ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 15

October 21, 2013

Volume 14, Issue 15

Pages 3421–3627

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Real-time Amyloid Aggregation Monitoring with a Photonic Crystal-based Approach (ChemPhysChem 15/2013) (page 3421)

      Sara Santi, Dr. Valeria Musi, Dr. Emiliano Descrovi, Dr. Vincent Paeder, Joab Di Francesco, Dr. Lubos Hvozdara, Dr. Peter van der Wal, Prof. Hilal A. Lashuel, Prof. Annalisa Pastore, Prof. Reinhard Neier and Prof. Hans Peter Herzig

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Felix Bloch meets Alois Alzheimer: On p. 3476 R. Neier and H. P. Herzig et al. employ an optical label-free refractometric sensing platform, based on Bloch surface waves, to monitor in real time the early events of the amyloid-beta 1–42 peptide aggregation, which is related to the onset of the aberrant neurodegenerative Alzheimer's disease.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Structural and Magnetic Properties of 3d Transition-Metal-Atom Adsorption on Perfect and Defective Graphene: A Density Functional Theory Study (ChemPhysChem 15/2013) (page 3422)

      Dr. Tingting Zhang, Dr. Liyan Zhu, Dr. Shijun Yuan and Prof. Dr. Jinlan Wang

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the presence of topological defects, the interaction between 3d transition metal atoms and graphene are greatly enhanced. How the magnetic properties can be tuned by topological defects is shown on on p. 3483 by J. Wang and co-workers.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPhysChem 15/2013 (pages 3423–3431)

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390073

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. Editors' Selection: ChemPhysChem 15/2013 (page 3432)

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390074

  4. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. Oxyluciferin Photoacidity: The Missing Element for Solving the Keto–Enol Mystery? (pages 3441–3446)

      Dr. Luís Pinto da Silva, Dr. Ron Simkovitch, Prof. Dr. Dan Huppert and Prof. Dr. Joaquim C. G. Esteves da Silva

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300402

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Keto–enol enigma rekindled! The oxyluciferin family of fluorophores is found to be photoacidic and of being able to transfer protons in the excited state. Moreover, photoinduced keto–enol-tautomeric reactions are found (see picture). These findings rekindle the possibility of enol-based firefly bioluminescence.

  5. Concept

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. Rolling up a Graphene Sheet (pages 3447–3453)

      Dr. Matteo Calvaresi, Prof. Mildred Quintana, Prof. Petra Rudolf, Prof. Francesco Zerbetto and Prof. Maurizio Prato

      Article first published online: 11 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300337

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rolling, rolling, rolling, rawhide!!! Graphene ribbons are produced, rolled up and sealed to form multi-walled nanotubes.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. Pharmaceutically Active Ionic Liquid Self-Assembled Vesicles for the Application as an Efficient Drug Delivery System (pages 3454–3457)

      Longlong Zhang, Jing Liu, Tingting Tian, Ya Gao, Xiaoqing Ji, Prof. Zhonghao Li and Dr. Yuxia Luan

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300509

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shuttle-drug: Self-assembled vesicles of a pharmaceutically active ionic liquid are shown to be an efficient drug delivery system, which realizes the controlled release of its pharmaceutically active component directly.

    2. Binding of a Positron to Nucleic Base Molecules and Their Pairs (pages 3458–3462)

      Katsuhiko Koyanagi, Prof. Yukiumi Kita, Prof. Yasuteru Shigeta and Prof. Masanori Tachikawa

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300549

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hole attack: A theoretical one-electron oxidation of nucleic base molecules and their pairs by positron is proposed, based on the calculations for positron-attached neutral forms of species, adenine (A), thymine (T), guanine (G), cytosine (C), and their Watson–Crick base pairs (A–T and G–C). The results reveal that binding of a positron to neutral isolated nucleic base molecules is base-selective.

    3. Metal-Functionalized Silicene for Efficient Hydrogen Storage (pages 3463–3466)

      Tanveer Hussain, Dr. Sudip Chakraborty and Prof. Dr. Rajeev Ahuja

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300548

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hoovering up hydrogen: A systematic density functional theory investigation shows alkali-metal doped silicene to be a promising hydrogen-storage material. The preferential sites of the dopants, stabilities of the doped systems, the bonding mechanism, and the hydrogen storage capacities are calculated by using a variety of computational methods including the projector augmented wave method, the Perdew–Burke–Ernzerhof variant of the generalized gradient approximation, the Nosé–Hoover thermostat, and Bader charge analysis.

