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Investigation of Copper Corrosion Inhibition with Frequency-Dependent Alternating-Current Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy

Authors

  • Dr. Juan José Santana,

    1. Department of Physical Chemistry, University of La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
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  • Dr. Maike Pähler,

    1. Analytische Chemie-Elektroanalytik & Sensorik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)
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  • Prof. Wolfgang Schuhmann,

    Corresponding author
    1. Analytische Chemie-Elektroanalytik & Sensorik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)
    • Analytische Chemie-Elektroanalytik & Sensorik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, 44780 Bochum (Germany)
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  • Prof. Ricardo M. Souto

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physical Chemistry, University of La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
    2. Instituto de Materiales y Nanotecnologías, University of La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
    3. On leave from: Department of Process Engineering, University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Campus Universitario de Tafira, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain)
    • Department of Physical Chemistry, University of La Laguna, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife, Canary Islands (Spain)
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Abstract

Alternating current scanning electrochemical microscopy (AC-SECM) is used to investigate the inhibition of copper corrosion by four potential inhibitors, namely benzotriazole (BTAH), 5-methyl-benzotriazole (MBTAH), 2-mercaptobenzimidazole (MBI), and ethyl xanthate (EX). It is shown that the formation of inhibitor films on the metal can be followed from the decrease of the substrate’s local electrochemical activity associated with the formation of inhibitor-containing surface layers. Sensitive imaging can be performed that accounts for changes in electrochemical activity of the modified surfaces, as well as for their corrosive attack from the environment. AC-SECM is shown to be a powerful technique for the investigation of corrosion processes.

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