ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 12 Issue 5

April 4, 2011

Volume 12, Issue 5

Pages 881–1023

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Cover Picture: Ion-Induced Fragmentation of Amino Acids: Effect of the Environment (ChemPhysChem 5/2011) (page 881)

      Sylvain Maclot, Michael Capron, Rémi Maisonny, Arkadiusz Ławicki, Dr. Alain Méry, Dr. Jimmy Rangama, Prof. Dr. Jean-Yves Chesnel, Sadia Bari, Prof. Dr. Ronnie Hoekstra, Dr. Thomas Schlathölter, Prof. Dr. Bruno Manil, Prof. Dr. Lamri Adoui, Dr. Patrick Rousseau and Prof. Dr. Bernd A. Huber

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190024

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      With highly charged ions at low energy, molecules can be ionised on the femtosecond timescale at large distances without appreciable energy transfer. Their interaction with small amino acids leads to fragmentation by cleavage of the weakest bond similarly to other types of radiation-induced fragmentation. A protective effect of the environment is observed when the molecules are embedded in a cluster of amino acids. The molecular cluster acts as a “buffer”, dissipating the excess energy, as described by P. Rousseau et al. on p. 930. The picture shows an artistic view of the collision between a projectile and a glycine hexamer.

  2. Inside Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Inside Cover: Interaction of Inorganic Nanoparticles with Graphene (ChemPhysChem 5/2011) (page 882)

      Barun Das, Biswajit Choudhury, A. Gomathi, Arun K. Manna, Prof. S. K. Pati and Prof. C. N. R. Rao

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190025

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      A variety of electronic and magnetic states can be obtained for graphene decorated with inorganic nanoparticles, as shown on p. 937 by S. K. Pati, C. N. R. Rao et al.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPhysChem 5/2011 (pages 883–889)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190026

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemPhysChem 5/2011 (pages 894–896)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190027

  5. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Surface Chemistry and Interfacial Charge-Transfer Mechanisms in Photoinduced Oxygen Exchange at O2–TiO2 Interfaces (pages 901–907)

      Juan Felipe Montoya, Dr. José Peral and Dr. Pedro Salvador

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000611

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      Important interactions: Experimental results on photoinduced oxygen isotopic exchange (POIE) at TiO2 surfaces (see picture) are analyzed in light of available information about the interactions of water and O2 species with TiO2. The analysis emphasizes the importance of bridging oxygen ions and bridging oxygen vacancies in the process. The observed competition between POIE and photo-oxidation (PO) of organic compounds is also discussed.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Molecular Recognition Force Spectroscopy Study of the Specific Lectin and Carbohydrate Interaction in a Living Cell (pages 909–912)

      Yongjun Li, Jine Wang, Chunyan Xing, Prof. Zhenxin Wang, Prof. Hongda Wang, Prof. Bailin Zhang and Prof. Jilin Tang

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201001008

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      Molecular recognition force spectroscopy is used to study the specific interaction between RCA120 and Gal on living HeLa cells at the single-molecule level (see picture). The results indicate that this technique can be used to explore the force and dynamics of lectin–carbohydrate interaction in living cells in their native environments.

    2. The Extreme Low-Frequency Raman Spectrum of Liquid Water (pages 913–914)

      Dr. Michelle Galvin and Dr. Dominic Zerulla

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000894

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      Not merely sloshing around: The chemical and physical properties of water are very important. In contrast to its simplistic chemical formula, water possesses a complex dynamic behaviour (see picture). The bend, torsion, symmetric and asymmetric stretch modes of liquid water, close to the wavelength of the laser line have been predicted. Here, the low-frequency Raman spectrum of liquid water is presented confirming the presence of all four modes in the restricted translational region (35–300 cm−1).

    3. A Proton-Detected 4D Solid-State NMR Experiment for Protein Structure Determination (pages 915–918)

      Matthias Huber, Dr. Sebastian Hiller, Dr. Paul Schanda, Dr. Matthias Ernst, Dr. Anja Böckmann, Dr. René Verel and Prof. Dr. Beat H. Meier

      Article first published online: 15 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100062

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      Adding a new dimension: 4D or 3D proton-detected spectra of perdeuterated protein samples with 1H labelled amides and methyl groups permit collecting unambiguous distance restraints with high sensitivity and determining protein structure by solid-state NMR (see picture).

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Effect of Surface Modification on Semiconductor Nanocrystal Fluorescence Lifetime (pages 919–929)

      Dr. Maria J. Ruedas-Rama, Dr. Angel Orte, Prof. Elizabeth A. H. Hall, Prof. Jose M. Alvarez-Pez and Dr. Eva M. Talavera

      Article first published online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000935

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      Surface of a lifetime: The development of quantum dot based photoluminescent nanosensors requires modifying the nanocrystal surface to make them biocompatible or water soluble. The effects of surface modifications and interactions with other molecules on the photoluminescence lifetimes have been studied (see picture).

