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Reflexes Controlling Circulatory, Ventilatory and Airway Responses to Exercise

Handbook of Physiology, Exercise: Regulation and Integration of Multiple Systems

  1. Marc P. Kaufman1,
  2. Hubert V. Forster2

Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/cphy.cp120110

Comprehensive Physiology

Comprehensive Physiology

How to Cite

Kaufman, M. P. and Forster, H. V. 2011. Reflexes Controlling Circulatory, Ventilatory and Airway Responses to Exercise. Comprehensive Physiology. 381–447.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Departments of Internal Medicine and Human Physiology, University of California, Davis, Davis, California

  2. 2

    Department of Physiology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

Abstract

The sections in this article are:

  • 1
    Reflex Cardiovascular Responses to Muscular Contraction in Anesthetized and Decerebrate Animals
    • 1.1
      Sensory Innervation of Skeletal Muscle
    • 1.2
      Reflex Autonomic Responses to Stimulation of Muscle Afferents in Anesthetized Animals
    • 1.3
      Discharge Properties of Group III and IV Muscle Afferents
    • 1.4
      The Site of the First Synapse—The Dorsal Horn
    • 1.5
      Role of Spinal Neurotransmitters and Neuromodulators in the Exercise Pressor Reflex
    • 1.6
      Pathways Ascending from the Dorsal Horn
    • 1.7
      The Ventrolateral Medulla
    • 1.8
      Other Central Neural Structures
    • 1.9
      Final Common Pathways
    • 1.10
      Interaction Between the Arterial Baroreflex and the Exercise Pressor Reflex in Anesthetized and Decerebrate Animals
  • 2
    Evidence for the Exercise Pressor Reflex in Humans and Conscious Animals
    • 2.1
      Feedback from Contracting Limb Skeletal Muscle in Humans and Conscious Animals
    • 2.2
      The Nature of the Stimulus Evoking the Exercise Pressor Reflex
  • 3
    Contribution of Peripheral Afferents to the Exercise Hyperpnea
    • 3.1
      Afferents from the Exercising limbs
    • 3.2
      The Carotid Chemoreceptor Afferents
    • 3.3
      Role in Hyperventilation During Heavy Exercise
    • 3.4
      The Pulmonary Afferents
    • 3.5
      Cardiac Afferents
    • 3.6
      Respiratory Muscle Afferents
    • 3.7
      Mediation of the Exercise Hyperpnea by Multiple Mechanisms
  • 4
    Summary and Conclusions
    • 4.1
      Peripheral Afferent Contribution to Circulatory Responses to Exercise
    • 4.2
      Peripheral Afferent Contribution to Ventilatory Responses to Exercise