    4. Dye Sublimation as a Measure of Accumulated Heat Exposure (pages 3467–3471)

      Xiaoju Shi, Xiaofang Ying and Prof. Dr. Zongwu Deng

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300517

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Heat history monitor: Combination of the sublimation and adsorption processes of specific dyes can be used as a measure of accumulated heat exposure. Mass transfer from the sublimation layer to the adsorption layer strongly depends on temperature and results in a gradual color change in the adsorption layer. The total color change reflects the accumulated heat exposure.

    5. Surface-Induced Dechlorination of FeOEP[BOND]Cl on Cu(111) (pages 3472–3475)

      Dennis van Vörden, Manfred Lange, Johannes Schaffert, Maren C. Cottin, Merlin Schmuck, Dr. Roberto Robles, Prof. Dr. Heiko Wende, Dr. Christian A. Bobisch and Prof. Dr. Rolf Möller

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300497

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      To be or not to be chlorinated: When octaethylporphyrin iron(III) chloride (FeOEP[BOND]Cl) molecules are sublimated onto Cu(111) surfaces, two different molecular species are observed through scanning tunneling microscopy, showing either a protrusion or a depression at the center. In combination with van der Waals-corrected density functional calculations, our experiments reveal that one species corresponds to FeOEP[BOND]Cl molecules with the chlorine atom pointing away from the surface, whereas the other species has been dechlorinated.

  7. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. Real-time Amyloid Aggregation Monitoring with a Photonic Crystal-based Approach (pages 3476–3482)

      Sara Santi, Dr. Valeria Musi, Dr. Emiliano Descrovi, Dr. Vincent Paeder, Joab Di Francesco, Dr. Lubos Hvozdara, Dr. Peter van der Wal, Prof. Hilal A. Lashuel, Prof. Annalisa Pastore, Prof. Reinhard Neier and Prof. Hans Peter Herzig

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300633

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catching the wave: A Bloch surface wave (BSW) is generated at the interface between a dielectric multilayer structure and a solution containing the Aβ(1-42) peptide. The BSW is sensitive to the variation of the refractive index (Δn) of the solution. This variation is related to conformational changes of the Aβ(1-42) peptide during aggregation, that is, the transition from an initial soluble form to a non-soluble fibrillar state (see figure).

    2. Structural and Magnetic Properties of 3d Transition-Metal-Atom Adsorption on Perfect and Defective Graphene: A Density Functional Theory Study (pages 3483–3488)

      Dr. Tingting Zhang, Dr. Liyan Zhu, Dr. Shijun Yuan and Prof. Dr. Jinlan Wang

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300563

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Seeking imperfection: In presence of topological defects, the binding energies (BEs) of 3d transition-metal (TM) atoms on graphene (perfect graphene (G6) or defective graphene with a single pentagon (G5), a single heptagon (G7), or a pentagon–heptagon pair (G57); see picture] are greatly enhanced. Their magnetic properties can also be diversely tuned by topological defects.

    3. Straightforward Oxidation of a Copper Substrate Produces an Underwater Superoleophobic Mesh for Oil/Water Separation (pages 3489–3494)

      Na Liu, Yuning Chen, Fei Lu, Yingze Cao, Zhongxin Xue, Kan Li, Prof. Lin Feng and Prof. Yen Wei

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300691

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oily mesh: A superhydrophilic and underwater superoleophobic Cu(OH)2-covered mesh with micro- and nanoscale hierarchical composite structures is successfully fabricated through a one-step chemical oxidation of a smooth copper mesh. Without any further modification, the as-prepared mesh can selectively separate water from oil/water mixtures with high separation efficiency and excellent stability (see picture).

    4. Manganese-Induced Triplet Blinking and Photobleaching of Single Molecule Cyanine Dyes (pages 3495–3502)

      Monika A. Ciuba and Prof. Dr. Marcia Levitus

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300634

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Triplet blinking: Controlling the triplet-state quantum yield, lifetime, and deactivation pathways of organic dyes is of great interest in single-molecule spectroscopy and super-resolution imaging. Triplet states play a central role in the photobleaching and blinking properties of fluorescent dyes. In this work, the paramagnetic ion Mn2+ is found to induce intersystem crossing to the triplet state in Cy3, Cy3B and Cy5, which results in increased photobleaching and triplet blinking.

