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Activation of Sperm and Egg During Fertilization

Handbook of Physiology, Cell Physiology

  1. David Epel

Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/cphy.cp140123

Comprehensive Physiology

Comprehensive Physiology

How to Cite

Epel, D. 2011. Activation of Sperm and Egg During Fertilization. Comprehensive Physiology. 859–884.

Author Information

  1. Hopkins Marine Station, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 1 JAN 2011

Abstract

The sections in this article are:

  • 1
    Chemotaxis (or, the Dating Game)
    • 1.1
      Historical Background
    • 1.2
      Motility and Chemotactic Substances in Sea Urchin Gametes
    • 1.3
      Does Chemotaxis Exist in the Real World?
  • 2
    The Acrosome Reaction
    • 2.1
      Description of the Phenomenon
    • 2.2
      Signal Transduction Molecules
  • 3
    Sperm-Egg Binding
  • 4
    Passage of the Sperm Through the Egg Coat
  • 5
    Sperm-Egg Receptors and Speciation
  • 6
    A Description of Egg Activation
    • 6.1
      What Happens When Sperm Meets Egg?
  • 7
    The Role of Calcium in Egg Activation
    • 7.1
      Historical Background
    • 7.2
      The Natural History of Calcium Changes at Fertilization
    • 7.3
      Mechanisms of the Calcium Increase
    • 7.4
      How Does the Sperm Trigger the Calcium Increase?
  • 8
    What is Calcium Doing to Activate the Egg?
    • 8.1
      The Timetable of Fertilization Responses in the Sea Urchin Egg
    • 8.2
      Intracellular pH Changes
  • 9
    Entry into the Cell Cycle
    • 9.1
      Synthesis of Cyclin as a Prerequisite for Mitosis
    • 9.2
      Activation of Protein Kinase Activity As a Prerequisite for Mitosis
  • 10
    Structural Changes as an Important Concomitant of Fertilization
    • 10.1
      Microfilaments
    • 10.2
      Microtubules
    • 10.3
      Endoplasmic Reticulum
    • 10.4
      Introduction of the Centrosome as a Critical Event
    • 10.5
      Ooplasmic Segregation
  • 11
    Epilogue—Is Fertilization a Unique Event in the Life History of the Organism?