an emission enhancement due to the plasmon resonances of the nanoantennas (see picture). Based on these studies, design strategies for the fabrication of SERS arrays can be given.

    8. Crystalline Quality Evaluation of Carbon Nanotubes by Kinetic Analysis in Quasi-Isothermal Conditions (pages 1925–1931)

      Maurizio Lanza, Saveria Santangelo, Giacomo Messina, Signorino Galvagno and Candida Milone

      Article first published online: 12 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900996

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      Quality tubes: We demonstrate that the crystalline quality of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) is better estimated by the apparent activation energy of the oxidation reaction (EA) than by the peak-temperature position in the derivative mass loss curves (TDTG). This figure was obtained upon investigation of a large number of commercially available and laboratory-prepared MWCNTs.

    9. Far-Infrared Spectra of Yttrium-Doped Gold Clusters AunY (n=19) (pages 1932–1943)

      Ling Lin, Pieterjan Claes, Philipp Gruene, Gerard Meijer, André Fielicke, Minh Tho Nguyen and Peter Lievens

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900994

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      Gold digger: The vibrational spectra of AunY (n=4–9) clusters are recorded by photodissociation techniques and assigned with the aid of density functional calculations. Most of the isomers for which the IR spectra agree best with experiment are the calculated energetically most stable ones (see picture). All the AunY clusters considered prefer a low spin state, and the Y atom consistently adopts high coordination.

    10. Two-, One-, and Zero-Dimensional Elemental Nanostructures Based on Ge9-Clusters (pages 1944–1950)

      Antti J. Karttunen, Thomas F. Fässler, Mikko Linnolahti and Tapani A. Pakkanen

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900987

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      Two-, one- and zero-dimensional elemental nanostructures resulting from the oxidative coupling of Zintl-type [Ge9]4− clusters are studied by using quantum chemical methods. 3D structures created from the structures of lower dimensionality (see picture) are expected to shed light on the structural characteristics of the recently synthesized mesoporous Ge-materials.

    11. Two-Dimensional Self-Assembly of a Porphyrin–Polypyridyl Ruthenium(II) Hybrid on HOPG Surface through Metal–Ligand Interactions (pages 1951–1955)

      Aimei Gao, Xinrui Miao, Jie Liu, Ping Zhao, Jinwang Huang and Wenli Deng

      Article first published online: 16 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900968

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      Self-assembly: The π–π interaction and metal–ligand interaction allow (C8ip)TPPC molecules to form self-assembled structures and have an edge-on orientation on the HOPG surface. The multidentate structure acts as linkers between the molecules and form metal–ligand coordination, which forces the assembly process in the direction of stable columnar arrays (see figure).

    12. Nanowires Formed by the Co-Assembly of a Negatively Charged Low-Molecular Weight Gelator and a Zwitterionic Polythiophene (pages 1956–1960)

      Feng Li, Ganesan Palaniswamy, Menno R. de Jong, Andreas Åslund, Peter Konradsson, Antonius T. M. Marcelis, Ernst J. R. Sudhölter, Martien A. Cohen Stuart and Frans A. M. Leermakers

      Article first published online: 7 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900946

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      Micrometer sized linear aggregates form by combining molecular solutions of a polythiophene (PTT) and a low-molecular weight gelator (see figure). The fibers can easily be observed as the PTTs are fluorescent. Potential applications may arise also from the conducting properties of the PTT.

    13. Interplay of Magnetic Exchange Interactions and Ni[BOND]S[BOND]Ni Bond Angles in Polynuclear Nickel(II) Complexes (pages 1961–1970)

      Yulia Krupskaya, Alexey Alfonsov, Anupama Parameswaran, Vladislav Kataev, Rüdiger Klingeler, Gunther Steinfeld, Norman Beyer, Mathias Gressenbuch, Berthold Kersting and Bernd Büchner

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900935

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      The cationic complexes [NiII2L1(μ-OAc)⋅I2][I5] and [NiII3L(OAc)2](BPh4)2 with obtuse Ni[BOND]S[BOND]Ni bond angles are synthesized. The magnetic exchange and the anisotropy sensitively depend on the Ni[BOND]S[BOND]Ni bond angle, yielding in particular in the Ni2-complex a high spin magnetic ground state and a negative “easy” axis anisotropy.

    14. Gold Nanoelectrode Arrays and their Evaluation by Impedance Spectroscopy and Cyclic Voltammetry (pages 1971–1977)

      David Lantiat, Vincent Vivier, Christel Laberty-Robert, David Grosso and Clément Sanchez

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900929

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      Highly regular Au nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) consisting of a nanoperforated ultrathin membrane of ZrO2 with a well-ordered array of pores on a polycrystalline gold surface are fabricated. Modeling of the impedance diagrams (see picture) allows 3D reconstruction of the surface of the NEA, which provides an accurate representation of the surface as well as the diffusion and coupling phenomena between different nanoelectrodes.