    5. Synthesis and Properties of Alkoxy- and Alkenyl-Substituted Peralkylated Imidazolium Ionic Liquids (pages 3503–3516)

      Cedric Maton, Dr. Neil R. Brooks, Prof. Dr. Luc Van Meervelt, Prof. Dr. Koen Binnemans, Dr. Stijn Schaltin, Prof. Dr. Jan Fransaer and Prof. Dr. Christian V. Stevens

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Im melting! A library of fully substituted imidazolium ionic liquids is synthesized. The cations are provided with alkenyl or alkoxy moieties. The alkenyl-substituted analogues with low symmetry undercool very well, whereas the alkoxy-substituted compounds are readily crystallizable but have lower viscosities. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis shows a relationship between the intermolecular interactions and the melting points of the solid compounds.

    6. New Anthracene Derivatives as Triplet Acceptors for Efficient Green-to-Blue Low-Power Upconversion (pages 3517–3522)

      Dr. Zuo-Qin Liang, Bin Sun, Dr. Chang-Qing Ye, Prof. Xiao-Mei Wang, Prof. Xu-Tang Tao, Prof. Qin-Hua Wang, Ping Ding, Bao Wang and Jing-Jing Wang

      Article first published online: 11 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300571

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three against three: Organic acceptors are used for triplet–triplet-annihilation upconversion and upconversion quantum yields of up to 17.4 % are observed. The efficient triplet–triplet-annihilation upconversion is attributed to an efficient quenching of the sensitizer triplet and the high fluorescence quantum yields.

    7. Selective Adsorption of Functionalized Nanoparticles to Patterned Polymer Brush Surfaces and Its Probing with an Optical Trap (pages 3523–3531)

      Annina Steinbach, Dr. Tobias Paust, Dr. Manuela Pluntke, Prof. Dr. Othmar Marti and Prof. Dr. Dirk Volkmer

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300516

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A brush with particles: Selective adhesion of polymeric phosphonate nanoparticles onto micropatterned substrates is directed by modifying surfaces with polymer brush films (see figure). Choice of functional groups for the polymer brushes allows tailoring of nanoparticle–surface interactions. The optical trap method is extended to measure the small forces of interacting surfaces, thereby elucidating the mechanisms of this self-assembling system.

    8. Superfluorescent Squaraine with Efficient Two-Photon Absorption and High Photostability (pages 3532–3542)

      Prof. Kevin D. Belfield, Dr. Mykhailo V. Bondar, Hafeez S. Haniff, Dr. Ivan A. Mikhailov, Dr. Gheorghe Luchita and Dr. Olga V. Przhonska

      Article first published online: 10 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300447

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Super fluoro to the rescue! Large two-photon absorption (2PA), femtosecond transient absorption kinetics, and efficient superfluorescence properties of a new symmetrical squaraine derivative (1) are reported along with extremely high photochemical stability. The density functional theory (DFT)-based quantum chemical study of 1 reveals the vibronic nature of the 2PA spectra in the main linear absorption band that is in good agreement with experimental data.

    9. Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters in Condensed DNA (pages 3543–3550)

      Ivan L. Volkov, Ruslan R. Ramazanov, Dr. Evgeniy V. Ubyivovk, Valerij I. Rolich, Dr. Alexei I. Kononov and Prof. Dr. Nina A. Kasyanenko

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300673

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Towards chemically stable silver nanoclusters: fluorescent DNA-shelled silver nanoclusters with enhanced stability are reported (see picture).

    10. O2 Binding to Heme is Strongly Facilitated by Near-Degeneracy of Electronic States (pages 3551–3558)

      Prof. Dr. Kasper P. Kepp

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300658

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crossing borders: The paper reports how close-lying spin states and resulting broad crossing regions enable fast, reversible oxygen binding to heme (see picture), despite the small spin–orbit coupling of this biologically important spin-forbidden process.

    11. How do Pseudoenantiomers Structurally Differ in the Gas Phase? An IR/UV Spectroscopy Study of Jet-Cooled Hydroquinine and Hydroquinidine (pages 3559–3568)

      Dr. Ananya Sen, Dr. Valeria Lepere, Dr. Katia Le Barbu-Debus and Prof. Dr. Anne Zehnacker

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300643

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Pseudoenantiomers: identical twins? Laser-induced fluorescence and double-resonance vibrational spectroscopy of jet-cooled cinchona alkaloids, namely hydroquinine and hydroquinidine, show that pseudoenantiomers are structurally very similar. However, these experiments, coupled with ab initio calculations, emphasize the role of the exocyclic substituent in differentiating them from real enantiomers.

    12. Formation Mechanism of a Silane-PVA/PVAc Complex Film on a Glass Fiber Surface (pages 3569–3580)

      Dr. Daniel Repovsky, Eduard Jane, Dr. Tibor Palszegi, Marek Slobodnik and Dr. Dusan Velic

      Article first published online: 29 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300608

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      PVA Glue! Complex film formation of a silane film and PVA/PVAc (polyvinylalcohol/polyvinylacetate) microspheres on a glass fiber surface is determined at 1) the nanoscale by using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and 2) the macroscale by using the zeta potential. The silane film penetrates in a honeycomb fashion from the glass surface through the PVA/PVAc microspheres; this forms a hexagonal close-pack structure.

    13. A Potential Carcinogenic Pyrene Derivative under Förster Resonance Energy Transfer to Various Energy Acceptors in Nanoscopic Environments (pages 3581–3593)

      Soma Banerjee, Nirmal Goswami and Dr. Samir Kumar Pal

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300568

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Don't FRET about it: Picosecond-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from various vibronic bands in benzo[a]pyrene (BP) shows a strong dependency on the spectral overlap of the corresponding vibronic bands with the absorption spectrum of an energy acceptor [e.g. ethidium (Et)] in a confined environment.

    14. Optimization of Reaction Conditions towards Multiple Types of Framework Isomers and Periodic-Increased Porosity: Luminescence Properties and Selective CO2 Adsorption over N2 (pages 3594–3599)

      Xiao-Liu Wu, Prof. Dr. Feng Luo, Dr. Gong-Ming Sun, Prof. Dr. An-Min Zheng, Prof. Dr. Jian Zhang, Prof. Dr. Ming-Biao Luo, Prof. Dr. Wen-Yuan Xu, Yan Zhu, Xiao-Min Zhang and Shu-Yun Huang

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300564

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Taking the temperature: Three different framework isomers of a metal-organic framework (MOF) are synthesized by solvo(hydro)thermolysis changing but the temperature . The reaction conditions for this system are explored by experimental methods and interpreted by theoretic research. The resultant MOF porosity shows high selectivity for CO2 over N2 adsorption.

    15. Isolation and Enrichment of Pathogens with a Surface-Modified Aluminium Chip for Raman Spectroscopic Applications (pages 3600–3605)

      Susanne Pahlow, Sandra Kloß, Dr. Verena Blättel, Konstantin Kirsch, Dr. Uwe Hübner, Dr. Dana Cialla, Dr. Petra Rösch, Dr. Karina Weber and Prof. Dr. Jürgen Popp

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300543

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Casting for bacteria: A Raman-compatible chip for isolating microorganisms from complex media is presented. The bacteria are enriched on the chip (see picture) by using antibodies against analogue cell wall surface structures of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria as capture molecules. Raman measurements of single bacteria cells can be performed directly on the chip surface. Subsequent identification is achieved by comparing the single cell spectra to a database.

    16. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Structural Characterization of Alumina-Supported Rh Catalysts: Effects of Ceriation and Zirconiation by using Metal–Organic Precursors (pages 3606–3617)

      Dr. Anna B. Kroner, Dr. Mark A. Newton, Prof. Dr. Moniek Tromp, Prof. Andrea E. Russell, Prof. Andrew J. Dent and Prof. John Evans

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300537

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Islands in the stream: By using β-ketonate complexes as precursors, Rh/γ-alumina catalysts are prepared by using two methods. The rhodium catalysts are formed with Ce and Zr oxide islands on the alumina surface, which are in close association with the rhodium metal particles. These islands act to largely protect the rhodium nanoparticles from oxidation.

    17. Calibration of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy Binding Energy Scale for the Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts: Is Everything Really under Control? (pages 3618–3626)

      Dr. Marc Jacquemin, Michel J. Genet, Prof. Eric M. Gaigneaux and Dr. Damien P. Debecker

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300411

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Taking control: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of heterogeneous catalysts usually relies on binding energy scale calibration by using the C 1s peak as an internal standard. The inorganic solid can, however, have a marked impact on the photoelectron emitted from the adventitious carbon, and this creates an important calibration bias that must be taken into account and corrected for proper use of XPS data.

  8. Book Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. News
    5. Minireview
    6. Concept
    7. Communications
    8. Articles
    9. Book Review
    1. The Physical Chemist′s Toolbox. by Robert M. Metzger (page 3627)

      Prof. Nikolay O. Mchedlov-Petrossyan

      Article first published online: 3 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300660

      John Wiley & Sons 2012, 960 pp., hardcover, € 142.00—ISBN 978-0-470-88925-1

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION