ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 3

February 25, 2013

Volume 14, Issue 3

Pages 453–626

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Surface-Tension-Confined Microfluidics and Their Applications (ChemPhysChem 3/2013) (page 453)

      Inseong You, Nayeon Yun and Prof. Haeshin Lee

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390010

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      Surface-tension-confined microfluidics (STCM) has become a rapidly emerging research area. STCM utilizes surface tension (i.e. energy) to control movement of streams or droplets of liquid. Thus, STCM typically operates on a 2D platform rather than in 3D. This evolution of microfulidics from 3D to 2D platforms opens new opportunities in applications as well as the physical chemistry of surfaces, as reviewed by H. Lee et al. on p. 471.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: 3D Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of the Distribution of Aluminum Coordination Environments in Zeolites with Soft X-Ray Microscopy (ChemPhysChem 3/2013) (page 454)

      Luis R. Aramburo, Dr. Yijin Liu, Dr. Tolek Tyliszczak, Prof. Dr. Frank M. F. de Groot, Prof. Dr. Joy C. Andrews and Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390011

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      Soft X-ray nanotomography provides new insight in the distribution and coordination environment of aluminum within zeolite aggregates at the individual particle level, as shown by B. M. Weckhuysen et al. on p. 496.

  2. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemPhysChem 3/2013 (pages 455–462)

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390012

  3. Editors' Selection

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Editors' Selection: ChemPhysChem 3/2013 (page 463)

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390013

  4. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemPhysChem 3/2013 (pages 466–469)

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201390014

  5. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Surface-Tension-Confined Microfluidics and Their Applications (pages 471–481)

      Inseong You, Nayeon Yun and Prof. Haeshin Lee

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200929

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      Showing the way: Emerging microfluidic systems called surface-tension-confined microfluidic (STCM) devices are reviewed. STCM devices utilize surface energy that can control the movement of fluid droplets. Unlike conventional microfluidics, which confine the movement of fluids by three-dimensional microchannels, STCM systems provide two-dimensional platforms for microfluidics.

  6. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Discovery of the Heaviest Elements (pages 483–489)

      Dr. Fritz P. Heßberger

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201201011

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      Still haven′t (quite) found what I′m looking for: The search for new superheavy elements is at present one of the most exciting adventures in nuclear physics. Thanks to enhanced experimental techniques, the synthesis of elements Z=113 to 118 in reactions using 48Ca projectiles and targets made of isotopes of the elements neptunium to californium has been claimed.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Ionic Liquid-Controlled Excited-State Behavior of Naphthols (pages 491–495)

      Vinod Kumar and Prof. Siddharth Pandey

      Article first published online: 15 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200956

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      No fluorescence emission of the naphtholate anion is observed from ionic liquids with an imidazolium cation containing a C2 hydrogen (C2[BOND]H). This is attributed to the formation of a “dark” complex between the imidazolium cation and the excited naphtholate anion.

    2. 3D Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of the Distribution of Aluminum Coordination Environments in Zeolites with Soft X-Ray Microscopy (pages 496–499)

      Luis R. Aramburo, Dr. Yijin Liu, Dr. Tolek Tyliszczak, Prof. Dr. Frank M. F. de Groot, Prof. Dr. Joy C. Andrews and Prof. Dr. Bert M. Weckhuysen

      Article first published online: 4 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201201015

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      Which side are you on? Scanning transmission X-ray microscopy is used for the first time to elucidate the coordination and distribution of aluminum in industrial-relevant zeolites at the single-particle level. Extended regions of a few hundred nanometers, rich in higher aluminum coordination environments, are heterogeneously embedded within the zeolite particle, before and after a steaming post-treatment.

    3. A Design Strategy for Motion Control Systems with Identical Binding Sites (pages 500–504)

      Wei-Tao Peng, Dr. Yu-Chang Chang and Prof. Ito Chao

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201300001

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      Molecular motion control systems such as bistable rotaxanes or molecular elevators are mostly designed with different binding sites. In this theoretical study, it is demonstrated that, with the use of a redox reaction center and its position effect, it is possible to build a motion control system with identical binding sites.

  8. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Graphical Abstract
    4. Editors' Selection
    5. News
    6. Minireview
    7. Essay
    8. Communications
    9. Articles
    1. Nanocavity-Based Determination of Absolute Values of Photoluminescence Quantum Yields (pages 505–513)

      Dr. Alexey I. Chizhik, Dr. Ingo Gregor, Benedikt Ernst and Prof. Dr. Jörg Enderlein

      Article first published online: 18 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200931

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      In a new light: A new method for determining absolute values of quantum yield of luminescent emitters, based on the modification of the radiative transition of emitters within a tunable metallic nanocavity is presented. The method is easy to set up and works without any calibration. It will thus be useful for all applications where absolute and calibration-free measurements of luminescence quantum yields are needed.