    2. Ion-Induced Fragmentation of Amino Acids: Effect of the Environment (pages 930–936)

      Sylvain Maclot, Michael Capron, Rémi Maisonny, Arkadiusz Ławicki, Dr. Alain Méry, Dr. Jimmy Rangama, Prof. Dr. Jean-Yves Chesnel, Sadia Bari, Prof. Dr. Ronnie Hoekstra, Dr. Thomas Schlathölter, Prof. Dr. Bruno Manil, Prof. Dr. Lamri Adoui, Dr. Patrick Rousseau and Prof. Dr. Bernd A. Huber

      Article first published online: 2 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000823

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The weakest link: Radiation induces the fragmentation of amino acids and is mainly driven by the cleavage of the C[BOND]Cα bond; the weakest bond of the system. By embedding the amino acid in clusters, the fragmentation pattern changes drastically. The weak hydrogen-bonded network (see picture) preferentially breaks, leading to a protective effect of the environment acting as “buffer”.

    3. Interaction of Inorganic Nanoparticles with Graphene (pages 937–943)

      Barun Das, Biswajit Choudhury, A. Gomathi, Arun K. Manna, Prof. S. K. Pati and Prof. C. N. R. Rao

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201001090

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small change: Changes in the electronic and magnetic properties of graphene induced by the presence of semiconducting oxide or magnetic nanoparticles (see picture) are driven by charge-transfer interactions. The effects are examined by spectroscopic, magnetic, and theoretical studies.

    4. Microscopic Diffusion Dynamics of Silver Complex-Based Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids Probed by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering (pages 944–950)

      Dr. Eugene Mamontov, Dr. Gary A. Baker, Dr. Huimin Luo and Dr. Sheng Dai

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201001017

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silver service: The structure of the room-temperature ionic liquids studied (see picture) affects their microscopic diffusion dynamics, which has been investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering. At 300 to 340 K, the scattering momentum transfer dependence of the data provides evidence for three distinct diffusion components.

    5. Computational Investigation of the Effect of pH on the Color of Firefly Bioluminescence by DFT (pages 951–960)

      Dr. Luís Pinto da Silva and Prof. Dr. Joaquim C. G. Esteves da Silva

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000980

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      Two colors, one emitter: DFT calculations based on determination of dissociation and tautomeric constants predict that the Keto-(−1) form of oxyluciferin (see picture) is responsible for both yellow-green and red firefly bioluminescence. Multicolor bioluminescence is achieved by interactions of the emitter with active-site molecules, and their modulation and rearrangement by different active-site microenvironments corresponding to the open and closed conformation of luciferase.

    6. Triplication of the Photocurrent in Dye Solar Cells by Increasing the Elongation of the π-conjugation in Zn-Porphyrin Sensitizers (pages 961–965)

      Dr. Eva M. Barea, Dr. Rubén Caballero, Leticia López-Arroyo, Dr. Antonio Guerrero, Dr. Pilar de la Cruz, Prof. Fernando Langa and Prof. Juan Bisquert

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000958

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      Taking it all in: A new Zn-porphyrin sensitizer bridged with a oligothienylenevinylene unit shows a threefold enhancement of the photocurrent with respect to the parent dyes (see graphs). This is caused by an additional strong absorption in the region 400–650 nm that leads to flat IPCE of 60 % in this region. PL measurements and DFT calculations, respectively, suggest that increased injection and red-shift of the absorption bands are the reason for an improved cell performance.

    7. Nanoparticulate Hollow TiO2 Fibers as Light Scatterers in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly Parameters and Mechanism (pages 966–973)

      Masoud Rahman, Dr. Fariba Tajabadi, Leyla Shooshtari and Dr. Nima Taghavinia 

      Article first published online: 17 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000950

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light scattering and trapping are exhibited by nanoparticulate hollow TiO2 fibers (see picture) prepared by layer-by-layer deposition of TiO2 nanoparticles on cellulose fiber templates and subsequent thermal template removal. They show promise for applications in dye-sensitized solar cells due to their large surface areas and light-scattering and light-trapping properties.

    8. Detailed Characterization of the Dynamics of Ibuprofen in the Solid State by a Multi-Technique NMR Approach (pages 974–981)

      Elisa Carignani, Dr. Silvia Borsacchi and Dr. Marco Geppi

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000946

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dynamics in solids: By combining several tools offered by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, it is possible to characterize in detail the dynamic processes occurring in small organic molecules. The internal rotations and interconformational jumps of ibuprofen (see picture) in the solid state are characterized by the simultaneous analysis of a wide variety of NMR observables sensitive to dynamics.

