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Biochemistry and Physiology of Amino Acid Transmitters

Handbook of Physiology, The Nervous System, Cellular Biology of Neurons

  1. K. Obata

Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/cphy.cp010117

Comprehensive Physiology

Comprehensive Physiology

How to Cite

Obata, K. 2011. Biochemistry and Physiology of Amino Acid Transmitters. Comprehensive Physiology. 625–650.

Author Information

  1. Department of Pharmacology, Gunma University School of Medicine, Maebashi, Japan

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

Abstract

The sections in this article are:

  • 1
    How Amino Acids Became Recognized as Neurotransmitters
  • 2
    Possible Functions of Free Amino Acids
  • 3
    Transmitter Function of γ-Aminobutyric Acid and Glycine
    • 3.1
      Inhibitory Action of Amino Acids
    • 3.2
      Agents That Block Amino Acid Inhibition
    • 3.3
      Synthesis and Storage of γ-Aminobutyric Acid
    • 3.4
      Uptake of γ-Aminobutyric Acid
    • 3.5
      Release of γ-Aminobutyric Acid
    • 3.6
      Synthesis and Storage of Glycine
    • 3.7
      Uptake and Release of Glycine
    • 3.8
      Summary
  • 4
    Transmitter Function of L-Glutamate and Related Amino Acids
    • 4.1
      Excitatory Action of Amino Acids
    • 4.2
      Distribution of L-glutamate and L-aspartate
    • 4.3
      Uptake and Release of L-glutamate
    • 4.4
      Summary