    15. Kinetics of Substituted Silylene Addition and Elimination in Silicon Nanocluster Growth Captured by Group Additivity (pages 1978–1994)

      Andrew J. Adamczyk, Marie-Françoise Reyniers, Guy B. Marin and Linda J. Broadbelt

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900836

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      Growing pains: Accurate rate coefficients for 40 bimolecular substituted silylene addition reactions of silicon hydrides (see figure) containing up to nine silicon atoms are calculated using G3//B3LYP, statistical thermodynamics, and transition-state theory. A group additivity scheme is used to predict rate coefficients, where the number and type of substituents on the reactive center for a substituted silylene addition and elimination are sufficient to allow accurate kinetic parameter estimation.

    16. Silver Coated Platinum Core–Shell Nanostructures on Etched Si Nanowires: Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) Processing and Application in SERS (pages 1995–2000)

      Vladimir A. Sivakov, Katja Höflich, Michael Becker, Andreas Berger, Thomas Stelzner, Kai-Erik Elers, Viljami Pore, Mikko Ritala and Silke H. Christiansen

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000115

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      Plasmonically active noble metal nanostructures on large surface area silicon nanowires (SiNWs) mediated by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is successfully demonstrated for applications of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based sensing (see figure).

    17. Correlation between Dynamic Heterogeneity and Local Structure in a Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid: A Molecular Dynamics Study of [bmim][PF6] (pages 2001–2010)

      Soumya S. Sarangi, Wei Zhao, Florian Müller-Plathe and Sundaram Balasubramanian

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000111

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      A dynamic approach: Molecular simulation quantitatively agrees with experiments on the complex dynamics of a room-temperature ionic liquid and provides a microscopic understanding. Results on diffusion, electrical conductivity, and the relaxation of the incoherent intermediate scattering function (see picture) are presented.

    18. The Formation of DNA Photodamage: The Role of Exciton Localization (pages 2011–2015)

      Shaila Rössle, Jana Friedrichs and Irmgard Frank

      Article first published online: 6 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000081

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      The amazing photostability of DNA: The location of the exciton contributes strongly to the low quantum yield of the formation of the cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD damage). Density functional calculations of DNA oligomers (see picture) demonstrate how exciton localization on a pair of pyrimidine bases is connected to their relative orientation at the time of excitation.

    19. Unraveling the Pressure Effect on Nucleation Processes of Amyloidogenic Proteins (pages 2016–2020)

      Stefan Gruzielanek, Yong Zhai and Roland Winter

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.202000074

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      Under pressure: The effect of pressure on the nucleation rate of insulin under fibril-forming conditions was studied and analysed using nucleation theory. Due to the negative activation volume, pressure has a drastic accelerating effect on the nucleation and growth process (see picture).

    20. Almost Ideal 1D Water Diffusion in Imogolite Nanotubes Evidenced by NMR Relaxometry (pages 2021–2026)

      Elie Belorizky, Pascal H. Fries, Armel Guillermo and Olivier Poncelet

      Article first published online: 1 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200901030

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      Down the tube: The large variation of the relaxation rate R1=1/T1 of water protons with frequency is characteristic of one-dimensional water diffusion (see picture).

    21. Donor/Acceptor Adsorbates on the Surface of Metal Oxide Nanoporous Films: A Spectroscopic Probe for Different Electron Transfer Pathways (pages 2027–2035)

      Victor V. Matylitsky, Lars Dworak and Josef Wachtveitl

      Article first published online: 18 MAY 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900991

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      Donor/acceptor adsorbates coupled to the surface of metal oxide nanoporous films can be used as spectroscopic probes for different electron transfer pathways after excitation of the donor molecule (see picture). Competition between interfacial and intermolecular electron transfer is studied via transient absorbance spectroscopy in the UV/Vis and mid-IR spectral regions.

    22. Properties of Ionic Liquid Confined in Porous Silica Matrix (pages 2036–2043)

      Manish Pratap Singh, Rajendra Kumar Singh and Suresh Chandra

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200900983

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      Confinement of the ionic liquid [BMIM][PF6] in porous silica matrix results in the decrease in melting point, red shift in fluorescence spectra and change in vibrational properties due to interaction of heterocyclic ring of [BMIM] cation with SiO2 matrix pore walls (see picture).

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    12. Preview
    1. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemPhysChem 10/2010 (page 2047)

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201090045

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