ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 18

December 23, 2011

Volume 12, Issue 18

Pages 3485–3647

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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    1. Cover Picture: Chemical Vapor Deposition Kinetics and Localized Growth Regimes in Combinatorial Experiments (ChemPhysChem 18/2011) (page 3485)

      Dr. Ali Dabirian , Dr. Yury Kuzminykh, Dr. Estelle Wagner, Dr. Giacomo Benvenuti, Simon A. Rushworth and Prof. Patrik Hoffmann

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190090

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      On p. 3524 A. Dabirian, P. Hoffmann et al. report on the discovery of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions where both the precursor adsorption and the chemical reaction limit the process. Operating CVD under these conditions has the potential to boost the resolution of laser-assisted CVD processes whereas flux- and desorption-limited conditions appear to be the ideal environment for spatially addressable combinatorial experiments.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
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    1. Inside Cover: Surface-Functionalized Ionic Liquid Crystal–Supported Ionic Liquid Phase Materials: Ionic Liquid Crystals in Mesopores (ChemPhysChem 18/2011) (page 3486)

      Florian T. U. Kohler, Bruno Morain, Alexander Weiß, Dr. Mathias Laurin, Prof. Dr. Jörg Libuda, Valentin Wagner, Berthold U. Melcher, Xinjiao Wang, Prof. Dr. Karsten Meyer and Prof. Dr. Peter Wasserscheid

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190091

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      The picture shows the temperature-switchable molecular structure of an ionic liquid crystal, confined as a thin film in a porous material. This work is presented on p. 3539 by P. Wasserscheid, J. Libuda, K. Meyer et al.

  3. Graphical Abstract

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    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
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  4. News

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    5. News
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    1. Good News for Christmas (page 3501)

      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100961

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  5. Minireview

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    5. News
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    1. In Situ Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray Microspectroscopy of Polymer Microcontainers (pages 3503–3509)

      Birgit Graf-Zeiler, Prof. Dr. Rainer H. Fink and Prof. Dr. George Tzvetkov

      Version of Record online: 18 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100370

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      Shine a light: Synchrotron-based scanning transmission X-ray microspectroscopy (STXM) is reviewed as a tool for in situ examination of polymer microcontainers. The advantages of the STXM technique are highlighted and illustrated with examples of its application to microcapsule and microbubble systems. The picture shows STXM images of air-filled polymer microbubbles in water.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
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    1. What Are the Preferred Horizontal Displacements in Parallel Aromatic–Aromatic Interactions? Significant Interactions at Large Displacements (pages 3511–3514)

      Dragan B. Ninković, Goran V. Janjić, Dušan Ž. Veljković, Dušan N. Sredojević and Prof. Snežana D. Zarić

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100777

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      Important interactions: The interactions between two benzene molecules in the parallel orientation are studied by means of crystallographic and computational methods. The results may have interesting applications in the study of systems containing aromatic molecules, including biomolecules and pharmaceuticals. The figure shows the minimum of a benzene dimer at a large offset (optimized geometry with an interaction energy of 2.01 kcal mol−1).

    2. Domain-Specific Folding Kinetics of Staphylococcal Nuclease Observed through Single-Molecule FRET in a Microfluidic Mixer (pages 3515–3518)

      Dr. Zeyong Zhi, Dr. Pengcheng Liu, Peng Wang, Prof. Dr. Yanyi Huang and Prof. Dr. Xin Sheng Zhao

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100652

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      Fast Folding: A combined single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and microfluidic mixing study reveals that the α-helical subdomain of staphylococcal nuclease (SNase) (see picture) folds about ten times faster than the β-sheet subdomain.

    3. Vibrational Circular Dichroism: A Valuable Tool for Conformational Analysis and Absolute Configuration Assignment of Chiral 1-Aryl-2,2,2-Trifluoroethanols (pages 3519–3523)

      Prof. Sergio Abbate, Dr. France Lebon, Dr. Susan Lepri, Prof. Giovanna Longhi, Dr. Roberto Gangemi, Dr. Sara Spizzichino, Prof. Gianfranco Bellachioma and Prof. Renzo Ruzziconi

      Version of Record online: 26 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100551

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      Vibrational circular dichroism spectra allow one to assign the absolute configuration and to monitor the conformational equilibria related to CF3⋅⋅⋅OH hydrogen bonding of [2.2]paracyclophane with an external stereogenic carbon atom bearing CF3, OH and H (see picture).

