ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 14

October 7, 2013

Volume 14, Issue 14

Pages 3165–3416

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Imaging Nanocarbon Materials: Soot Particles in Flames are Not Structurally Homogeneous (ChemPhysChem 14/2013) (page 3165)

      Marina Schenk, Sydnie Lieb, Henning Vieker, Dr. André Beyer, Prof. Dr. Armin Gölzhäuser, Prof. Hai Wang and Prof. Dr. Katharina Kohse-Höinghaus

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390066

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover picture shows nascent soot particles extracted from inside a flame and probed for the first time by helium-ion microscopy. When reliably characterized, nascent soot particles smaller than 15 nm reveal structural features that remained uncovered in earlier studies by transmission electron microscopy. The results suggest that nascent soot is structurally and chemically inhomogeneous. Even the smallest particles deviate from a spherical shape, as described on p. 3248 by H. Wang, K. Kohse-Höinghaus et al.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: All-Metal Clusters that Mimic the Chemistry of Halogens (ChemPhysChem 14/2013) (page 3166)

      Tianshan Zhao, Yawei Li, Prof. Qian Wang and Prof. Puru Jena

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Au can behave like H in forming super- and hyperhalogens with Au acting either as a ligand or as a central atom. Similar to AlH4 and HF2, AlAu4 and AuF2 are superhalogens. They can also form hyperhalogens, such as Na(AlAu4)2 and AuF2[BOND]Au[BOND]AuF2, as shown on p. 3227 by Q. Wang et al.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPhysChem 14/2013 (pages 3167–3176)

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390068

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    1. Editors' Selection: ChemPhysChem 14/2013 (page 3177)

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390069

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    1. New Tools for Investigating Electromagnetic Hot Spots in Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (pages 3186–3195)

      Prof. Katherine A. Willets

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300297

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hot stuff! Correlated optical and electron microscopy allow multiple length scales to be resolved for studying hot spots in single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). This review describes techniques that improve the understanding of SERS hot spots by using both electromagnetic and electronic excitation of plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures. How both the substrate and the molecule define the hot spot is also considered.

  5. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    1. Unraveling the Pathways to UVA-Induced DNA Photodamage: (6–4) Photoproduct as a Potential “Trojan Horse” (pages 3197–3198)

      Prof. Dr. Hans-Achim Wagenknecht

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300598

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Double jeopardy: The Pyo chromophore in the (6–4) photoproduct is able to induce a secondary photoproduct in DNA by excitation with UVA light.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    1. Electrochemically Informed Synthesis: Oxidation versus Coordination of 5,6-Bis(phenylchalcogeno)acenaphthenes (pages 3199–3203)

      Dr. Fergus R. Knight, Rebecca A. M. Randall, Dr. Tracey L. Roemmele, Prof. René T. Boeré, Dr. Bela E. Bode, Luke Crawford, Prof. Michael Bühl, Prof. Alexandra M. Z. Slawin and Prof. J. Derek Woollins

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300678

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chalcogen dications: Facile synthesis of E[BOND]E bonded dications can be readily achieved. Radical cations are identified as the intermediates.

    2. Synchrotron-Based Rotationally Resolved High-Resolution FTIR Spectroscopy of Azulene and the Unidentified Infrared Bands of Astronomy (pages 3204–3208)

      Dr. Sieghard Albert, Dr. Philippe Lerch and Prof. Dr. Dr. h.c. Martin Quack

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300623

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Chasing the unidentified IR bands: The first rotationally resolved high-resolution infrared spectrum of azulene is reported using synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy including a rovibrational analysis of the out-of-plane fundamental ν44. Comparison of azulene, naphthalene, indole, and biphenyl infrared bands leads to coincidences with UIR bands at 12.8 μm with naphthalene and at 13.55 and 14.6 μm with biphenyl bands, but excluding azulene as a strong absorber.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Electron Cryo-Microscopy of TPPS4⋅2HCl Tubes Reveals a Helical Organisation Explaining the Origin of their Chirality (pages 3209–3214)

      Dr. Judith M. Short, Dr. John A. Berriman, Dr. Christian Kübel, Prof. Dr. Zoubir El-Hachemi, Dr. Jean-Valère Naubron and Prof. Dr. Teodor Silviu Balaban

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300606

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A widely studied achiral porphyrin, which is highly soluble in aqueous solutions (TPPS4), is shown to self-assemble into helical nanotubes. These were imaged by electron cryo-microscopy and a state-of-the-art image analysis allows building a map at ∼5 Å resolution, one of the highest obtained so far for molecular materials. The authors were able to trace the apparent symmetry breaking to existing nuclei in the “as received samples”, while carefully purified samples show that both handnesses occur in equal amounts.

