N-(2-Aminoethyl)glycine and Amino Acids from Interstellar Ice Analogues

Authors

  • Dr. Cornelia Meinert,

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS UNSA, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculté des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)
    • Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS UNSA, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculté des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)
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  • Dr. Jean-Jacques Filippi,

    1. Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS UNSA, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculté des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)
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  • Dr. Pierre de Marcellus,

    1. Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Astrochimie et Origines, UMR 8617 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)
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  • Dr. Louis Le Sergeant d'Hendecourt,

    1. Institut d'Astrophysique Spatiale, Astrochimie et Origines, UMR 8617 CNRS, Université Paris-Sud, Orsay (France)
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  • Prof. Dr. Uwe J. Meierhenrich

    Corresponding author
    1. Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS UNSA, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculté des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)
    • Institut de Chimie de Nice, UMR 7272 CNRS UNSA, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, Faculté des Sciences, Parc Valrose, 06108 Nice (France)
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Abstract

original image

Interstellar ices were simulated by condensing and UV irradiating molecules such as H2O, CH3OH, and NH3 at 80 K. Multidimensional gas chromatography analyses allowed for the identification of 26 amino and diamino acids (see graph). The results support the suggestion that potentially prebiotic molecules originating from the photochemistry of interstellar ices could have been incorporated in cometary dust and delivered to the early Earth.

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