ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 12

August 26, 2013

Volume 14, Issue 12

Pages 2605–2864

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Elucidating Inorganic Nanoscale Species in Solution: Complementary and Corroborative Approaches (ChemPhysChem 12/2013) (page 2605)

      Anna F. Oliveri, Edward W. Elliott III, Dr. Matthew E. Carnes, Prof. Dr. James E. Hutchison and Prof. Dr. Darren W. Johnson

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390056

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      Size measurements can describe a number of different dimensions for a well-defined inorganic nanoscale species (core, shell, solvation sphere). Since many of the techniques used to measure size depend on significant and sometimes destructive sample preparations, an additional challenge is defining what size means for a nanoscale species in solution. Techniques such as SAXS, DOSY, and DLS are ideal for determining these dimensions in solution. J. E. Hutchison, D. W. Johnson et al. illustrate on p. 2655 complementary techniques that can be used together to unveil more information about the material in question. The pictured corroborative techniques can make multiple measurements of the same property.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Theoretical Photodynamic Study of the Photoprotolytic Cycle of Firefly Oxyluciferin (ChemPhysChem 12/2013) (page 2606)

      Dr. Luís Pinto da Silva, Dr. Ron Simkovitch, Prof. Dr. Dan Huppert and Prof. Dr. Joaquim C. G. Esteves da Silva

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390057

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      On p. 2711 J. C. G. Esteves da Silva et al. examine why the fluorescence of firefly oxyluciferin in aqueous solution is pH-sensitive, even though there is only one emitting species: the enolate anion. The pH-sensitive fluorescence is explained by the formation of enolate stacking complexes, which adopt different conformations with different pH values, thus leading to the emission of different wavelenghts.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPhysChem 12/2013 (pages 2607–2616)

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390058

  3. Editors' Selection

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. Editors' Selection: ChemPhysChem 12/2013 (page 2617)

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390059

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
  5. Minireviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. Solution-Processable Graphene Quantum Dots (pages 2627–2640)

      Xuejiao Zhou, Prof. Shouwu Guo and Prof. Jingyan Zhang

      Article first published online: 3 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300111

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      Hits the spot! Recent progress in solution-processable graphene quantum dots (SGQDs) is described. Advances in the preparation, modification, properties, and applications of SGQDs are also highlighted in detail (see picture).

    2. A Brief Overview of Some Physical Studies on the Relaxation Dynamics and Förster Resonance Energy Transfer of Semiconductor Quantum Dots (pages 2641–2653)

      Dr. Suparna Sadhu and Prof. Amitava Patra

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201201059

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      Size, shape, and composition matter: The relaxation dynamics and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) and the way these phenomena change with size, shape, and composition of the QDs is reviewed. A stochastic model of carrier relaxation dynamics in the QDs is proposed to correlate with the experimental results. QD-based energy-transfer processes offer exciting opportunities for future applications.

  6. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. Elucidating Inorganic Nanoscale Species in Solution: Complementary and Corroborative Approaches (pages 2655–2661)

      Anna F. Oliveri, Edward W. Elliott III, Dr. Matthew E. Carnes, Prof. Dr. James E. Hutchison and Prof. Dr. Darren W. Johnson

      Article first published online: 24 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300188

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      SAXS sells: Defining the dimensions of a nanoscale material in solution is non-trivial. Complementary size measurements may describe a number of different material dimensions such as that of the core, shell, or solvation sphere. The determination of the full range of material properties requires multiple techniques in order to corroborate solution and solid-state structures.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. Novel Synthesis of Porous Silver Nanostructures Using a Starch Template and Their Applications toward Plasmonic Sensors (pages 2663–2666)

      Bomi Kim, Seong Cheol Hong, Seongho Jung, Jutaek Nam, Jiwon Bang and Prof. Sungjee Kim

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300278

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      A novel method to prepare nanoporous silver structures (NPSs) is introduced. Soluble starch is used as the in situ template, and an aqueous AgNO3 solution is used as the silver precursor. The porous NPS film is introduced in a plasmonic sensor using the Kretschmann configuration. The obtained device responds well to environmental reflective-index changes.