    4. Chemical Vapor Deposition Kinetics and Localized Growth Regimes in Combinatorial Experiments (pages 3524–3528)

      Dr. Ali Dabirian , Dr. Yury Kuzminykh, Dr. Estelle Wagner, Dr. Giacomo Benvenuti, Simon A. Rushworth and Prof. Patrik Hoffmann

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100637

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      Laser-assisted deposition: The discovery of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) conditions under which the growth rate is a decreasing function of the precursor flux has the potential to boost the resolution of laser-assisted CVD processes whereas flux- and desorption-limited conditions appear to be the ideal environment for spatially addressable combinatorial experiments (see picture).

    5. Sensitivity-Enhanced Natural-Abundance Silicon-29 Magnetic Resonance Imaging (pages 3529–3532)

      Dr. Alan Wong and Dr. Dimitris Sakellariou

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100432

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      Better images: A highly sensitive approach for imaging insensitive nuclei, such as silicon-29, using magnetic resonance is presented (see picture, right). Two-dimensional images of natural-abundance silicon-containing solid materials can now be obtained in a reasonable time.

    6. Colloidal Crystallization of Surfactant-Free ZnO Quantum Dots (pages 3533–3538)

      Xi Zhang, Dr. Dazhi Sun, Prof. Hung-Jue Sue and Riichi Nishimura

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100579

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      Surfactant-free ZnO quantum dots self-assemble into three-dimensional colloidal crystals in an organic solvent via ionic-strength tuning. The crystalline structure is macroscopically large, transparent, stable and shields UV as bulk ZnO upon solvent removal.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Preview
    1. Surface-Functionalized Ionic Liquid Crystal–Supported Ionic Liquid Phase Materials: Ionic Liquid Crystals in Mesopores (pages 3539–3546)

      Florian T. U. Kohler, Bruno Morain, Alexander Weiß, Dr. Mathias Laurin, Prof. Dr. Jörg Libuda, Valentin Wagner, Berthold U. Melcher, Xinjiao Wang, Prof. Dr. Karsten Meyer and Prof. Dr. Peter Wasserscheid

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100379

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      The influence of confinement on the ionic liquid crystal (ILC) [C18C1Im][OTf] (Im=imidazolium, OTf=trifluoromethanesulfonate) is studied. The ILC is supported on Si-based powders and glasses with pore sizes ranging from 11 to 50 nm. The ILC–supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) materials (see picture) are characterized in terms of their phase-transition temperatures. A contact layer with a thickness of about 2 nm is identified.

    2. Triazole, Benzotriazole, and Naphthotriazole as Copper Corrosion Inhibitors: I. Molecular Electronic and Adsorption Properties (pages 3547–3555)

      Dr. Anton Kokalj, Nataša Kovačević, Sebastijan Peljhan, Dr. Matjaž Finšgar, Dr. Antonija Lesar and Prof. Dr. Ingrid Milošev

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100537

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      The bigger, the stronger: Some azole molecules have the ability to significantly slow down the corrosion of metals. A systematic DFT study is reported with the aim to ascertain how the adsorption characteristics of triazoles evolve as a function of molecular size. According to calculations the molecule–surface bond strength (see picture) increases with increasing molecular size and a sound explanation of why this is so is provided.

    3. Computational Study of Bond Dissociation Enthalpies for Substituted β-O-4 Lignin Model Compounds (pages 3556–3565)

      Dr. Jarod M. Younker, Dr. Ariana Beste and Dr. A. C. Buchanan III

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100477

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      Persuasive influence: DFT is used to calculate the Boltzmann-weighted carbon–oxygen and carbon–carbon bond dissociation enthalpies (BDEs) of substituted phenethyl phenyl ethers (PPEs; see picture). Hydrogen bonding between the aliphatic substituents and the ether oxygen in the PPE derivatives has a significant influence on the BDE.

    4. Nanoscale Inhomogeneities in Thermoresponsive Triblock Copolymers (pages 3566–3572)

      Dennis Kurzbach, Miriam N. Reh and Dr. Dariush Hinderberger

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100474

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      Spin probing thermoresponsive Pluronic triblock copolymers reveals the early onset of static and dynamic inhomogeneities (see picture).

    5. Inducing Growth of FeNi–Pt Match-Like Magnetic Nanoheterostructures on Pt Nanotips and Dechlorination of Hydrochloric Ether (pages 3573–3577)

      Prof. Ming Wen, Fan Zhang, Mingzhu Cheng, Prof. Qingsheng Wu, Baolei Sun and Yuzhen Sun

      Version of Record online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100429

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      A newly designed magnetic FeNi–Pt nanorod was developed (see picture) by means of growing heterostructured FeNi nanosticks on Pt nanotips. Their reductive reactivity toward chlorinated solvents renders them interesting for application in environmental remediation.

    6. Interplay between Defect Structure and Catalytic Activity in the Mo10−xVxOy Mixed-Oxide System (pages 3578–3583)

      Dr. Peter Jakes, Nina Blickhan, Tim Jekewitz, Dr. Alfons Drochner, Prof. Dr. Herbert Vogel, Prof. Dr. Hartmut Fuess and Dr. Rüdiger-A. Eichel

      Version of Record online: 6 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100393

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      Rationalize to catalyze: The Mo10−xVxOy solid-solution system (0≤x≤10) is studied by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Concerning the catalytic activity of this system, the key role of the Mo/V ratio is revealed (see picture). Additionally a quantitative analysis of the [VO2+] concentration as a function of the Mo/V ratio allows one to characterize the prevailing defect chemistry.

    7. The Role of π Electrons in the Formation of Benzene-Containing Lithium-Bonded Complexes (pages 3584–3590)

      Prof. Yanli Zeng, Min Zhu, Prof. Lingpeng Meng and Prof. Shijun Zheng

      Version of Record online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100566

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      As easy as pi: The intermolecular interactions in C6H6⋅⋅⋅LiX (X=OH, NH2, F, Cl, Br, NC, CN) complexes were investigated by using second-order Møller–Plesset perturbation theory calculations and quantum theory of “atoms in molecules” studies. The results show that π electrons play a crucial role in the formation of these benzene-containing lithium-bonded complexes (see picture).

    8. Self-Assembly of Linear and Cyclic Siloxane-Containing Mesogens: Investigation of Layered Structures in Bulk and Thin Films (pages 3591–3603)

      Paul Heinz , Konrad Hindelang, Anastasia Golosova, Prof. Christine M. Papadakis and Prof. Bernhard Rieger

      Version of Record online: 3 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100301

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      Siloxane-based mesogens in which linear and cyclic oligosiloxanes respectively link two and four mesogenic moieties bearing long alkoxy substituents (top left picture) form self-assembled layered structures, such as that depicted top right, which are investigated by techniques such as grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering and atomic force microscopy (bottom left and right, respectively).

    9. Carbon Nanoparticles as Chromophores for Photon Harvesting and Photoconversion (pages 3604–3608)

      Juan Xu, Sushant Sahu, Li Cao, Parambath Anilkumar, Kenneth N. Tackett II, Haijun Qian, Christopher E. Bunker, Elena A. Guliants, Alexander Parenzan and Prof. Dr. Ya-Ping Sun

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100640

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      Undercover: Carbon nanoparticles have recently emerged as a unique class of optical nanomaterials. This study demonstrates the chromophoric functions of suspended small carbon nanoparticles in harvesting visible photons for the reductive coating of the nanoparticles with silver and gold (see picture) and, as a result, the preparation of unique carbon-metal core–shell nanostructures.