    4. Triangular Core–Shell ZnO@SiO2 Nanoparticles (pages 3215–3220)

      Vijay Bhooshan Kumar, Prof. Aharon Gedanken and Prof. Pradip Paik

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300480

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Well packed! Core–shell nanostructures composed of ZnO particles encapsulated in an equilateral triangular SiO2 shell are reported for the first time. The quantum-confinement effects within the nanostructures can be used to tune their properties for optoelectronic applications.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Review
    6. Highlight
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    1. Establishing Consistent van der Waals Volumes of Polyatomic Ions from Crystal Structures (pages 3221–3226)

      Dr. Witali Beichel, Dr. Philipp Eiden and Prof. Dr. Ingo Krossing

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300659

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      What is the size of an ion? Van der Waals volumes (Vvdw,r) of organic salts are calculated from their crystal structures via a hard sphere approach (see picture). An ion volume partitioning scheme is proposed and various ion volumes are established. The resulting volumes exhibit low standard deviations with respect to temperature and counterion effects. Finally, Vvdw,r is shown to be suitable for volume based predictions of physical properties of ionic liquids.

    2. All-Metal Clusters that Mimic the Chemistry of Halogens (pages 3227–3232)

      Tianshan Zhao, Yawei Li, Prof. Qian Wang and Prof. Puru Jena

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300511

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sincerest form of flattery: The frontier orbitals and optical absorption spectra of the AlAu4 anion are reported. By using density functional theory, it is shown that AlAu4 not only mimics the chemistry of halogens, but also, with a vertical detachment energy (VDE) of 3.98 eV in its anionic form, that it is a superhalogen.

    3. Reactivity of Dicoordinated Stannylones (Sn0) versus Stannylenes (SnII): An Investigation Using DFT-Based Reactivity Indices (pages 3233–3247)

      Lies Broeckaert, Prof. Gernot Frenking, Prof. Paul Geerlings and Prof. Frank De Proft

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300596

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The difference of two electrons: The reactivity of dicoordinated Sn0 compounds, stannylones, is probed using density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity indices and compared with the reactivity of dicoordinated SnII compounds, stannylenes.

    4. Imaging Nanocarbon Materials: Soot Particles in Flames are Not Structurally Homogeneous (pages 3248–3254)

      Marina Schenk, Sydnie Lieb, Henning Vieker, Dr. André Beyer, Prof. Dr. Armin Gölzhäuser, Prof. Hai Wang and Prof. Dr. Katharina Kohse-Höinghaus

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300581

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flaming hot: Helium-ion microscopy (HIM) is used for the first time to image nascent soot nanoparticles. HIM is ideal for rapid and reliable probing of the structural features of nanocarbon materials. HIM can probe down to a particle size of around 5 nm without loss of contrast, even after multiple exposures.

    5. Synthesis of the Natural Product Building Block 5-(3-Bromophenyl)-4-hydroxy-5-methylhexan-2-one and its Chiral Characterization by Using Chiroptical Spectroscopy (pages 3255–3262)

      Ewoud De Gussem, Jelle Cornelus, Sam Pieters, Dries Van den Bossche, Prof. Dr. Johan Van der Eycken, Prof. Dr. Wouter Herrebout and Prof. Dr. Patrick Bultinck

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300551

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Block party: The absolute configuration of 5-(3-bromophenyl)-4-hydroxy-5-methylhexan-2-one, an intermediate in the synthesis of various natural products, is assigned by using vibrational circular dichroism (VCD), electronic circular dichroism (ECD), and optical rotatory dispersion (ORD). These three techniques independently confirm that the absolute configuration is (S)-5-(3-bromophenyl)-4-hydroxy-5-methylhexan-2-one.

    6. Is FapyG Mutagenic?: Evidence from the DFT Study (pages 3263–3270)

      Prof. Nihar Ranjan Jena  and Prof. Phool Chand Mishra

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300535

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mismatched: 2,6-diamino-4-oxo-5-formamidopyrimidine (FapyG) can adopt three different isomeric conformations in DNA. Replicative DNA polymerases prefer to incorporate cytosine opposite FapyG, which suggests that FapyG retains the coding properties of guanine and, thus, would not be mutagenic in bacterial cells. The results obtained in mammalian cells regarding FapyG-induced guanine to thymine mutation can be understood when adenine is the incoming nucleotide.

    7. On the Addition of Aryl Radicals to Graphene: The Importance of Nonbonded Interactions (pages 3271–3277)

      Dr. Pablo A. Denis

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300533

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Getting into position: Dispersion-corrected density functional theory is utilized to study the addition of aryl radicals to perfect and defective graphene. The single vacancy shows the largest reactivity, followed by the zigzag edge, and the Stone–Wales defect site (see picture). Arylation is favored if the groups are attached nearby and on the same sublattice, particularly in the ortho and para positions.

    8. Gold/Wüstite Core–shell Nanoparticles: Suppression of Iron Oxidation through the Electron-Transfer Phenomenon (pages 3278–3283)

      Prerna Singh, Prof. Derrick M. Mott and Prof. Shinya Maenosono

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300471

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Golden iron: Gold/Wüstite core–shell nanoparticles are synthesized by utilizing the charge-transfer phenomenon that occurs from the gold core to the iron shell. Oxidation of the iron shell is partially suppressed by the electron transfer, and thus, a paramagnetic FeO phase, which is a reduced form of iron oxide, is predominantly formed in the shell.

    9. Comprehensive and Accurate Ab Initio Energy Surface of Simple Alanine Peptides (pages 3284–3293)

      Prof. Giuseppe Lanza and Prof. Maria A. Chiacchio

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300445

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Labyrinth of potential wells: Ab initio structural and energetic analyses of AcAlanNH2 (n=2–4) peptides show the existence of a myriad of stable structures, despite the shortness of the chain. These conformations are obtained by combining well-known 310-helix, fully extended (FE), polyproline II (PPII), and γ-turn structural elements of each residue in all possible ways. Mixed structures are transient states through which the folded=unfolded transitions occur.

    10. Onset of Chiral Adenine Surface Growth (pages 3294–3302)

      Dr. María Jose Capitán, Dr. Jesús Álvarez, Dr. Yang Wang, Dr. Roberto Otero, Dr. Manuel Alcamí, Prof. Fernando Martín and Prof. Rodolfo Miranda

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300321

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adenine growth: The structure of adenine crystals can be described as a pile-up of adenine planes. Each plane is formed by an aggregation of adenine dimers. The adenine plane growth starts with the formation of dimers that then join to form tetramers (through α2 hydrogen bonds; see figure). These dimers act as nucleation centers for the α-adenine plane growth.

    11. Anomalous Property of Ag(BO2)2 Hyperhalogen: Does Spin–Orbit Coupling Matter? (pages 3303–3308)

      Prof. Dr. Hui Chen, Xiang-Yu Kong, Prof. Dr. Weijun Zheng, Prof. Dr. Jiannian Yao, Prof. Dr. Anil K. Kandalam and Prof. Dr. Puru Jena

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300677

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spinning cups: High-level theoretical calculations and photoelectron spectroscopy experiments are systematically conducted to investigate a series of coinage-metal-containing hyperhalogen anions, Cu(BO2)2, Ag(BO2)2, and Au(BO2)2. The vertical electron detachment energy (VDE) of Ag(BO2)2 is anomalously higher than those of Au(BO2)2 and Cu(BO2)2, which is largely due to spin–orbit coupling.

    12. Computational Study of the One- and Two-Dimensional Infrared Spectra of a Proton-Transfer Mode in a Hydrogen-Bonded Complex Dissolved in a Polar Nanocluster (pages 3309–3318)

      Chia Shen Sow, Joseph Tomkins and Prof. Gabriel Hanna

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300610

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The size of it: Increasing the number of solvent molecules in a nanocluster containing a phenol–trimethylamine complex solvated by CH3Cl molecules initiates a transition from a cluster to a bulk-like state. The 1D and 2D IR spectra reflect this transition through pronounced changes in their peak intensities and numbers (see picture).

    13. Difference in the Photophysical Properties of a Perylenetetracarboxylic Diimide Dimer and a Hexamer Linked by the Same Hexaphenylbenzene Group (pages 3319–3326)

      Lin Xue, Yan Shi, Liangliang Zhang and Prof. Xiyou Li

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300602

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Interacting with Diimides: A perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PDI) dimer and a hexamer linked with the same hexaphenylbenzene group are prepared. Despite the similar relative orientation of the neighboring PDI units in these two compounds, stronger interactions among the PDI units within the hexamer are found. The excitation delocalization between the PDI subunits is faster in the hexamer than in the dimer.

    14. Level Anti-Crossings are a Key Factor for Understanding para-Hydrogen-Induced Hyperpolarization in SABRE Experiments (pages 3327–3331)

      Andrey N. Pravdivtsev, Prof. Alexandra V. Yurkovskaya, Prof. Hans-Martin Vieth, Dr. Konstantin L. Ivanov and Prof. Robert Kaptein

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300595

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      SABRE field dependence: Concept of nuclear spin level anti-crossings (LACs) explains the magnetic-field dependence of para-hydrogen-derived spin hyperpolarization in the signal amplification by using the reversible exchange (SABRE) method. Features in the SABRE field dependence can be identified with LACs, and LACs also provide simple rules for the polarization sign.

    15. Probing Rapidly-Ionizing Super-Atom Molecular Orbitals in C60: A Computational and Femtosecond Photoelectron Spectroscopy Study (pages 3332–3340)

      Benoît Mignolet, Dr. J. Olof Johansson, Prof. Eleanor E. B. Campbell and Prof. Françoise Remacle

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300585

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Super-atom molecular orbitals (SAMOs) in C60: SAMOs are diffuse hydrogen-like orbitals. SAMO excited states differ from the Rydberg states by the significant electronic density present inside the carbon cage. They photoionize on a femtosecond time scale, several orders of magnitude faster than non-SAMO states. The computed photoelectron spectra and angular distributions are in good agreement with the experimental results obtained by gas-phase photoelectron spectroscopy.

    16. Interplay between Metal⋅⋅⋅π Interactions and Hydrogen Bonds: Some Unusual Synergetic Effects of Coinage Metals and Substituents (pages 3341–3347)

      Dr. Meng Gao, Xin Yang, Prof. Dr. Jianbo Cheng, Qingzhong Li, Wenzuo Li and Prof. Dr. Robert E. Loffredo

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300558

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Playing together: Different synergetic effects are observed when hydrogen bonds and metal⋅⋅⋅π interactions coexist in the same complex. Additionally, strong electron-withdrawing groups induce unexpected effects.

    17. Ultrafast Photoinduced Electron Transfer in Viologen-Linked BODIPY Dyes (pages 3348–3354)

      Dr. Denis Frath, Dr. James E. Yarnell, Dr. Gilles Ulrich, Prof. Felix N. Castellano and Dr. Raymond Ziessel

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300547

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dip-dyed: New boron-dipyrromethene (BODIPY) dyes linked to viologen are prepared, and their photophysical and electrochemical properties are investigated. They exhibit well-defined redox behavior, highlighting the presence of BODIPY and viologen subunits. Transient absorption techniques demonstrate that photoinduced electron transfer is promoted, and the lifetime of the charge separated state depends on the substitution position.

    18. Self-Assembly Structures of 1H-Indazoles in the Solution and Solid Phases: A Vibrational (IR, FIR, Raman, and VCD) Spectroscopy and Computational Study (pages 3355–3360)

      Dr. J. R. Avilés Moreno, M. M. Quesada Moreno, Prof. J. J. López González, Prof. R. M. Claramunt, Prof. C. López, Prof. I. Alkorta and Prof. J. Elguero

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300503

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spontaneous chiral resolution: 1H-indazoles are good candidates for studying the molecular association and spontaneous resolution of chiral compounds. These compounds can crystallize as dimers, trimers, or catemers, depending on their structure and phase. Various vibrational spectroscopy techniques that are sensitive (VCD) and insensitive (IR, FIR, and Raman) towards the chirality are employed, together with quantum chemical calculations.

    19. Influence of the Metal Ion on the Two-Photon Absorption Properties of Lanthanide Complexes Including Near-IR Emitters (pages 3361–3367)

      Dr. Adrien Bourdolle, Dr. Mustapha Allali, Dr. Anthony D'Aléo, Dr. Patrice L. Baldeck, Dr. Kenji Kamada, Prof. J. A. Gareth Williams, Dr. Hubert Le Bozec, Dr. Chantal Andraud and Dr. Olivier Maury

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300501

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two-photon antenna effect or not? The two-photon absorption properties of Ln(TTA)3DEASbpy (TTA=2-thenoyltrifluoroacetonate, DEASbpy=diethylaminostyryl-2,2′-bipyridine) are investigated. The bipyridine ligand acts as a good antenna for the sensitization of near-infrared (NIR) emitters. YbIII luminescence can be sensitized by a two-photon antenna process, but this path is restricted in ErIII and completely prohibited in NdIII.

    20. Comparison of Force Fields on the Basis of Various Model Approaches—How To Design the Best Model for the [CnMIM][NTf2] Family of Ionic Liquids (pages 3368–3374)

      Dr. Thorsten Köddermann, Prof. Dirk Reith and Prof. Ralf Ludwig

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300486

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lower the force field! A test to determine how researchers can benefit from semiautomated optimization procedures if using parametrized classical force fields is performed. Two united-atom force fields for 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide [CnMIM][NTf2] (n=1, 2, 4, 6, 8) ionic liquids are developed that save simulation time and disk space. All simulated properties are in excellent agreement with the experimental values.

    21. Supramolecular Host-Inhibited Excited-State Proton Transfer and Fluorescence Switching of the Anti-Cancer Drug, Topotecan (pages 3375–3383)

      Krishna Gavvala, Abhigyan Sengupta, Raj Kumar Koninti and Dr. Partha Hazra

      Article first published online: 22 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300461

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Come on in: Inclusion complexation of the anticancer drug, topotecan (TPT), with cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) is studied by steady-state and picosecond time-resolved techniques. Inside the nanocavity of CB[7], excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) of TPT is inhibited and fluorescence switches from green to blue (see picture). If NaCl is introduced into the TPT-CB[7] solution, the blue color switches back to green.

    22. Enhancing the Deperoxidation Activity of Cobalt(II)Acetylacetonate by the Addition of Octanoic Acid (pages 3384–3388)

      Eyal Spier and Prof. Dr. Ive Hermans

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300460

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Kinetic bOAst: The catalytic cycle by which Co(acac)2 decomposes alkyl hydroperoxide can be tuned by the addition of octanoic acid (OA). Coordination of OA stabilizes the Co[BOND]OOR bond and prevents unimolecular scission. As such, the CoOOR species are forced to enter an alternative catalytic cycle, which results in a higher pre-exponential rate factor, over-compensating the higher barrier of the new rate-determining step.

    23. Solvation Dynamics of a Radical Ion Pair in Micro-Heterogeneous Binary Solvents: A Semi-Quantitative Study Utilizing MARY Line-Broadening Experiments (pages 3389–3399)

      Dr. Kunal Pal, Dr. Günter Grampp and Dr. Daniel R. Kattnig

      Article first published online: 12 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300435

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mary-go-round: The unusual solvation state of a radical ion pair (RIP) in micro-heterogeneous binary solvent mixtures is probed by magnetically affected reaction yield (MARY) line-broadening experiments and theoretical modeling. The picture shows the relative accumulation of the polar solvent component around the RIP for different compositions.

    24. Torsional Dynamics of Thioflavin T in Room-Temperature Ionic Liquids: An Effect of Heterogeneity of the Medium (pages 3400–3409)

      Aninda Chatterjee, Banibrata Maity and Dr. Debabrata Seth

      Article first published online: 9 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300433

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Free to move! The photophysics of a fibril-binding dye, thioflavin T (ThT), is studied in two room-temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([BmPr][NTf2]) and methyltrioctylammonium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ([N1888][NTf2]). The effect of structural heterogeneity present in the neat RTILs on the emission properties of ThT can be observed (see figure).

    25. Number Density of Liquid Inclusions Formed in Frozen Aqueous Electrolyte (pages 3410–3416)

      Takuya Hashimoto, Dr. Makoto Harada, Prof. Shuichi Nojima and Prof. Tetsuo Okada

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300380

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      As cold as ice: The number density of liquid inclusions formed in salt-doped ice is independent of the concentration and type of the salt. Isolated liquid inclusions of a uniform size are formed when the temperature of a frozen electrolyte increases past the eutectic point; however, the number density of liquid inclusions is almost constant and independent of these experimental parameters, particularly when an electrolyte is frozen in liquid nitrogen.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION