Standard Article

Peripheral Chemoreceptors and Their Sensory Neurons in Chronic States of Hypo- and Hyperoxygenation

Handbook of Physiology, Environmental Physiology

  1. Sukhamay Lahiri

Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/cphy.cp040251

Comprehensive Physiology

Comprehensive Physiology

How to Cite

Lahiri, S. 2011. Peripheral Chemoreceptors and Their Sensory Neurons in Chronic States of Hypo- and Hyperoxygenation. Comprehensive Physiology. 1183–1206.

Author Information

  1. Department of Physiology, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

Abstract

The sections in this article are:

  • 1
    Overview: Peripheral Chemoreceptors and Sensory Neurons
  • 2
    Oxygen Continuum and Optimum
  • 3
    pHo-pHi Relationship and CO2-H+ Stimulus Interaction with Hypoxia: Role of Carbonic Anhydrase
    • 3.1
      CO2–H+ and Interaction with Hypoxia
    • 3.2
      Catecholamine Release and Chemosensory Nerve Discharge
  • 4
    Oxygen Delivery
    • 4.1
      Po2 vs. O2 Content
    • 4.2
      Arterial Perfusion Pressure
    • 4.3
      Carotid Body Blood Volume and Flow
  • 5
    Integrated Carotid Body and Glomus Cell
  • 6
    Oxygen and Chemoreceptive Pigments
    • 6.1
      Carbon Monoxide/Oxygen
    • 6.2
      Nitric Oxide/Oxygen
  • 7
    Chronic Hypoxia Vs. Hyperoxia
    • 7.1
      Structure
    • 7.2
      Neurotransmitters and Gene Expression
    • 7.3
      Chemosensory Nerve Function
  • 8
    Chronic Cell Depolarization
  • 9
    Efferent Control
    • 9.1
      Petrosal and Nodose Ganglia
    • 9.2
      Sympathetic Ganglia
    • 9.3
      Cyclic GMP, Vascular Smooth Muscle, Glomus Cells, Petrosal Ganglion Processes, and Innervation of Carotid Body Elements
    • 9.4
      Cobalt, Other Transition Metals, and Ca2+
  • 10
    Lifelong Hypoxia and Developmental Aspects
  • 11
    Peripheral Chemoreceptors in Cardiopulmonary and Vascular Diseases
    • 11.1
      Cardiopulmonary and Vascular Diseases
    • 11.2
      Diseases of the Glomoids
    • 11.3
      Baroreceptor vs. Peripheral Chemoreceptors
  • 12
    Perspectives