    2. Excimer Formation by Stacking G-Quadruplex Blocks (pages 2667–2671)

      Dr. Nguyen Thuan Dao, Dr. Reinhard Haselsberger, Prof. Dr. Maria-Elisabeth Michel-Beyerle and Prof. Dr. Anh Tuân Phan

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300481

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      A special stack: In the presence of K+ ions, a specific guanine-rich DNA sequence forms a stacked G-quadruplex dimer giving rise to excimer emission in the 400 nm region. This emission with nanosecond lifetime occurs only for a particular base overlap pattern between two stacked G-quadruplex blocks and can be manipulated by changing DNA sequence and external conditions.

    3. Remarkable Properties of ZnO Heavily Substituted with Nitrogen and Fluorine, ZnO1-x(N,F)x (pages 2672–2677)

      Rana Saha, Srikanth Revoju, Vinay I. Hegde, Prof. Umesh V. Waghmare, Prof. A. Sundaresan and Prof. C. N. R. Rao

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300305

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      Two kinds in a box: The electronic and optical properties of ZnO substituted with nitrogen and fluorine are studied both experimentally and theoretically. The presence of fluorine enhances the incorporation of nitrogen in the lattice. Co-substitution reduces the optical band gap of ZnO significantly and increases the dielectric constant. The long-wavelength visible absorption of N, F-ZnO is reflected in its bright orange color (see picture).

  8. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. Assessing Solvation Effects on Chemical Reactions with Globally Optimized Solvent Clusters (pages 2678–2686)

      Dr. Yan Li and Prof. Dr. Bernd Hartke

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300323

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      Waterworld: The influence of water solvent on the Menshutkin reaction of methyl chloride with ammonia is investigated by using static, quantum chemical calculations. Large, explicit, and globally structure-optimized water clusters are employed around the reaction center in a mixed explicit/implicit solvent model. Certain water clusters can completely annihilate the sizeable activation barrier of 23.5 kcal mol−1.

    2. Force Distribution Analysis of Mechanochemically Reactive Dimethylcyclobutene (pages 2687–2697)

      Dr. Wenjin Li, Prof. Scott A. Edwards, Prof. Lanyuan Lu, Dr. Tomas Kubar, Sandeep P. Patil, Prof. Helmut Grubmüller, Dr. Gerrit Groenhof and Dr. Frauke Gräter

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300252

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      Taking the strain: Pulling dimethylcyclobutene by an external force to mimic force spectroscopy experiments (upper left picture) or by internal stresses in strained molecular force probes (lower left) both result in accelerated ring opening. Although an external force distributes into the reactive molecule in a symmetric and linear manner (upper right), strained macrocycles feature an asymmetric force distribution (lower right).

    3. Lithium-Functionalized Metal–Organic Frameworks that Show >10 wt % H2 Uptake at Ambient Temperature (pages 2698–2703)

      Dr. Sang Soo Han, Dr. Dong Hyun Jung, Dr. Seung-Hoon Choi and Prof. Jiyoung Heo

      Article first published online: 19 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300225

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      Grand designs: Grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations with a first-principles-based force field show that metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) with Li functional groups (i.e. C[BOND]Li bonds) offer exceptional H2 uptake at ambient temperature (see picture). For example, at 298 K and 100 bar, IRMOF-1-4Li shows a total H2 uptake of 5.54 wt % and MOF-200-27Li exhibits a total H2 uptake of 10.30 wt %, much higher than the corresponding values with pristine MOFs.

    4. Electrorheological Effect and Electro-Optical Properties of Side-on Liquid Crystalline Polysiloxane in a Nematic Solvent (pages 2704–2710)

      Dr. Kosuke Kaneko, Kodai Oto, Toshiaki Kawai, Dr. Hyunseok Choi, Prof. Dr. Hirotsugu Kikuchi and Prof. Dr. Naotake Nakamura

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300093

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      It's in the mix: The electrorheological (ER) effect of a “side-on′′ liquid crystalline polysiloxane is investigated as well as its mixtures with a low-molar nematic liquid crystal (5CB) in order to improve the response behavior to the applied electric field. The composites respond faster to the applied electric field and have improved electro-optical properties.

    5. Theoretical Photodynamic Study of the Photoprotolytic Cycle of Firefly Oxyluciferin (pages 2711–2716)

      Dr. Luís Pinto da Silva, Dr. Ron Simkovitch, Prof. Dr. Dan Huppert and Prof. Dr. Joaquim C. G. Esteves da Silva

      Article first published online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300330

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      A pH-sensitive fluorophore: Different conformations of the π–π stacking complex of the excited-state enolate species of firefly oxyluciferin lead to pH-sensitive fluorescence. This means that the enolate anion possesses different emission energies at acidic/neutral and basic pH.

