Standard Article

Electrical Transmission: A Functional Analysis and Comparison to Chemical Transmission

Handbook of Physiology, The Nervous System, Cellular Biology of Neurons

  1. M. V. L. Bennett

Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/cphy.cp010111

Comprehensive Physiology

Comprehensive Physiology

How to Cite

Bennett, M. V. L. 2011. Electrical Transmission: A Functional Analysis and Comparison to Chemical Transmission. Comprehensive Physiology. 357–416.

Author Information

  1. Division of Cellular Neurobiology, Department of Neuroscience, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Yeshiva University, New York, New York

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

Abstract

The sections in this article are:

  • 1
    Electrically Mediated Synaptic Transmission
    • 1.1
      Electrotonic Synapses
    • 1.2
      Rectifying Electrotonic Synapses
    • 1.3
      Electrical Inhibition
    • 1.4
      Electrical Interactions Across Extracellular Space
  • 2
    Functions of Electrotonic Transmission
    • 2.1
      Short Latency in Through-conducting Systems
    • 2.2
      Reciprocity and Short Latency in Highly Synchronized Systems
    • 2.3
      Synchronization in Relay Nuclei and Effector Organs
    • 2.4
      Asynchronous Activity and Reciprocal Excitation
    • 2.5
      Pathways of Electrotonic Coupling in Synchronization
    • 2.6
      Synaptic Control of Degree of Coupling
    • 2.7
      Cellular Control of Electrotonic Junctions
    • 2.8
      Functions of Electrotonic Junctions in Nonelectrical Communication
  • 3
    Some “Unusual” Properties of Chemically Mediated Transmission
    • 3.1
      Tonic Release of Transmitter
    • 3.2
      PSP's Involving a Conductance Decrease and Cytoplasmic Messengers
    • 3.3
      Dual- and Multiple-action Synapses
  • 4
    Functional Considerations in Mode of Transmission
    • 4.1
      Input-Output Relations of Electrically Excitable Membrane
    • 4.2
      Identification of Mode of Transmission
    • 4.3
      Properties with Clear Advantages to Either Mode
    • 4.4
      Properties with at Most a Modest Advantage to Either Mode
    • 4.5
      Evaluation and Prospects