    2. Enhanced Oxygen Reduction Reactions in Fuel Cells on H-Decorated and B-Substituted Graphene (pages 514–519)

      Dr. Xiangkai Kong, Prof. Dr. Qianwang Chen and Zhiyuan Sun

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200918

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      The right stuff: H-decorated and B-substituted graphene are good catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. P-doped graphene is not quite as effective, but still better than undoped or defect graphene.

    3. Mechanism of Framework Oxygen Exchange in Fe-Zeolites: A Combined DFT and Mass Spectrometry Study (pages 520–531)

      Dr. Prokopis C. Andrikopoulos, Dr. Zdenek Sobalik, Dr. Jana Novakova, Dr. Petr Sazama and Dr. Stepan Sklenak

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200900

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      The role of framework oxygen atoms 16OFR in N218O decomposition over Fe-ferrierite is investigated employing a combined experimental and theoretical (periodic density functional theory calculations) approach.

    4. Modulation of Photophysics and pKa Shift of the Anti-cancer Drug Camptothecin in the Nanocavities of Supramolecular Hosts (pages 532–542)

      Krishna Gavvala, Abhigyan Sengupta and Dr. Partha Hazra

      Article first published online: 7 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200879

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      All inclusive: Cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) assists the pKa shift of an anti-cancer drug, 20(S)-camptothecin (CPT), by forming a 2:1 (CB7CPT) inclusion complex (see picture). However, protonation does not take place when it is encased in a β-cyclodextrin cavity. Docking and semi-empirical quantum calculations offer insight into the molecular orientation of CPT in the inclusion complexes.

    5. Nanoadhesion on Rigid Methyl-Terminated Biphenyl Thiol Monolayers: A High-Rate Dynamic Force Spectroscopy Study (pages 543–549)

      Dr. Hubert Gojzewski, Dr. Michael Kappl, Gunnar Kircher, Dr. Wojciech Koczorowski, Prof. Dr. Hans-Jürgen Butt and Dr. Arkadiusz Ptak

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200877

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      Dynamic force spectroscopy in the extended loading-rate range is applied to measure nanoadhesion on a rigid thiol-based monolayer (see picture). The humidity is also varied. The results are compared with data for a flexible alkane thiol monolayer. The termination of the thiol molecules is the main factor that influences the adhesion interactions.

    6. Raman Spectroscopic Imaging for the Real-Time Detection of Chemical Changes Associated with Docetaxel Exposure (pages 550–553)

      Katharina Bräutigam, Dr. Thomas Bocklitz, Prof. Dr. Michael Schmitt, Dr. Petra Rösch and Prof. Dr. Jürgen Popp

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200800

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      Towards personalized therapy: Raman microspectroscopy and modern chemometric approaches are combined to monitor the impact of docetaxel—a well-established chemotherapy drug—on the morphology and biochemistry of single living cancer cells at different treatment times (see picture).

    7. Sensitive, Fast, Solution-Processed Ultraviolet Detectors Based on Passivated Zinc Oxide Nanorods (pages 554–559)

      Prof. Dr. Ali Rostami, Dr. Mahboubeh Dolatyari, Elham Amini, Dr. Hassan Rasooli, Dr. Hamed Baghban and Somayeh Miri

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200660

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      If the cap fits: The effect of capping molecules on the detectivity of UV detectors based on unpassivated and passivated ZnO nanorods is examined. Specific chemical species introduced onto the surfaces (see picture) produce desired trap states with a selected lifetime. The devices have higher photoresponses and faster response times in the UV region than those based on ZnO nanoparticles.

    8. Photoelectrochemical Scanning Droplet Cell Microscopy (PE-SDCM) (pages 560–567)

      Jan Philipp Kollender, Dr. Andrei Ionut Mardare and Prof. Dr. Achim Walter Hassel

      Article first published online: 16 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200656

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      Spot the drop: Principles of localised photoelectrochemistry are summarised and an experimental approach, the photoelectrochemical scanning droplet cell microscopy (PE-SDCM, see picture), is described which allows the performance of the most important photoelectrochemical experiments within a diameter of 100 μm. Its general applicability is demonstrated by investigating n- and p-doped Si.

    9. Complexation of C60 Fullerene with Aromatic Drugs (pages 568–578)

      Prof. Dr. Maxim P. Evstigneev, Anatoly S. Buchelnikov, Dmitry P. Voronin, Dr. Yuriy V. Rubin, Dr. Leonid F. Belous, Prof. Dr. Yuriy I. Prylutskyy and Dr. Uwe Ritter

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200938

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      A complex matter: The contributions of various physical factors to the energetics of complexation of C60 fullerene molecules with aromatic drugs are investigated.

    10. Understanding the Electronic Structures of Graphene Quantum Dot Physisorption and Chemisorption onto the TiO2 (110) Surface: A First-Principles Calculation (pages 579–582)

      Dr. Run Long

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200882

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      Instant chemistry: The interfacial electronic structure and charge transfer properties of graphene quantum dot (GQD) physisorption and chemisorption on the TiO2 (110) surface from density functional theory calculations is presented (see picture). The results obtained imply that chemisorbed GQDs produce a composite with better photocatalytic and photovoltaic performance than composites formed through physisorption.

    11. Model for Conformational Relaxation of Flexible Conjugated Polymers: Application to p-Phenylenevinylene Trimers in Nonpolar Solvents (pages 583–590)

      Dr. Adelino M. Galvão, Dr. Roberto E. Di Paolo, Prof. António L. Maçanita and Prof. K. Razi Naqvi

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200869

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      Conjugated polymers: A mechanochemical model is used to rationalize the kinetics of conformational relaxation of PPV oligomers.

    12. Biomolecule-Assisted Construction of Cadmium Sulfide Hollow Spheres with Structure-Dependent Photocatalytic Activity (pages 591–596)

      Chengzhen Wei, Wenzhe Zang, Jingzhou Yin, Prof. Qingyi Lu, Qun Chen, Rongmei Liu and Feng Gao

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200862

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      Not-so-sleepy hollow: Monodispersive solid and hollow CdS spheres with structure-dependent photocatalytic abilities for the photodegradation of dyes are constructed with the assistance of the soulcarboxymthyi chitosan biopolymer under hydrothermal conditions.

    13. Low-Temperature Sol-Gel Synthesis of Nanostructured Polymer/Titania Hybrid Films based on Custom-Made Poly(3-Alkoxy Thiophene) (pages 597–602)

      Martin A. Niedermeier, Monika Rawolle, Dr. Philipp Lellig, Dr. Volker Körstgens, Dr. Eva M. Herzig, Dr. Adeline Buffet, Dr. Stephan V. Roth, Prof. Jochen S. Gutmann, Thomas Fröschl, Prof. Nicola Hüsing and Prof. Peter Müller-Buschbaum

      Article first published online: 10 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200808

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      Well (em)bedded: A low-temperature route towards the direct fabrication of a nanostructured hybrid polymer/titania film is presented. Customized poly(alkoxy thiophene) is synthesized and employed in a sol-gel process in which it acts as the structure-directing agent. The use of a pH-controlled precursor leads to a crystalline titania network which is embedded in the polymer matrix as probed with grazing incidence wide-angle scattering (see picture) and atomic force microscopy.

    14. The Charging of Micellar Nanoparticles in Electrospray Ionization (pages 603–609)

      Dr. Tristan Doussineau, Marion Santacreu, Dr. Rodolphe Antoine, Dr. Philippe Dugourd, Wenjing Zhang, Isabelle Chaduc, Dr. Muriel Lansalot, Dr. Franck D'Agosto and Prof. Bernadette Charleux

      Article first published online: 11 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200777

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      Looking for Rayleigh: The charging of amphiphilic block copolymer nanoparticles from ∼65 nm to ∼150 nm in diameter through electrospray is analyzed by charge detection spectrometry (see picture). The present study improves the overall understanding of the electrospray process.

    15. Theoretical Study on the Rectifying Performance of Organoimido Derivatives of Hexamolybdates (pages 610–617)

      Dr. Shizheng Wen, Dr. Guochun Yang, Prof. Likai Yan, Haibin Li and Prof. Zhongmin Su

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200770

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      A new type of molecular diode based on the organoimido derivatives of hexamolybdates is investigated using the first-principles method. A high and robust rectification ratio is obtained for these organic–inorganic hybrid systems.

    16. Formation and Properties of a Hybrid Organosilica with a p-Phenylene Vinylene Polymer Partially Grafted to the Walls (pages 618–626)

      Dr. Mireia Buaki-Sogo, Dr. Maykel de Miguel, Dr. Pedro Atienzar, Prof. Mercedes Álvaro and Prof. Hermenegildo García

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.201200763

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      Hard graft: A mesoporous organosilica (mpSiO2) containing a p-phenylene vinylene (PPV) co-polymer partially grafted to the walls of the hybrid material (PPVequation imagempSiO2) is reported. Laser flash photolysis studies of PPVequation imagempSiO2 indicate that this material can form PPV.+ polarons that could be responsible for the electrochemical and electroluminescent response (see picture).

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