    6. Highly Efficient Singlet–Singlet Energy Transfer in Light-Harvesting [60,70]Fullerene–4-Amino-1,8-naphthalimide Dyads (pages 2717–2724)

      Patricia Remón, Cátia Parente Carvalho, Dr. Carlos Baleizão, Prof. Dr. Mario Nuno Berberan-Santos and Dr. Uwe Pischel

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300424

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      Fullerene antenna! Quantitative singlet–singlet energy transfer in various aminonaphthalimide–fullerene (C60 and C70) dyads is observed. The aromatic imide chromophore serves effectively as an antenna for the sensitization of fullerene excited states, which are characterized by their fluorescence emission (see picture). In polar solvents, a subsequent partial quenching by electron transfer to the excited fullerene is postulated.

    7. Synthesis, Photophysics and Nonlinear Optical Properties of Stilbenoid Pyrimidine-Based Dyes Bearing Methylenepyran Donor Groups (pages 2725–2736)

      Dr. Sylvain Achelle, Dr. Jean-Pierre Malval, Dr. Stéphane Aloïse, Dr. Alberto Barsella, Dr. Arnaud Spangenberg, Dr. Loic Mager, Dr. Huriye Akdas-Kilig, Dr. Jean-Luc Fillaut, Prof. Bertrand Caro and Prof. Françoise Robin-le Guen

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300419

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      Let's get (photo)physical! The nonlinear properties and the photophysical behavior of a series of π-conjugated chromophores that incorporate an electron-deficient pyrimidine core (A) and γ-methylenepyrans as terminal donor (D) groups are thoroughly investigated.

    8. Insights into the Mechanism of the Reaction between Tetrachloro-p-Benzoquinone and Hydrogen Peroxide and their Implications in the Catalytic Role of Water Molecules in Producing the Hydroxyl Radial (pages 2737–2743)

      Prof. Dr. Ping Li, Dr. Weihua Wang, Dr. Qiao Sun, Dr. Zhen Li, Dr. Aijun Du, Prof. Dr. Siwei Bi and Dr. Yan Zhao

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300395

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      Water for elephants: A detailed theoretical study of the mechanism of the reaction between tetrachloro-p-benzoquinone (TCBQ) and H2O2 is reported. Explicit water molecules play an important role in promoting the formation of hydroxyl radicals (see figure). Moreover, the effects of F, Br, and CH3 substituents on this reaction are also reported.

    9. CO Adsorption on N2-Precovered NaY Faujasite: A FTIR Analysis of the Resulting Adsorbed Species (pages 2744–2749)

      Dr. Olivier Cairon

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300369

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      One, out, or double-up: CO adsorption (77 K) on two distinct sets of N2-precovered (low and medium) NaY faujasites is analyzed. The continuous desorption of N2 adducts during CO admittance to full N2 desorption for the highest CO loadings is outlined (see picture). The influence of the basic strength of the two gases is demonstrated regarding the nature of the surface-adsorbed species formed.

    10. Temperature-Independent Hole Mobility of a Smectic Liquid-Crystalline Semiconductor based on Band-Like Conduction (pages 2750–2758)

      Prof. Masahiro Funahashi, Prof. Tomohiko Ishii and Dr. Akinari Sonoda

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300362

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      Flight of fancy: Time-of-flight measurements reveal temperature-independent hole mobility in an ordered smectic phase of a phenylterthiophene derivative over a wide temperature range (see picture). This hole-transport characteristic is described by a band-conduction model with a consideration of localized levels.

    11. Theoretical Design of Strong Neutral Radical–Boron Adducts: Trisubstituted Boranes as Potential Radical Scavengers (pages 2759–2763)

      Dr. Benoît Braïda, Dr. Etienne Derat and Prof. Dr. Patrick Chaquin

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300361

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      Their strong point: Molecular orbital and valence bond analyses show that adducts of radicals .AR3 (A=C, Si, Ge) of low ionization energy with boranes BX3 of high electron affinity have strong two-center one-electron bonds. This is confirmed by ab initio calculations (see SOMOs in picture). Fluoroboranes such as B(CF3)3 should be efficient radical scavengers.