    10. Vaporization Enthalpies of Imidazolium Based Ionic Liquids: Dependence on Alkyl Chain Length (pages 3609–3613)

      Dr. Dzmitry H. Zaitsau, Prof. Dr. Sergey P. Verevkin, Dr. Vladimir N. Emel'yanenko and Prof. Dr. Andreas Heintz

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100618

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      A quartz crystal microbalance method is used for determination of vaporization enthalpies of a series of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide ionic liquids [Cnmim][NTf2]. In contrast to other data for [Cnmim][NTf2] reported in the literature, this technique reveals a remarkably linear dependence of the vaporization enthalpies on the chain length n at 298 K (see picture; • this work, other symbols: literature data).

    11. Basic Principles for Rational Design of High-Performance Nanostructured Silicon-Based Thermoelectric Materials (pages 3614–3618)

      Dr. Chun Cheng Yang and Prof. Sean Li

      Version of Record online: 20 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100514

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      A unified nanothermodynamic model is developed to investigate the predominant factors that determine the lattice thermal conductivity of nanocrystalline, nanoporous, and nanostructured bulk silicon. Comparisons of size-dependent lattice thermal conductivity in these materials are shown in the picture. Through a systematical study, three basic principles are proposed to enhance the thermoelectric performance in nanostructured silicon-based materials.

    12. Optical Modulation of Amplified Emission in a Polyfluorene–Diarylethene Blend (pages 3619–3623)

      Dr. Stefano Perissinotto, Dr. Michele Garbugli, Dr. Daniele Fazzi, Dr. Chiara Bertarelli, Marco Carvelli, Ajay R. Srimath Kandada, Zhounan Yue, Prof. Kam S. Wong and Prof. Guglielmo Lanzani

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100480

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      Amplified emission enhances the sensitivity (50 times more than fluorescence) of optical modulation of emission in a polyfluorene–diarylethene blend. Modulation is obtained through energy transfer from the fluorophore to the photochromic moiety. Experimental measurements and DFT calculations give further information on the underlying physics.

    13. Broadband Dielectric Spectroscopic, Calorimetric, and FTIR-ATR Investigations of D-Arabinose Aqueous Solutions (pages 3624–3633)

      Dr. Lokendra P. Singh, Dr. Silvina Cerveny, Prof. Angel Alegría and Prof. Juan Colmenero

      Version of Record online: 16 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100469

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      Ways to relax: The dielectric relaxation behavior of D-arabinose–water solutions at different water concentrations and 120–300 K is examined (see picture). Broadband dielectric spectroscopy and FTIR–attenuated total reflectance data validate the hypothesis that above a water content of about xw=0.20, self-association of water molecules occurs in the aqueous solutions.

    14. Transition from Anodic Titania Nanotubes to Nanowires: Arising from Nanotube Growth to Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 3634–3641)

      Lidong Sun, Prof. Dr. Sam Zhang, Xiu Wang, Prof. Dr. Xiao Wei Sun, Duen Yang Ong, Xiaoyan Wang and Prof. Dr. Dongliang Zhao

      Version of Record online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100450

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      No wires required: The nanotube–nanowire transition takes place during both nanotube growth and application. It is observed only in an intermediate chemical dissolution environment. The mechanism is interpreted with a model in terms of stretching and splitting (see picture). The nanowires can be suppressed by surface treatment and those grown for long durations can be removed by ultrasonic cleaning.

    15. Conformational Changes of Protein Adsorbed on Tailored Flat Substrates with Different Chemistries (pages 3642–3646)

      Prof. Dr. He Huang, Jing Xie , Xiaoli Liu , Prof. Dr. Lin Yuan , Shasha Wang, Songxi Guo , Haoran Yu, Prof. Dr. Hong Chen, Dr. Yanliang Zhang and Dr. Xiaohu Wu

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100398

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      Nanoparticle-mediated SERS: The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) technique was used to characterize the conformational changes of lysozyme adsorbed on octadecanethiol and thiolated PEG monolayers on smooth gold chips (Au-C18 and Au-PEG). The surface roughness required for recording SERS spectra (see picture) was obtained by adding Ag nanoparticles, in the absence of which no Raman signal was detectable.

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    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
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      Version of Record online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190094

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