    9. Study of the Efficiency of UV and Visible-Light Photocatalytic Oxidation of Methanol on Mesoporous RuO2–TiO2 Nanocomposites (pages 982–991)

      Dr. Adel A. Ismail, Dr. Lars Robben and Prof. Detlef W. Bahnemann

      Article first published online: 4 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000936

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      Seeing the light: Mesoporous RuO2–TiO2 nanocomposites with different RuO2 concentrations are described. The measured photonic efficiency ξ=0.53 % at 0.5 wt % RuO2–TiO2 for CH3OH oxidation under visible light is maximal (see picture). However, the addition of RuO2 suppresses the photonic efficiency of TiO2 under UV light.

    10. Surface-Enhanced Fluorescence from Fluorophore-Assembled Monolayers by Using Ag@SiO2 Nanoparticles (pages 992–998)

      Dr. Ruohu Zhang, Prof. Dr. Zhuyuan Wang, Dr. Chunyuan Song, Dr. Jing Yang, Dr. Jin Li, Dr. Asma Sadaf and Prof. Dr. Yiping Cui

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000849

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      Lit from below: A surface-enhanced fluorescence effect was obtained by a very simple procedure based on Ag@SiO2 nanoparticles. Some factors that influence the fluorescence enhancement were studied, such as the surface density of the nanoparticles and the shell thickness (see figure; RB=Rose Bengal).

    11. Steric and Chain Length Effects in the (equation image×equation image)R30° Structures of Alkanethiol Self-Assembled Monolayers on Au(111) (pages 999–1009)

      Dr. Edmanuel Torres, Dr. Alexander T. Blumenau and Dr. P. Ulrich Biedermann

      Article first published online: 10 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000803

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      Showing potential: The translational and orientational potential energy surfaces of n-alkanethiols with up to four carbon atoms are studied for (equation image×equation image)R30° self-assembled monolayers (SAMs, see picture). The binding energies with the van der Waals interactions corrected using MP2 calculations increase by about 1 kcal mol−1 per CH2 group. This trend and the increasingly confined accessible range of the tilt angles may contribute to the higher order observed in long-chain thiol SAMs on gold.

    12. Electroluminescent Properties of an Electrochemically Cross-Linkable Carbazole Peripheral Poly(Benzyl Ether) Dendrimer (pages 1010–1015)

      Dr. Jin Young Park, Dong-Eun Kim, Dr. Ramakrishna Ponnapati, Prof. Jong-Min Kim, Prof. Young-Soo Kwon and Prof. Rigoberto C. Advincula

      Article first published online: 8 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000785

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electroluminescent properties of a carbazole-terminated poly(benzyl ether) dendrimer (picture, top) doped into a PVK:PBD host matrix with double-layer device configuration (picture, bottom) are investigated. Different concentrations of the guest material can control device efficiency. Two excited states (exciplex and electroplex) generated at the interfaces of PVK/G3-cbz DN and PBD result in competitive emission, showing broad band in EL spectra.

  8. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Intrinsic CO2 Permeability of Cell Membranes and Potential Biological Relevance of CO2 Channels (pages 1017–1019)

      Prof. Dr. Walter F. Boron, Dr. Volker Endeward, Prof. Dr. Gerolf Gros, Dr. Raif Musa-Aziz and Prof. Dr. Peter Pohl

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201100034

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      The past dozen years has seen a series of papers that come to the conclusion that CO2 passes through certain aquaporins and Rhesus proteins. The past three years has seen another series of papers that come to the conclusion that protein channels could not make a meaningful contribution to overall CO2 membrane permeability because of a combination of: 1) a high CO2 permeability of membrane lipids and 2) large unstirred layers, which would render their CO2 resistance much higher than that of a biological membrane. Is this also true for a membrane crowded with proteins? This comment summarizes the current status of the debate.

  9. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. A Decade of Debate: Significance of CO2 Permeation through Membrane Channels still Controversial (pages 1021–1022)

      Prof. Bert L. de Groot and Dr. Jochen S. Hub

      Article first published online: 23 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201000974

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      Active or passive? An interesting and lively discussion on the role of aquaporins and rhesus channels in the permeation of gases such as carbon dioxide across biological membranes unfolded during the Epithelial Transport Workshop, held in Strobl, Austria, from June 25–27, 2010, organized by the German Biophysical Society and the Johannes Kepler University of Linz.

  10. Preview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Cover
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Correspondence
    10. Conference Report
    11. Preview
    1. Preview: ChemPhysChem 6/2011 (page 1023)

      Article first published online: 25 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201190023

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