Extraction of Noble and Rare-Earth Metals from Aqueous Solutions by DNA Cross-Linked Hydrogels

Authors

  • Yuko Maeda,

    1. Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 052-789-4765
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  • Dr. Anatoly Zinchenko,

    Corresponding author
    1. Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 052-789-4765
    • Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 052-789-4765
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  • Dr. Larisa I. Lopatina,

    1. Department of Colloid Science, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119991 (Russia)
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  • Prof. Dr. Vladimir G. Sergeyev,

    1. Department of Polymer Science, Faculty of Chemistry, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119991 (Russia)
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  • Prof. Dr. Shizuaki Murata

    1. Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan), Fax: (+81) 052-789-4765
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Abstract

Invited for this month’s cover is the group of Prof. Shizuaki Murata and Dr. Anatoly Zinchenko from Nagoya University and the group of Prof. Vladimir Sergeyev from Moscow State University. The cover picture shows the accumulation of noble and rare-earth metals by DNA cross-linked hydrogel. Read the full text of the article on page 619 ff..

How did the collaboration on this project start?

1234The collaboration between the groups of Vladimir Sergeyev and Shizuaki Murata began in early 2000, when Moscow State University graduate Anatoly Zinchenko entered the PhD program at Nagoya University to study the control of DNA conformational behavior by synthetic organic binders. The collaboration on DNA hydrogel was initiated during a two-month visit to Nagoya University by Prof. Sergeyev in 2012.

Scheme 1.

Larisa Lopatina Vladimir Sergeyev

Scheme 2.

Front row, from left to right: Shizuaki Murata (fourth), Anatoly Zinchenko (fifth), Yuko Maeda (sixth).

Scheme 3.
Scheme 4.

What do you consider the exciting developments in the field?

The findings reported in our Communication were anticipated based on intrinsic DNA affinity to noble and rare-earth metals. More importantly, systems containing metal ions inside a polymeric matrix are very promising because they allow various reactions to be performed directly inside the hydrogel. This could be particularly beneficial for the synthesis of inorganic nanostructures inside a hydrogel “reactor”, where the growth of nanostructures can be controlled by both slow diffusion and stabilization exerted by the polymeric matrix.

What other topics are you working on at the moment?

The group in Nagoya works on various applications of DNA as well as reusable forms of salmon milt waste and its application as a functional material for pollution removal.

Acknowledgements

This entire project was financially supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan (MEXT). The Japanese research group acknowledges support from Maruha Nichiro Holdings, Inc. (Japan) for providing free DNA samples.

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