    12. Infrared Spectra of Cyanoacetaldehyde (NCCH2CHO): A Potential Prebiotic Compound of Astrochemical Interest (pages 2764–2771)

      Dr. Abdessamad Benidar, Prof. Robert Georges, Dr. Jean-Claude Guillemin, Prof. Otilia Mó and Prof. Manuel Yáñez

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300354

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      Reaching for an interstellar component: The IR spectrum of cyanoacetaldehyde is recorded within the range 4000–500 cm−1. The whole spectrum is analyzed through the use of high-level ab initio and density functional theory calculations.

    13. Enhanced Performance of Solution-Processed TESPE-ADT Thin-Film Transistors (pages 2772–2776)

      Dr. Liang-Hsiang Chen, Tarng-Shiang Hu, Dr. Peng-Yi Huang, Prof. Choongik Kim, Ching-Hao Yang, Juin-Jie Wang, Dr. Jing-Yi Yan, Dr. Jia-Chong Ho, Dr. Cheng-Chung Lee and Prof. Ming-Chou Chen

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300317

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      A solution-processed anthradithiophene derivative, 5,11-bis(4-triethylsilylphenylethynyl)anthradithiophene (TESPE-ADT), is studied for use as the semiconducting material in thin-film transistors (TFTs). Varying solution processing techniques on various gate dielectrics as well as additional post-treatment afford enhanced device performance with hole mobilities as high as ∼0.12 cm2 V−1 s−1.

    14. Effects of Oriented Surface Dipole on Photoconversion Efficiency in an Alkane/Lipid-Hybrid-Bilayer-Based Photovoltaic Model System (pages 2777–2785)

      Lixia Liu, Dr. Hong Xie, Dr. Heidi E. Bostic, Dr. Limei Jin, Prof. Michael D. Best, Prof. X. Peter Zhang and Prof. Wei Zhan

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300293

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      Danger! High voltage! The effects of oriented surface dipole on photoconversion efficiency are studied in a model photovoltaic system based on alkanethiol/lipid hybrid bilayers. This is arguably the simplest experimental setup to observe this interfacial phenomenon.

    15. Stable Aqueous Solutions of Naked Titanate Nanotubes (pages 2786–2792)

      Prof. Lucio Zennaro, Dr. Massimiliano Magro, Prof. Fabio Vianello, Prof. Adelio Rigo, Prof. Gino Mariotto, Dr. Marco Giarola, Dr. Elena Froner and Prof. Marina Scarpa

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300292

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      Highly hydrophilic titanate nanotubes show cation-sponge-like behavior and undergo multifaced exchange processes (see figure). Reversible exchange of Na+ occurs in both fast and slow regimes. The aqueous titanate nanotube solutions are stable for months.

    16. Development and Properties of Surfactant-Free Water-Dispersible Cu2ZnSnS4 Nanocrystals: A Material for Low-Cost Photovoltaics (pages 2793–2799)

      Priya Kush, Sanjeev Kumar Ujjain, Dr. Navin Chand Mehra, Dr. Pika Jha, Dr. Raj Kishore Sharma and Dr. Sasanka Deka

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300290

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      Low-cost photovoltaics: Surfactant-free water-soluble Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals are synthesized and characterized. The hydrothermal method employed is easy and inexpensive, and the environmentally friendly p-type semiconductor particles (nanocrystal ink) are stable for weeks in water. The high optical absorption (see picture), ease of annealing, and electrical properties suggest the Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals could be a low-cost efficient absorbing material for use in solid-state solar cells.

    17. Synergistic Modification of Electronic and Photocatalytic Properties of TiO2 Nanotubes by Implantation of Au and N Atoms (pages 2800–2807)

      Dr. Yingtao Zhu, Prof. Dr. Ying Dai, Dr. Kangrong Lai and Prof. Dr. Baibiao Huang

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300281

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      An Au-some Photocatalyst: Density functional calculations are performed on N-doped, Au-adsorbed and Au/N co-implanted TiO2 nanotubes (NTs). It is found that introduction of N atoms is more favorable than that of Au atoms, and Au pre-adsorption can enhance the uptake of N atoms. Furthermore, the electronic transitions in the co-implanted NTs results in a redshift of light absorption, which indicates the potential for a promising photocatalyst.

    18. Evaluation of the Structure–Activity Relationship of Rifabutin and Analogs: A Drug–Membrane Study (pages 2808–2816)

      Marina Pinheiro, Catarina Pereira-Leite, Mariana Arêde, Dr. Cláudia Nunes, João M. Caio, Dr. Cristina Moiteiro, Dr. Juan J. Giner-Casares , Dr. Marlene Lúcio, Dr. Gerald Brezesinski, Dr. Luis Camacho and Dr. Salette Reis

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300262

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      Drug–membrane interaction: The interaction of RFB and two novel analogs with a membrane model is studied. Phosphatidylcholines and cholesterol are used to mimic the cell membrane. The obtained results provide information about the relationship between the chemical structure of the antimycobacterial compounds and the changes in the biophysical properties of the membrane, such as its molecular packing.

    19. Quantum Chemical Study of the Enzymatic Repair of T(6-4)C/C(6-4)T UV-Photolesions by DNA Photolyases (pages 2817–2824)

      Dr. Shirin Faraji, Lukas Wirz and Prof. Dr. Andreas Dreuw

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300223

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      How the fix works: The molecular mechanism of DNA (6-4)-photolyase to repair T(6-4)C and C(6-4)T photoproducts is investigated by means of quantum chemical calculations. Despite the different functional groups of the pyrimidine bases involved in each particular repair process, a general valid molecular mechanism is identified, in which the initial step is an electron transfer coupled to a proton transfer, followed by an intramolecular OH/NH2 transfer step.

    20. Microwave-Assisted Synthesis of HKUST-1 and Functionalized HKUST-1-@H3PW12O40: Selective Adsorption of Heavy Metal Ions in Water Analyzed with Synchrotron Radiation (pages 2825–2832)

      Fang Zou, Runhan Yu, Rongguan Li and Prof. Wei Li

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300215

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      Keggin' the pores: Metal-organic frameworks are promising pollutant adsorbents offering high selectivity and large adsorption capacity, although their stability in water turns industrial application questionable. An improved, expeditious microwave-assisted synthesis of HKUST-1 [Cu3(1,3,5-benzene-tri-carboxilic-acid)2], along with the introduction of a Keggin-type phosphotungstate is presented, resulting in an enhanced stability in water and a higher intake of heavy metal ions.

    21. A New Multiresponsive Drug Delivery System using Smart Nanogels (pages 2833–2840)

      Dr. Gökçen Birlik Demirel and Prof. Regine von Klitzing

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300149

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      Smart drug delivery: The proof of concept for the novel use of multiresponsive nanogels as a cargo system for hydrophobic drugs is provided. These nanogels can be used as long-term delivery agents due to their dual pH/temperature-responsive behaviors, and they also allow one-shot delivery through ultrasound.

    22. The Effects of the Formation of Stone–Wales Defects on the Electronic and Magnetic Properties of Silicon Carbide Nanoribbons: A First-Principles Investigation (pages 2841–2852)

      Dr. Jia Guan, Prof. Guangtao Yu, Dr. Xiuling Ding, Prof. Wei Chen, Dr. Zhiming Shi, Prof. Xuri Huang and Prof. Chiachung Sun

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300097

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      Defective by design: On the basis of first-principles density functional theory, Stone–Wales (SW) defects are found to reduce the band gap of armchair-edged silicon carbide nanoribbons (SiCNRs); however, these defects do not alter the energy degeneracy of the ferromagnetic (FM) and antiferromagnetic (AFM) states of zigzag-edged SiCNRs (zSiCNRs), for which metallic/half-metallic and half-metallic behavior can be observed, respectively.

    23. Near-Infrared-Emitting CdxHg1−xSe Nanorods Fabricated by Ion Exchange in an Aqueous Medium (pages 2853–2858)

      Shuchi Gupta, Dr. Stephen V. Kershaw, Dr. Andrei S. Susha, Tai Lun Wong, Prof. Koichi Higashimine, Prof. Shinya Maenosono and Prof. Andrey L. Rogach

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300084

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      Changing by degree: Cation exchange is emerging as a versatile synthetic route to prepare otherwise difficult-to-form semiconductor nanostructures. In nanorods, the interplay between the initial and would-be final morphologies can lead to localized zones of cation exchange, which may be used to form interesting and useful heterostructures.

  9. Correspondence

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireviews
    7. Concept
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    10. Correspondence
    1. Notes on Valence Bond Structures for S2N2 and Related Systems (pages 2859–2864)

      Richard D. Harcourt

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300360

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      Lord of the rings: For S2N2, relationships are developed for resonance between the increased-valence structures I and II, and resonance between the Lewis structures 16 (see picture). One component of the stabilization energy for the I[LEFT RIGHT ARROW]II resonance is not dependent on the overlap of the atomic orbitals.

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