ChemPhysChem

Cover image for Vol. 7 Issue 7

July 10, 2006

Volume 7, Issue 7

Pages 1393–1602

    1. Cover Picture: Monitoring Protein Interactions in the Living Cell Through the Fluorescence Decays of the Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ChemPhysChem 7/2006) (page 1393)

      Regis Grailhe, Fabienne Merola, Jacqueline Ridard, Stephen Couvignou, Chantal Le Poupon, Jean-Pierre Changeux and Helene Laguitton-Pasquier

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200690022

      The cover picture shows how the fluorescence decays of the cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) can reveal molecular interactions and organisation in the living cell. Förster resonant energy transfer (FRET) towards its acceptor, the yellow fluorescent protein (YFP), leads to charateristic decreases in the CFP fluorescence lifetimes. Despite the very high intracellular protein concentrations achieved, leading to strong molecular proximity, the results show that CFP and YFP fail to form inside the cell the dimer, previously observed for purified green fluorescent proteins. Find out more in the Article by Grailhe et al. on page 1442.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Passion for Precision (Nobel Lecture) (page 1402)

      Theodor W. Hänsch

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200690024

      This article corrects:

      Passion for Precision (Nobel Lecture)1

      Vol. 7, Issue 6, 1170–1187, Article first published online: 25 APR 2006

    3. Twisting Nanotubes: From Torsion to Chirality (pages 1405–1407)

      Ernesto Joselevich

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600206

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let's twist again! Torsion is a chiral deformation. It can turn achiral objects into chiral ones, and discriminate between left-handed and right-handed chiral objects. This article focuses on the significance of carbon nanotubes which can be elastically twisted by 180° without breaking and act as a single-molecule torsional pendulum (see transmission electron micrograph).

    4. The Catalytic Nanodiode: Detecting Continous Electron Flow at Oxide–Metal Interfaces Generated by a Gas-Phase Exothermic Reaction (pages 1409–1413)

      Jeong Young Park and Gabor A. Somorjai

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600056

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalytic nanodiode: Exothermic catalytic reactions induce electronic excitation at the metal surface, leading to the production of energetic hot electrons. The continuous flow of hot electrons was detected over several hours using a Pt/TiO2 catalytic nanodiode (see figure), during the platinum-catalyzed oxidation of carbon monoxide.

    5. Ionic Liquids—Revolutionary Potential for Chemistry? (pages 1415–1416)

      Ralf Ludwig

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600230

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Research into ionic liquids is still at an early stage and many of their properties remain to be elucidated. The 92nd Bunsen-Colloquium “Physical Chemistry in Ionic Liquids”, held at the Technische Universität Clausthal (Germany), had the aim to summarise the state of the art in physical, theoretical (see snapshot of the ionic liquid [C2MIM][NTf2]) and technical chemistry as well as to make these fascinating and promising liquids more popular in physical chemistry.

    6. Electrostatic-Field-Induced Enhancement of Gas Mixture Separation in Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Computational Study (pages 1417–1421)

      Qingyuan Yang and Chongli Zhong

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600191

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ordered microdomains with different electrostatic field strengths exist in certain metal-organic frameworks (MOFs; see picture), and the electrostatic interactions in MOFs can enhance the separation of some gas mixtures, demonstrating that MOFs have great potential for adsorption separations.

    7. How Reaction Kinetics with Time-Dependent Rate Coefficients Differs from Generalized Mass Action (pages 1422–1424)

      Ramon Grima and Santiago Schnell

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600081

      Take caution! The two distinct theoretical descriptions of non-classical kinetics: fractal-like kinetics (kinetics with time-dependent rate coefficients) and the power law approximation (generalized mass action kinetics) are shown to be equivalent only for simple reactions of the type A+A[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]ø or A+B[RIGHTWARDS ARROW]ø with equal initial concentrations of A and B. In all other cases they are not the same.

    8. Hierarchical Dynamics in the Morphological Evolution from Micelles to Giant Vesicles Induced by Hydrolysis of an Amphiphile (pages 1425–1427)

      Taro Toyota, Katsuto Takakura, Junko Kose and Tadashi Sugawara

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600176

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Lipid world: A sequential evolution from micelles to nested giant vesicles (see picture) is successfully achieved by using a hydrolyzable amphiphile. Furthermore, associated with the hydrolysis of the amphiphile, the aggregates in an aqueous dispersion show dynamic transformation from spheres to cylinders, plates and capsules at both nanometer and micrometer levels.

