ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 1

January 14, 2013

Volume 14, Issue 1

Pages 1–251

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Mechanistic Studies on the Transformation of Ethanol into Ethene over Fe-ZSM-5 Zeolite (ChemPhysChem 1/2013) (page 1)

      Thana Maihom, Dr. Pipat Khongpracha, Dr. Jakkapan Sirijaraensre and Prof. Dr. Jumras Limtrakul

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390000

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      Computational chemistry can be used to unlock the door to mechanisms of industrially important reactions. On p. 101 the reaction mechanisms of transformation of ethanol over zeolite serving as a nanometer-sized chemical reactor are unraveled by J. Limtrakul et al. using an advanced DFT approach.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Fluorescence Study of Energy Transfer in PMMA Polymers with Pendant Oligo-Phenylene-Ethynylenes (ChemPhysChem 1/2013) (page 2)

      Johann Schäfer, Alexander Breul, Dr. Eckard Birckner, Dr. Martin D. Hager, Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Popp and Prof. Dr. Benjamin Dietzek

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390003

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      Energy migration between trimeric oligo-phenylene-ethynylenes pendant to poly-methyl-metacrylic polymers causes a fast decay of fluorescence anisotropy after selective excitation by linearly polarized laser pulses. The excitation energy finally is trapped by a brigthly fluorescent acceptor dye, as shown on p. 170 by B. Dietzek et al.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      A Good Thing just Got Better (pages 3–5)

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201201018

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
  4. Editors' Selection

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. Accelerating Research (page 24)

      Version of Record online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201201052

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. Information Processing with Molecules—Quo Vadis? (pages 28–46)

      Dr. Uwe Pischel, Prof. Dr. Joakim Andréasson, Prof. Dr. Devens Gust and Vânia F. Pais

      Version of Record online: 11 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200157

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      On its way: In this review the latest trends in the application of Boolean logic for molecular information processing are discussed. This includes the design of all-photonic devices, applications for prodrug activation, drug delivery, diagnostics, and the creation of intelligent materials.

  7. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. Recent Progress and Challenges in Graphene Nanoribbon Synthesis (pages 47–54)

      Liang Ma, Prof. Jinlan Wang and Dr. Feng Ding

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200253

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      Making ribbons: Synthetic methods for graphene nanoribbons, including unzipping of carbon nanotubes, lithographic patterning and plasma etching of graphene, cutting of graphene sheets by metal nanoparticles or oxidation, and chemical synthesis (see picture), are reviewed from both experimental and theoretical viewpoints, and advantages and disadvantages of these methods are compared.

    2. Self-Assembled Monolayers with Dynamicity Stemming from (Bio)Chemical Conversions: From Construction to Application (pages 55–69)

      Inseong Choi and Prof. Woon-Seok Yeo

      Version of Record online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200293

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      Dynamic surfaces: Construction and applications of dynamic surfaces on which surface properties can be modulated by an external stimulus on user demand are reviewed, with focus on self-assembled monolayers with dynamicity that stems from (bio)chemical conversions on the surface in response to stimuli such as electrical potential, light, enzymes, and pH (see picture).

  8. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. Metal-Supported Aluminosilicate Ultrathin Films as a Versatile Tool for Studying the Surface Chemistry of Zeolites (pages 71–77)

      Dr. Shamil Shaikhutdinov and Prof. Dr. Hans-Joachim Freund

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200826

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      Monolayer zeolite? The application of a variety of “surface-science” techniques to elucidate the surface structures and mechanisms of chemical reactions at zeolite surfaces has long been considered as almost impossible. The growth of a thin aluminosilicate film on a metal single crystal under controlled conditions results in adequate and well-defined model systems for zeolite surfaces.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. Preference towards Five-Coordination in Ti Silicalite-1 upon Molecular Adsorption (pages 79–83)

      Erik Gallo, Dr. Francesca Bonino, Dr. Janine C. Swarbrick, Dr. Taras Petrenko, Dr. Andrea Piovano, Prof. Silvia Bordiga, Dr. Diego Gianolio, Dr. Elena Groppo, Prof. Frank Neese, Prof. Carlo Lamberti and Dr. Pieter Glatzel

      Version of Record online: 26 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200893

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      One is enough! The changes of the electronic structure induced by the adsorption of water and ammonia in the catalyst titanium silicalite-1 (TS-1) are investigated by means of (resonant) valence-to-core X-ray emission spectroscopy. Based on spectra simulations using density functional theory it is concluded, contrary to the widely accepted view, that the Ti-sites of TS-1 can coordinate only one molecule of ammonia and water (see picture).