    9. On the Way to Nanometer-Sized Information of the Bacterial Surface by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (pages 1428–1430)

      Ute Neugebauer, Petra Rösch, Michael Schmitt, Jürgen Popp, Carine Julien, Akiko Rasmussen, Christian Budich and Volker Deckert

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600173

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A straight tip: With tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS), chemical and topographical information with nanometric resolution below the diffraction limit of soft biological samples such as bacteria can be gained simultaneously at short measuring times. This noninvasive technique opens new ways for the investigation of many problems in biology and biomedicine.

    10. Self-Assembly and Molecular Dynamics of Oligoindenofluorenes (pages 1431–1441)

      Mahdy M. Elmahdy, George Floudas, Luke Oldridge, Andrew C. Grimsdale and Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600015

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self assembly and dynamics of indenofluorenes: Stable blue-emitting oligo-indenofluorenes up to the polymer were investigated with respect to the self-assembly mechanism and the associated dynamics. The low dielectric loss revealed the absence of ketone defects. These materials (see wide-angle X-ray scattering pattern; me=meridional, eq=equatorial) form smectic mesophases and their structural relaxation times display strong molecular weight dependence.

    11. Monitoring Protein Interactions in the Living Cell Through the Fluorescence Decays of the Cyan Fluorescent Protein (pages 1442–1454)

      Regis Grailhe, Fabienne Merola, Jacqueline Ridard, Stephen Couvignou, Chantal Le Poupon, Jean-Pierre Changeux and Helene Laguitton-Pasquier

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600057

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Against the crowd: It is widely accepted that macromolecular crowding should enhance association between proteins, however, for cyan- and yellow fluorescent proteins (CFP/YFP), dimers are not formed. For CFP systematic concentration-dependent quenching occurs (see figure).

    12. First-Principles Simulation of the Photoreaction of a Capped Azobenzene: The Rotational Pathway is Feasible (pages 1455–1461)

      Christel Nonnenberg, Hermann Gaub and Irmgard Frank

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600080

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crown allows rotation: Capping with an azacrown ether does not prevent the rotational isomerization mechanism of trans-azobenzene (see figure). Excited-state molecular dynamics simulations allow detailed monitoring of the complex nuclear motion.

    13. Adsorption and Dynamics of Long-Range Interacting Fullerenes in a Flexible, Two-Dimensional, Nanoporous Porphyrin Network (pages 1462–1470)

      Andreas Kiebele, Davide Bonifazi, Fuyong Cheng, Meike Stöhr, François Diederich, Thomas Jung and Hannes Spillmann

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600186

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hopping fullerenes: The adsorption and dynamics of C60 and C70 fullerenes hosted in a self-assembled two-dimensional nanoporous porphyrin network on a solid Ag surface are presented. Long-range, coverage-dependent interactions between the all-carbon guests, which affect their mobility and are mediated by a mechanism involving the Ag substrate and the flexible porphyrin host network, are observed.

    14. Hydrogen Atom and Hydride Anion Addition to Adenine: Structures and Energetics (pages 1471–1480)

      Francesco A. Evangelista and Henry F. Schaefer III

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600049

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Radical damage: The radicals and anions derived from the 9H-adenine tautomer by adding a hydrogen atom to one of the double bonds are studied by using the B3LYP functional and a double-ζ plus polarization basis set. Optimized geometries, energies, and vibrational frequencies are predicted for eight radicals and anions. The primary chemical processes that are likely to cause DNA damage via the nucleic acid bases are discussed (see picture).

    15. Conformations of α-Aminobutyric Acid in the Gas Phase (pages 1481–1487)

      Emilio J. Cocinero, Alberto Lesarri, M. Eugenia Sanz, Juan C. López and José L. Alonso

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600091

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Jet-cooled rotational spectroscopy on laser-ablated α-aminobutyric acid detected three conformers of the neutral molecule (Ib, left; Ia, center; IIb, right). The conformation is primarily controlled by intramolecular hydrogen bonding. The two most stable conformers Ia and Ib exhibit an N[BOND]H⋅⋅⋅O[DOUBLE BOND]C interaction, while an N⋅⋅⋅H[BOND]O link is present in the higher-energy conformer IIb. The ethyl side chain adopts two different orientations in the observed conformers.

    16. Theoretical Characterization of the Gas-Phase O3⋅⋅⋅HO Hydrogen-Bonded Complex (pages 1488–1493)

      Alex Mansergas and Josep M. Anglada

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600115

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Neither the unpaired electron of the hydroxyl radical nor the π system of ozone that provides its biradical character is involved in the hydrogen-bonding interaction that stabilizes the O3⋅⋅⋅HO complex (see picture). The picture shows the optimized structure of one of the two hydrogen-bonded complexes that are located, together with its natural orbitals.

    17. Gas-Phase Watson–Crick and Hoogsteen Isomers of the Nucleobase Mimic 9-Methyladenine⋅2-Pyridone (pages 1494–1499)

      Jann A. Frey, Roman Leist, Andreas Müller and Samuel Leutwyler

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200500692

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Model isomers: 2-Pyridone⋅9-methyladenine is the simplest gas-phase base pair which can mimic the Watson–Crick and Hoogsteen binding sites of adenine (see picture). Its gas-phase S0 and S1 vibrational frequencies are reported and compared with ab initio calculated frequencies to identify the two isomers.

    18. Generation and Growth Mechanism of Metal (Fe, Co, Ni) Nanotube Arrays (pages 1500–1504)

      Huaqiang Cao, Liduo Wang, Yong Qiu, Qingzhi Wu, Guozhi Wang, Lei Zhang and Xiangwen Liu

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200500690

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Growth factors: Metal nanotube arrays (see scanning electron microscopy image) are synthesized by a template-based electrodeposition method via a growth mechanism termed current-directed tubular growth. The growth rates are competitive parallel and perpendicular to the current direction, which results in either nanotubes or nanowires. Nanotubes of Fe, Co, and Ni with nonlayered structures are produced at an increased current density.

    19. Cu2O Nanowires in an Alumina Template: Electrochemical Conditions for the Synthesis and Photoluminescence Characteristics (pages 1505–1509)

      Eunseong Ko, Jinsub Choi, Koichi Okamoto, Yongsug Tak and Jaeyoung Lee

      Article first published online: 30 MAY 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fastidious nanowires: The preparative electrochemical conditions for Cu2O nanowires in a porous alumina template (see microstructure picture) are different to those for a bulk thin Cu2O layer. The nanowires can only be prepared in a pH range from 8 to 10 and under optimized conditions, polycrystalline Cu2O nanowires with a length of 4 μm are obtained.

    20. Synthesis of Single-Crystalline Platinum Nanorods within a Soft Crystalline Surfactant–PtII Complex (pages 1510–1513)

      Rema Krishnaswamy , Hynd Remita, Marianne Impéror-Clerc, Catherine Even, Patrick Davidson and Brigitte Pansu

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crystalline complexes: Room temperature synthesis of a lamellar PtII complex in a surfactant solution followed by radiolysis results in single-crystalline platinum nanorods. Analysis of the shape during synthesis reveals that the single-crystalline nanorods grow by an aggregative mechanism through the coalescence of spherical seeds 3–4 nm in diameter.

    21. Electronic Energy Transfer in a Multiporphyrin-Based Molecular Box (pages 1514–1519)

      Anna Prodi, Claudio Chiorboli, Franco Scandola, Elisabetta Iengo and Enzo Alessio

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600065

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fast track: A self-assembled porphyrin-based molecular box (see figure) behaves as a simple six chromophore antenna system, in which the light energy harvested by the zinc–porphyrin units of the outer metallacycles is funneled into the central free-base units. Although the rate of singlet energy transfer is high, the efficiency is only 0.5 due to the possibility of competing electron-transfer quenching.

    22. Internal Noise Coherent Resonance for Mesoscopic Chemical Oscillations: A Fundamental Study (pages 1520–1524)

      Zhonghuai Hou, Tie Jun Xiao and Houwen Xin

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600072

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Insight into noise coherent resonance: The effect of internal noise on a mesoscopic chemical oscillator is studied analytically in a parameter region outside, but close to, the supercritical Hopf bifurcation. By normal form analysis and a stochastic averaging procedure, noise-induced oscillation (see picture) and internal noise coherent resonance (which is also related to an optimal system size) are well reproduced by the theory.