    2. Silicon Nanocrystal Superlattices (pages 84–87)

      Yixuan Yu, Christian A. Bosoy, Dr. Colin M. Hessel, Dr. Detlef-M. Smilgies and Prof. Brian A. Korgel

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200738

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      Colloidal silicon nanocrystal superlattices: Nanocrystal superlattices are finally made of the most commercially relevant semiconductor, silicon. These sterically-stabilized nanocrystals self-assemble into face-centered cubic superlattices (see picture). Their thermal stability is much more robust than other types of nanocrystal superlattices because of the strong covalent bonding of the hydrocarbon capping layer.

    3. Modeling the Impact of Solid Surfaces in Thermal Degradation Processes (pages 88–91)

      Dr. Christian Tuma, Dr. Teodoro Laino, Dr. Elyette Martin, Dr. Steffen Stolz and Dr. Alessandro Curioni

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200921

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      First-principles simulations are carried out to generate reaction profiles for the initial steps of the thermal decomposition of glycerol, propylene glycol, and triacetin over the surfaces of pseudo-amorphous carbon and silica, crystalline zirconia [001], and crystalline alumina (0001).

    4. Assemblies at the Liquid-Solid Interface: Chirality Expression from Molecular Conformers (pages 92–95)

      Dr. Yong-Tao Shen, Dr. Ning-Bo Zhu, Xue-Mei Zhang, Prof. Shengbin Lei, Prof. Zhongqing Wei, Dr. Min Li, Prof. Dahui Zhao, Prof. Qing-Dao Zeng and Prof. Chen Wang

      Version of Record online: 9 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200730

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      Two foldamer molecular conformers and their self-assemblies are investigated by STM at liquid/solid interfaces. A chiral structure can be obtained both from the adsorption of the two different conformers and from the assemblies formed at the liquid–solid interface. This finding suggests a convenient approach to controlling and fabricating 2D chiral nanostructures.

    5. STM-Based Molecular Junction of Carbon Nano-Onion (pages 96–100)

      Dr. Slawomir Sek, Joanna Breczko, Dr. Marta E. Plonska-Brzezinska, Dr. Agnieszka Z. Wilczewska and Prof. Luis Echegoyen

      Version of Record online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200624

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      Get to know the onion: Conductance measurements for functionalized carbon nano-onions were conducted using an STM-based molecular junction approach (see picture). It was found that electron transmission through these systems occurs by a tunneling mechanism. The carbon-based core seems to provide a very efficient medium for electron transmission, with conductance values comparable to those of metallic nanowires.

  10. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Editorial
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Editors' Selection
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Minireviews
    9. Concept
    10. Communications
    11. Articles
    1. Mechanistic Studies on the Transformation of Ethanol into Ethene over Fe-ZSM-5 Zeolite (pages 101–107)

      Thana Maihom, Dr. Pipat Khongpracha, Dr. Jakkapan Sirijaraensre and Prof. Dr. Jumras Limtrakul

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200786

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      An alcohol-free product: The reaction mechanisms of ethanol transformation into ethene over Fe-ZSM-5 zeolite (see picture) are investigated by means of density functional calculations with the M06-L functional. A 34T nanocluster model of the zeolite (T=Si or Al) is employed to examine both the stepwise and concerted mechanisms of transformation.

    2. The Generalized Energy-Based Fragmentation Approach with an Improved Fragmentation Scheme: Benchmark Results and Illustrative Applications (pages 108–115)

      Shugui Hua, Wei Li and Prof. Shuhua Li

      Version of Record online: 13 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200867

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      A new strategy: Two-fragment-centered primitive subsystems are constructed for the generalized energy-based fragmentation (GEBF) approach. With this strategy, the accuracy of the GEBF approach is significantly improved for large systems with compact structures.

    3. The Electrochemical Properties of Nanocomposite Films Obtained by Chemical In Situ Polymerization of Aniline and Carbon Nanostructures (pages 116–124)

      Dr. Marta E. Plonska-Brzezinska, Joanna Breczko, Dr. Barbara Palys and Prof. Dr. Luis Echegoyen

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200759

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      Conducting nanocomposites: Different types of nanocomposites including carbon nanostructures (CNs) and polyaniline (PANI) are prepared, and their morphological and electrical properties are determined and compared. The thickness and structure of the CN/PANI films are characterized by scanning electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy, and the electrochemical properties of the composites are investigated.

    4. Polariton Dynamics under Strong Light–Molecule Coupling (pages 125–131)

      Dr. Tal Schwartz, Dr. James A. Hutchison, Dr. Jérémie Léonard, Dr. Cyriaque Genet, Prof. Stefan Haacke and Prof. Thomas W. Ebbesen

      Version of Record online: 11 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200734

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      Long-lived polariton: In organic cavities, the hybrid light–matter states display intricate dynamics due to the molecular nature of such systems. The authors investigate these dynamics and find that the polariton is surprisingly long-lived.

    5. Ultrafast Photodynamics of the Indoline Dye D149 Adsorbed to Porous ZnO in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 132–139)

      Egmont Rohwer, Christoph Richter, Nadine Heming, Kerstin Strauch, Dr. Christian Litwinski, Prof. Tebello Nyokong, Prof. Derck Schlettwein and Prof. Heinrich Schwoerer

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200715

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      Good morning, sunshine! The ultrafast dynamics of the photoinduced electron transfer between surface-adsorbed indoline D149 dye and porous ZnO as used in the working electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells is investigated by means of transient absorption spectroscopy (see picture). The addition of the redox electrolyte to the system results in faster regeneration times.

    6. (110)-Oriented ZIF-8 Thin Films on ITO with Controllable Thickness (pages 140–144)

      Dr. Chuantao Hou, Prof. Qin Xu, Dr. Jinyun Peng, Zhengping Ji and Xiaoya Hu

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200677

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      Layer it down: (110)-oriented zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 thin films with controllable thickness are successfully deposited on self-assmbled monolayer-modified indium tin oxide electrodes at room temperature (see picture).

    7. Anion–π Interactions Involving [MXn]m Anions: A Comprehensive Theoretical Study (pages 145–154)

      Carolina Estarellas, Dr. David Quiñonero, Prof. Dr. Pere M. Deyà and Prof. Antonio Frontera

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200654

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      Lay it down: A systematic study on the geometric and energetic features of anion–π complexes, wherein the anion is a metal complex of a variety of different shapes and charges, is performed (see picture). The influence of [MXn]m on the anion–π interaction and how the binding energy depends on the coordination index, the geometric features, and the different orientations adopted by the metallic anion are analyzed.

    8. Resonance Raman Spectral Imaging of Intracellular Uptake of β-Carotene Loaded Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) Nanoparticles (pages 155–161)

      Dr. Christian Matthäus, Dr. Stephanie Schubert, Prof. Michael Schmitt, Dr. Christoph Krafft, Prof. Benjamin Dietzek, Prof. Ulrich S. Schubert and Prof. Jürgen Popp

      Version of Record online: 12 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200577

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      Non-invasive imaging: Cells were incubated with poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide)/β-carotene nanoparticles for different time periods. The figure shows a Raman image of a cell, with the distribution of the particles shown in red.

    9. Stabilization of Large Adsorbates by Rotational Entropy: A Time-Resolved Variable-Temperature STM Study (pages 162–169)

      Thomas Waldmann, Jens Klein, Prof. Dr. Harry E. Hoster and Prof. Dr. R. Jürgen Behm

      Version of Record online: 9 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200531

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      Big is best: Bis(terpyridine) adsorbates on a Ag(111) surface in combination with large data sets from scanning tunneling microscopy and statistical mechanics calculations are used as a model system for entropic stabilization of large rotating adsorbates (see picture). The general validity of this concept is tested for other typical small, mid-sized and large adsorbates.

    10. Fluorescence Study of Energy Transfer in PMMA Polymers with Pendant Oligo-Phenylene-Ethynylenes (pages 170–178)

      Johann Schäfer, Alexander Breul, Dr. Eckard Birckner, Dr. Martin D. Hager, Prof. Dr. Ulrich S. Schubert, Prof. Dr. Jürgen Popp and Prof. Dr. Benjamin Dietzek

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200545

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      Fluorescence depolarization by energy migration: Energy migration between individual oligo-phenylene-ethynylenes pendant to a polymer backbone as well as energy transfer from blue-emitting donors to red-emitting acceptors (see picture) is investigated by means of fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Emission anisotropy measurements indicate fluorescence depolarization due to energy migration.

    11. Theoretical Studies on Muti-Hydroxyimides as Highly Efficient Catalysts for Aerobic Oxidation (pages 179–184)

      Dr. Kexian Chen, Dr. Lu Jia, Dr. Rina Dao, Prof. Dr. Jia Yao, Prof. Dr. Congmin Wang, Prof. Dr. Zhirong Chen and Prof. Dr. Haoran Li

      Version of Record online: 28 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200865

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      Why more reactive? The high performance of muti-hydroxyimide organocatalysts in aerobic-oxidation applications can be ascribed to their multiple intramolecular radicals with enhanced electron-withdrawing effects, as revealed by density functional theory calculations (see picture). This pivotal characteristic provides new insights for the further design of highly efficient catalysts for industrial applications.

    12. Combining Spectroscopy and Theory to Evaluate Structural Models of Metalloenzymes: A Case Study on the Soluble [NiFe] Hydrogenase from Ralstonia eutropha (pages 185–191)

      Marius Horch, Yvonne Rippers, Prof. Maria A. Mroginski, Prof. Peter Hildebrandt and Dr. Ingo Zebger

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200853

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      Understanding spectroscopy: Theoretical studies on model compounds are demonstrated as efficient tools for evaluating structural and mechanistic proposals for redox enzymes, exemplified on the basis of the oxygen tolerance mechanism of a [NiFe] hydrogenase (see picture).

    13. Eu2+ & Mn2+-Coactivated Ba3Gd(PO4)3 Orange-Yellow-Emitting Phosphor with Tunable Color Tone for UV-Excited White LEDs (pages 192–197)

      Dr. Ning Guo, Wei Lü, Yongchao Jia, Wenzhen Lv, Qi Zhao and Prof. Hongpeng You

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200836

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      The warmness factor: An Eu2+ and Mn2+-coactivated Ba3Gd(PO4)3 phosphor is presented which contains more red-emitting component, compared to the commercial YAG:Ce phosphor, and possesses favorable properties for application in warm white light-emitting diodes with low correlated color temperature (see picture).

    14. Photoinduced Triplet–Triplet Energy Transfer in a 2-Ureido-4(1H)-Pyrimidinone-Bridged, Quadruply Hydrogen-Bonded Ferrocene–Fullerene Assembly (pages 198–203)

      Dr. Ke Feng, Dr. Mao-Lin Yu, Dr. Su-Min Wang, Dr. Ge-Xia Wang, Prof. Dr. Chen-Ho Tung and Prof. Dr. Li-Zhu Wu

      Version of Record online: 30 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200818

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      Unexpectedly effective intra-assembly triplet–triplet energy transfer is revealed in the depicted 2-ureido-4(1H)-pyrimidinone-bridged ferrocene–fullerene assembly by steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopy, whereas the electron-transfer process from the ferrocene to the singlet or triplet excited state of the fullerene is inefficient, although the electron-transfer reactions are thermodynamically feasible.

    15. Structure Sensitivity of CO Oxidation on Co3O4: A DFT Study (pages 204–212)

      Prof. Dr. Xian-Yong Pang, Chang Liu, Dui-Chun Li, Prof. Cun-Qin Lv and Prof. Dr. Gui-Chang Wang 

      Version of Record online: 23 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200807

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      Different mechanisms of CO oxidation depending on the surface structure of Co3O4 are found by DFT calculations, which also show that CO oxidation on Co3O4 (110)-B has higher activity than that on Co3O4(111)-B (see reaction energy profiles in the picture), that is, it is a structure sensitive reaction.

    16. Matrix Isolation-Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopy of 3-Butyn-2-ol and its Binary Aggregates (pages 213–219)

      Dr. Christian Merten and Prof. Dr. Yunjie Xu

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200758

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      Good vibrations: Good mirror-image matrix isolation-vibrational circular dichroism (MI-VCD) spectra of the two enantiomers of 3-butyn-2-ol are achieved in low-temperature matrices (see picture). The well-resolved experimental MI-VCD bands provide the essential mean to assign associated vibrational absorption spectral features correctly. By varying the matrix temperature, it is possible to follow the self-aggregation of the chiral alcohol.

    17. Alkali-Metal Azides Interacting with Metal–Organic Frameworks (pages 220–226)

      Dr. Nerina Armata, Dr. Remedios Cortese, Prof. Dario Duca and Prof. Roberto Triolo

      Version of Record online: 19 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200752

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      Stabilization of alkali-metal azides by interaction with metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) is studied for differently sized MOF fragments (e.g. see figure) at the density functional theory level. The interactions involve several moieties of both MOFs and MN3 (M=Li, Na, K, Rb, Cs). This suggests that MOFs are suitable candidates for trapping high energy density materials.

    18. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Cationic Complexes of Hydrogen with Helium (pages 227–232)

      Peter Bartl, Dr. Christian Leidlmair, Dr. Stephan Denifl, Prof. Dr. Paul Scheier and Prof. Dr. Olof Echt

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200664

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      Trapping helium on hydrogen: Helium nanodroplets are doped with hydrogen or deuterium and subsequently ionized by electron impact. Cationic complexes of Hx+ (x=1, 2, 3,…) with up to 30 helium atoms are identified in the high-resolution mass spectra. Pronounced anomalies in the size dependence of their abundance indicate particularly stable helium–hydrogen complexes (see picture).

    19. Chlorine-Enhanced Surface Mobility of Au(100) (pages 233–236)

      Mostafa Mesgar, Dr. Payam Kaghazchi, Prof. Dr. Timo Jacob, Dr. Ernesto Pichardo-Pedrero, Dr. Margret Giesen, Dr. Ernesto Pichardo-Pedrero, Dr. Margret Giesen, Prof. Dr. Harald Ibach, Dr. Noelia B. Luque and Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Schmickler

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200621

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      Mobile metal: Experiments and a combination of quantum-chemical calculations with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that adsorbed chloride enhances the surface mobility of gold electrodes and increases the rate of Ostwald ripening of gold islands.

    20. Parallel Interactions at Large Horizontal Displacement in Pyridine–Pyridine and Benzene–Pyridine Dimers (pages 237–243)

      Dragan B. Ninković, Jelena M. Andrić and Prof. Dr. Snežana D. Zarić

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200607

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      This way or that: In crystal structures from the Cambridge Structural Database preferred parallel pyridine–pyridine interactions are observed at large horizontal displacements (4.0–6.0 Å, see picture) and not at an offset of 1.5 Å, which had the lowest calculated energy.

    21. Impacts of Composition and Post-Treatment on the Brønsted Acidity of Steam-Treated Faujasite: Insights from FTIR Spectroscopy (pages 244–251)

      Dr. Olivier Cairon

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200568

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      The acid test: The effects of steaming and acid leaching on protonated Y faujasite and EMT zeolites are studied by FTIR spectroscopy. Brønsted acidic evolution and strength measurements are performed for a series of modified zeolites using CO as a probe. A correlation combining Δν(OH), ν(CO) position and Hammett H0 values is proposed together with Si/framework Al (AlF) dependence for structural IR high-frequency (HF)OH groups (see picture).

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