    23. Incorporation of Anthracene into Zeolites: Confinement Effect on the Recombination Rate of Photoinduced Radical Cation-Electron Pair (pages 1525–1534)

      Séverine Marquis, Alain Moissette and Claude Brémard

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600082

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It could take up to a year: Raman spectroscopy provides evidence of slow anthracene (ANT) sorption in medium pore MnZSM-5 zeolites (M=Na+, K+, Rb+, Cs+). Laser photolysis of ANT@MnZSM-5 generates long-lived radical pairs in aluminum-rich zeolites (n=3.4, 6.6) whose recombination kinetics dramatically depend on the aluminum content and on the nature of the cation (see figure).

    24. Electrodeposition of Nano- and Microcrystalline Aluminium in Three Different Air and Water Stable Ionic Liquids (pages 1535–1543)

      S. Zein El Abedin, E. M. Moustafa, R. Hempelmann, H. Natter and F. Endres

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600095

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel generation: The electrodeposition of aluminium is investigated in three different ionic liquids (see picture) leading either to nanocrystalline or microcrystalline deposits. The particle size is found to be dependent on the temperature. The authors show the enormous potential of these liquids in the electrodeposition of metals.

    25. Predicting the Shape and Structure of Face-Centered Cubic Gold Nanocrystals Smaller than 3 nm (pages 1544–1553)

      Amanda S. Barnard and Larry A. Curtiss

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600107

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small gold clusters: Polyhedral face-centered cubic (fcc) gold particles (<3 nm) are investigated using relativistic first-principles calculations to predict their preferred shapes and relative stability. Very small clusters (<1 nm) have a cuboctahedron shape which rapidly becomes energetically unstable with respect to the (truncated) octahedron and truncated cube shapes as the size increases.

    26. Structural Studies of 1-Butyl-3-methylimidazolium Tetrafluoroborate/TX-100/ p-Xylene Ionic Liquid Microemulsions (pages 1554–1561)

      Yan'an Gao, Jin Zhang, Hongyan Xu, Xueyan Zhao, Liqiang Zheng, Xinwei Li and Li Yu

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600120

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Waterless microemulsions: The ionic liquid (IL) 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (bmimBF4) forms nonaqueous microemulsions with p-xylene, with the aid of the nonionic surfactant TX-100. The phase behavior (see figure) of the ternary system is investigated by conductivity measurements, dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform IR (FTIR), 1H NMR, and UV/Vis spectroscopy.

    27. Oriented Ensembles in Ultrafast Electron Diffraction (pages 1562–1574)

      J. Spencer Baskin and Ahmed H. Zewail

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600133

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A general approach for electron scattering expressions applicable to anisotropic ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) experiments on the femto- and picosecond time scale is presented. This theory is critical for proper understanding of structural dynamics on the time scale of population and orientational changes. The picture shows an evolving ensemble orientation in the interaction volume of a UED experiment.

    28. An Alternative Approach to the g-Matrix: Theory and Applications (pages 1575–1589)

      Hélène Bolvin

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600051

      Predicting EPR g-factors: A new method for calculating the anisotropy of the g-matrix in EPR spectra is detailed. The results compare well to experimental data and to previous theoretical work. For each molecule, the anisotropy is modeled by a few parameters. Its accuracy is some parts per thousand for small organic radicals and some tens of parts of thousands for small radicals containing a heavy atom.

    29. Determination of the Hydration Number of Gadolinium(III) Complexes by High-Field Pulsed 17O ENDOR Spectroscopy (pages 1590–1597)

      Arnold M. Raitsimring, Andrei V. Astashkin, Debbie Baute, Daniela Goldfarb, Oleg G. Poluektov, Mark P. Lowe, Stephan G. Zech and Peter Caravan

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200600138

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hydration numbers: High-field pulsed 17O ENDOR is used to determine the number of inner-sphere water molecules for gadolinium-based magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents. The feature at ±0.67 MHz (arrow) is indicative of coordinated water (see picture). Compounds without inner-sphere water (blue trace) do not show this feature, nor exhibit significant ENDOR amplitude at this frequency. The red trace is a novel compound with one coordinated water molecule.

    30. You have free access to this content
      Preview: ChemPhysChem 7/2006 (page 1602)

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cphc.200690025

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION